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Address 

OVERLAND MONTHLY 

21 SUTTER ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



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(California XtowrtiaeK. 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




Vol. LXXXV 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, January 3, 1914 



No. 1 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 21 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3694. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
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Chicago Office — Jno. A. Tenney, 452 Peoples Gas Building, Chicago. 

Boston Office — Charles S. Parr, 525 Tremont Temple. 

London Office — George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C England. 

Matter intended for publication in the current number of the SAN 
FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER should 

be sent to the office not later than 5 p. m. Wednesday. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) — 1 year, J4.00; S months, $2.26. 
Foreign— 1 year, $6.00; 6 months, $3.26. 



-Is it wet enough for you? 

-Everybody kicks the government weather prophet. 

-Christmas has become a municipal institution in San 



Francisco. 

The San Francisco unemployed are largely constituted 

of the don't want to be employed. 

The latest thing in movies is a California orange orchard 

scene showing the several processes of the industry. 

• Apropos of Theodore Roosevelt's autobiography, Perci- 

val Phillips calls him "the apostle of the furious life." 

Is the book of Job a play or an epic. A Wisconsin col- 
lege professor insists it is a play and will put it on the stage. 

Secretary Lane gives Congress a stiff hunch to get things 

moving in Alaska, but Congress is lazy, and heedless. Alaska 
has no votes. 

Another "bifurcated candidate" appears in Anthony 

Caminetti, who is willing to be either Senator or Governor. He 
should beware the fate of the man who butts in. 

The sportsmen of Sacramento contributed 400 ducks and 

geese to furnish forth the tables of the unemployed with one 
of those appetizing goose stews for which Sacramento is cele- 
brated. 

W. Parker Lyon, former Mayor of Fresno, now living in 

Pasadena, has an Austrian count for his chauffeur. He styles 
himself the Count Martino Martinovich de Rovigo, but carries 
no other extra baggage. 

Secretary Lane predicts that low grade coal will in fu- 
ture be converted into electric current at the pit mouth and 
transmitted by wire. The 19th was the century of steam. This 
is the age of electricity. 

The poet laureate's Christmas ode is lame and common- 
place. It is a theme that no man has handled adequately since 
John Milton. Sir Robert Bridges gives an example of the un- 
conscious association of ideas in that as he was writing about 
the stars, he naturally invented the rotesque phrase "constel- 
lated sound." 



Commissioner Pillsbury, of the Industrial accident 

board, is quoted to the effect that a man employed in a powder 
mill at $100 a month will cost his employer some $450 a year 
extra for accident insurance. 

It is announced from Sacramento that a sufficient num- 
ber of signatures has been attached to the petition for sub- 
mission to vote of a constitutional amendment limiting property 
owners the right to vote on bond issues. 

The San Francisco fire brought some good luck to An- 
thony Curtin, a Folsom prisoner under sentence for ten years, 
who had his sentence commuted after serving seven years and 
five months because the records for his appeal were burned in 
the fire. 

The County Clerk of Santa Clara figures that there are 

three thousand trout fishermen in his jurisdiction who must 
take out licenses. Here we have statistical proof of Falstaff's 
remark, "Lord, how the world is given to lying" — three thou- 
sand of them. 

A Kansas official has decided that a dog is a luxury. "If 

a family is poor," he observes, "it has a dog. If it is very poor 
it has two dogs." Therefore, such a family is not entitled to 
public relief, which may be queer logic, but sounds like com- 
mon sense. 

County Auditor Underhill of San Mateo is making an 

effort to stop the pay of the women serving on the grand jury. 
The women say that Underwood is peeved because they sharply 
criticised the conduct of his office, and they think he is taking 
a shabby way to get even. 

One notes the appearance of an institution known as 

"The Manuscript Producing Corporation." It appears that in 
the march of improvement and evolution. Grub street has at 
last been incorporated and taking on the aspect of a trust, will 
become respectable in its old age. 

The way of the eugenic reformer is hard. Last week he 

struck a snag in Wisconsin because he had not provided a decent 
fee for medical certificates required before marriage, and this 
week in the same State it appears that the old-fashioned com- 
mon law marriage by consent without more is legal, so that 
the code of restrictions planned for the improvement of the 
human race becomes useless. 

Thieves arrested in San Jose protested that the diamond 

stolen from the house of a local capitalist were paste, and 
therefore they contemptuously returned the jewels. Now that 
was very considerate of the burglars, even if insulting, but the 
circumstances showed a thoughtful sense of the situation 
part of the owner, who indulged in ornaments not good enough 
to sell, but quite adequate for all purposes of show. Foiled 
again. 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 3, 1914. 




E/DITQRIRL/ COMMIT 




Not by any means the least of the 
A Tempest in a troubles of a national administration 

Social Teapot. is the nice and fit adjustment by the 

"cabinet of ladies" of a hundred 
perplexing questions of social precedence and polite observ- 
ance. The "cabinet lady" holds no official position, but she 
fills a difficult place of trust, and she may easily bring down a 
hornet's nest about her husband's head by some failure of tact 
or omission to fulfill an apparently trivial social duty. Here, 
for instance, is the method taken by Mrs. William Jennings 
Bryan to allay a recent tempest in the Washington teapot by 
means of a public explanation, as follows: 

"Owing to recent discussions regarding the returning of 
calls by the ladies of the Cabinet, the following announce- 
ment is made : Speaking for the ladies of the Cabinet who 
regret the erroneous impression created by an article ap- 
pearing in a local paper last spring in regard to their atti- 
tude in the matter of returning calls made upon them by the 
wives of members of the House of Representatives, I wish 
to say that they intend to return, as far as possible, all such 
calls." 

There is a certain air of diplomacy proper to the wife of a 
Secretary of State, about this explanation, and the lady judi- 
ciously attaches a string to her pledge to return calls "so far 
as possible." 

The way of society, sophisticated by the desire to ape Euro- 
pean customs, is not at all a primrose path. The recent White 
House wedding left many sore spots in Washington society 
owing to the fact that for lack of room invitations had to be re- 
stricted. To be so excluded from the roll of the socially elect 
is a mortal, and in fact an immortal insult. 



It seems as if there might be some 
Anonymous Mountains useful work for the Sierra Club of 
Of California. California in helping out the map- 

makers by providing appropriate 
names for striking natural objects like the sixty anonymous 
mountains of more than 13,000 feet in height, of whose neglect 
in this regard the United States Geological Survey complains. 
A recent note issued by the survey gives this information about 
our neglected superfluity of mountains: 

"Things are wonderful principally by comparison. There 
are 60 or more lofty mountains in California rising more 
than 1.3,000 feet above sea level which are not considered 
sufficiently noteworthy among all the surrounding wealth 
of mountain scenery to have even received names. Any 
one of these mountain peaks, if situated in the eastern part 
of the United States, would of course be visited by millions 
of people. But California has 70 additional mountain 
peaks more than 13,000 feet high which have been named, 
or 130 in all, as well as a dozen rising above 14,000 feet." 

Possibly not all the names of local use have found their way 
on to the maps. There is Tinkers Knob, for instance, a well 
known mountain near the north fork of the American River, 
with a story attached to the name. Has this immortal tinker- 
not related to John Bunyan— been accepted by the map-makers 
of the survey? We do not know, but it seems that the Sierra 
Club might usefully collect the local folk lore of these more 
or less distinguished but neglected mountains. 



Is tne advance of civilization com- 
Canvasback Retires patible with field sports? In fine, 

Before Civilization. can intensive farming and duck 

shooting live together? The recla- 
mation all under which it is proposed to bring the delta of the 
Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers under cultivation as vege- 
table fields will bring the tules and the sloughs under a strict 
discipline, and confine them in a decent and orderly canal with 
reliable banks. This "by pass" so-called is designed to take 
care of the superfluous waters of these unruly rivers in a wet 
season, and put the winter floods in a strait-jacket. 

Now the question is : When the tule lands are all subdued and 
converted into asparagus beds and celery fields, will the ducks 
resent the materialism that converts a swamp into a garden and 
go elsewhere seeking fresh woods and pastures new? A writer 
in the Sacramento Union has examined this matter and finds 
himself free to prophesy that the ducks will be taken care of, 
and made comfortable, because there will be as much water as 
before, with this single difference, that the floods will be made 
to behave themselves. But that is a vital difference so far as 
sport is concerned. The wild creatures resent the neighborhood 
of the spade and all its relatives. The writer describes the by- 
pass: 

"The immense by-pass, through which all overflow 
waters are to flow, will extend from the neighborhood of 
Gridley to Collinsville, a distance of about eighty miles. 
This will be on an average of 2,000 feet wide, which means 
that the State will at once come into possession of approxi- 
mately 25,000 acres of water, every foot of which will be 
deep enough for even the canbasback to frolic around in, 
and ample at all seasons of the year for the propagation 
of every kind of fish known to our inland waters— and free 
as the air to all who provide themselves with the proper 
license to take or kill them. There are at the present time 
nearly 1,500,000 acres of water surface in California. 
When it is taken into consideration that this includes every 
river and lake in the St"ate, it will at once be seen that only 
a very small portion of this vast area of water is to be 
'dried up' by the reclamation act. As a matter of fact only 
a very few acres, comparatively, will come under the scope 
of the immense project now contemplated to be reclaimed." 
Of course, the ducks will have room to swim without danger 
of getting stranded, but the wild fowl want something more 
than water, and the reclamation of the tules will deprive them 
of their natural cover. You can't have your cake and eat it. 

W 
It appears that the so-called "prob- 
Picturesque Parliament lem" of the unemployed in Califor- 
On the Hoof. nia has been greatly exaggerated 

by the daily press, hungry for a 
sensation. We have seen reckless statements that the "arni'y" 
of those out of a job in San Francisco numbered 20,000, and 
in Los Angeles the newspapers capped that figure with an esti- 
mate of 30,000. Now, when we get down to brass tacks, in San 
Francisco and took a census of the idle, we found that they did 
not exceed 3,000, and most of these did not want to work on any 
reasonable conditions. The majority were simply hoboes and 
loafers, with a rooted prejudice against work of any sort. 

Much has been made in the despatches of the doings of an- 
other "army" of the unemployed whose southerly march down 
the San Joaquin Valley has been recorded daily. This progress 
of idle men had its picturesque features, and therefore had a 



January 3, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



news value, but as a sign of the tines, it had no particular 
significance in regard to the labor question, unless it might be 
regarded as a demonstration that th. problem of unemployment 
can easily be taken care of in a humane fashion. 

The newspapers persist in calling the San Joaquin body an 
"army," whereas it might more fittingly be described as a par- 
liament on the hoof. They appear to be decent men and not at 
all of the hobo variety, and they have effected a complete or- 
ganization which the despatches call "military," although in 
fact it is purely parliamentary, with a full set of officers and 
standing committees. As the itinerant parliament numbers only 
a few in excess of one hundred, they are easily taken care 
of in the valley towns. The Fresno Republican explains the 
genus of the movement in this wise : 

"This unemployed 'army' which is just now encamped in 
Fresno seems to be a particularly interesting and deserv- 
ing body of men, largely by virtue of the fact that it has no 
theories and represents no propagandas. These men are 
unemployed because they have no jobs. They are travel- 
ing in a group because a police judge in Stockton happened 
to float the original nucleus as a group, and other people 
have joined them along the line. They are not assailing 
any theories of society, but, taking the world as they find 
it — and they find it a hard one — they are looking for a job 
in it. As a social phenomenon they do present an extremely 
important theoretical challenge, but they are themselves 
not making the challenge that way. They are practical men 
confronted by a practical emergency and seeking to solve it 
by the immediate method that happens to be at their hand. 
Therefore, being practical men, it is well to meet them in 
a practical way, treating them with decency and considera- 
tion, and finding jobs for them if we can." 

The wisdom that remarks "these men are unemployed be- 
cause they have no jobs" startles and confounds, and the editor 
kindly tells them they will be taken care of so long as they 
don't talk too much. 



Tide Land Titles 
In Confusion. 



A Road to the Big 
Basin Forest. 



Andrew P. Hill, president of the 
Sempervirens Club, suggests an ad- 
mirable and beneficial plan to pro- 
vide work for the unemployed, and 
he points out the way to find the money. In fact, there is $70,- 
000 waiting in the State treasury to be applied on the construc- 
tion of a road opening the way to the Sempervirens Park owned 
by the State in Santa Cruz County, and sometimes called the 
Big Basin Forest. The money in the treasury is available on 
condition that rights of way for the road shall be provided by 
private enterprise. Mr. Hill writes : 

"We must deliver to the State a strip of 200 feet wide 
before it is available. It remains now to pay $7,600 for 76 
acres of this right of way, which is virgin timber, and will 
give a beautiful drive of three miles along a mountain 
ridge possessing unsurpassed views in beauty and gran- 
deur; of this, at least more than two miles will traverse a 
redwood forest. We are now building and saving for pos- 
terity the most important road of California, and every one 
should put his or her shoulder to the wheel, and help to 
preserve all its natural beauties. If this money cannot be 
raised now to purchase the timber on the right-of-way on 
this road, then the trees will have to be cut and sold in or- 
der to make the building of the road a possibility. These 
trees along this beautiful way could not be grown in less 
than 800 years, and their destruction must not be thought 
of." 

Mr. Hill asks for subscriptions to raise the money needed 
for rights of way. The Sempervirens Club is conducting a cam- 
paign for that purpose, and doubtless the automobile interests 
will favorably consider the matter. If the money were imme- 
diately available, it would provide wo k for all the unemployed 
in this neighborhood. 



The recent tidelands decision hand- 
ed down by the Supreme Court, al- 
though apparently sweeping in ef- 
fect, is not yet very clearly w 
stood by the lawyers as to its scope. The decision, of course, 
will go to the United States Supreme Court on appeal, but it 
does not seem likely that the local ruling will be disturbed by 
the Federal court. 

Attorney-General Webb was asked to explain the meaning 
and scope of the decision as it affects cities like Oakland, Los 
Angeles and San Diego, to which the State has, by legislative 
grant made over the control of their harbors. Mr. Webb ex- 
plained that in his view the State may delegate its sovereign 
rights over tidelands to subordinate branches of the common- 
wealth's governmental system, such as municipalities. It would 
seem, therefore, that in the opinion of the Attorney-General, 
based on his interpretation of the decision, the delegated rights 
of harbor control to cities will stand. 

No such delegation of State rights to private individuals or 
corporations is valid, and the immediate local application of 
this rule is that the State saves $1,000,000 borrowed for the 
purpose of buying waterfront lands on Islais Creek in this city, 
where it is designed to construct an interior harbor and docks 
which the commerce of the port so badly needs. This work, 
of course, must now be postponed pending the appeal to the 
United States Supreme Court. 



Meddlesome and 
Silly Legislation 



The Bowman law of last session, 
regulating game farming, appears 
to be an example of slipshod and 
haphazard legislation of the med- 
dlesome, ignorant and gratuitously annoying sort, if nothing 
worse. Indeed, the San Jose Mercury charges that the law is a 
"hold-up" stuffed with jokers. Local owners of pheasantries 
charge that the law is designed to corner the pheasant market, 
both game and plumage, and they base this claim on a clause 
in the law which states that a person raising pheasants "in a 
wholly enclosed preserve or entire island of which he is the 
owner or lessee, may make application to the fish and game 
commissioners for a license so to do." 

W. F. Powers, agent for Wells-Fargo & Co., in San Jose 
owns one of the largest pheasantries on this coast, and he is 
quoted in criticism of the law : 

"Acording to the Bowman law, those of us who have 
pheasants must have them on a preserve or an island, and 
then pay $25 a year for the privilege of keeping, raising or 
selling them. Even if a man has but two birds, he will 
have to pay the $25 just the same. 

"There is another foolish clause which says that pheas- 
ants or partridges may be killed other than by shooting be- 
tween October 1st and December 31st. In any other sea- 
son of the year we will have to shoot the pheasants if we 
desire to use them for the table. As the city ordinances 
prohibit the discharge of firearms within the city limits, 
that means we will have to take the birds outside of the 
city in order to shoot them. This means they are not to be 
raised other than on a preserve or an island. 

"Should any one sell or ship a pheasant he will first have 
to obtain a tag from the county game warden at a cost of 
three cents. He must take this tag and tie it to the leg of 
the bird to be shipped, and the tag must remain tied to the 
leg of the bird until every bit of meat is taken from the 
bone." 

The law is obviously the child of stupidity crossed on a med- 
dlesome disposition. We do not suspect its proponent 
sinister ulterior purpose. He is simply a busybody concerned 
about matters he does not understand, and invested for the n > 
ment with a little brief authority. 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 3, 1914. 



THE CANDID FRIEND 

Food Prices in San Francisco— California Raises the Luxuries, but not the Necessaries- 

An Unsound Economic Condition— The Waste of Public Money— A Tehama 

White Elephant— A Hot and Peppery Scot. 

BY EDWARD F. CAHILL 



Michel was talking the other day of food prices in San 
Francisco, and by way of illustration and explanation he re- 
marked : 

"We hardly raise meat enough to supply the home market in 
California." 

It is a fact that explains many things in relation to the high 
cost of living in San Francisco. California has gone into the 
business of raising the luxuries, and no longer produces the 
necessaries of life in any considerable supply. Eggs, poultry, 
flour and other cereal products are imported for our consump- 
tion in large quantities from the East and from Oregon. In a 
business sense, it pays better to produce the luxuries than the 
necessaries, because they fetch higher prices and the cost of 
production is little more. But the consequent rise of the price 
of necessaries bears hardly on people of fixed incomes and the 
salaried class generally residing in the cities. They are driven 
to lead a cafeteria existence. The facility with which the lux- 
uries can be produced in this State by reason of an exceptionally 
favorable climate has resulted in making California the richest 
State of the Union in proportion to population, and in fact the 
assessable wealth of the taxpaying body has been increasing 
by leaps and bounds ever since we abandoned wheat growing 
and took up with fruit, olives, wine and hops. 
^ 2r & 

Economically Unsound. 

The status of production here described may appear to be 
matter for congratulation, but I have my doubts whether on the 
whole it is not economically unsound. In explanation, I may 
quote from a recent address by George Bernard Shaw : 

"Suppose you find a man starving in the streets. You 
are sympathetic: you give that man sixpence. Suppose 
that man, instead of buying some bread and eating it, buys 
a bottle of scent to perfume his handkerchief with, and then 
dies of starvation, but with the satisfaction of having his 
handkerchief perfumed! You will admit that that man is 
an unsound economist, will you not? You will even de- 
clare that he is a lunatic? Well, allow me to tell you, gen- 
tlemen, that is exactly what this country is doing at the 
present time. It is spending very large sums on perfuming 
its handkerchief while it is starving, and while it is rotting. 
How are you going to remedy that? As long as you have 
inequality of income, that mad state of things is compul- 
sory. If one man has not enough money to feed his child- 
ren properly, and another man has so much that after feed- 
ing and clothing and lodging himself and his family as lux- 
uriously as possible, he has still a large surplus fund, you 
will find that the richer man will take his surplus purchas- 
ing power into the market, and by that purchasing power 
set the labor of the country, which ought to be devoted to 
producing more food for people who have not enough food, 
to the production of 80 horsepower motor car, and yachts 
and jewels, and boxes at the opera, and to the construction 
of such towns as Nice and Monte Carlo. The thing is in- 
evitable. Production is determined by purchasing power 
and always will be." 

S S ~S 

Too Many Scent Bottles. 

These facts go far to explain the high cost of living. The 
increasing concentration of wealth in the hands of a compara- 
tively limited number creates a powerfully effective demand 



for luxuries and therefore inevitably turns production in that 
direction while the necessaries are neglected. This is the rea- 
son why the farmers' boys are leaving the old homestead and 
crowding into the cities where the money is. Instead of pro- 
ducing food we are making bottles of scent and such things be- 
cause the people who have the money to burn are ready to pay 
fancy prices for these articles. In fine, production in Califor- 
nia is not directed in the line of our vital needs, but is addressed 
to the creation of fads and fancies, frivols and furbelows. The 
woman who spends $100 for a hat is in that ratio the cause of 
the high price of eggs. In fact, a Los Angeles despatch printed 
a few days before Christmas told us : 

"Sick and penniless and out of a job, Mrs. Mary Erick- 
son hurled a brick through a store window to-day. She 
was arrested. The woman said her savings were gone and 
it was either jail or walk the streets. In the iail there 
would at least be the prospect of three meals a day. She 
said that she passed a cigar store where cigars were adver- 
tised at 25 cents each, and it seemed funnv that people 
could afford to pay 25 cents for cigars when she was starv- 
ing. Then she smashed the window." 
3 5 s 
The Trend of Production. 

It is an unsound economic condition wherein the follies of the 
idle rich are permitted so largely to determine the course of 
production. In this city people are paying $5 and $7.50 apiece 
for the privilege of occupying a seat in some fashionable res- 
taurant on New Year's eve, and the spectacle that results in- 
spires that stern, unbending moralist, Chester H. Rowell, with 
a wordy agony of long distance lamentation like this : 

"In San Francisco, so far as we have observed, the al- 
leged vulgar multitude is about as sober on New Year's 
night as on any other night in the year. But the ostensible 
aristocracy, being that portion of the population which 
parades its exclusiveness by seeking publicity and which 
frequents the restaurants where you have to pay $10 a table 
for the privilege of buying champagne at $5 a bottle, goes 
on a unanimous orgy every New Year's eve. Bluntly, but 
literally, San Francisco's smart set gets publicly drunk 
once a year. It is a custom and a privilege, in which the 
equality of the sexes prevails absolutely — and shockingly." 

To be sure, all this is wildly exaggerated nonsense, and we 
can make allowance for the fact that Rowell delights to lash 
the vices and follies of a great city because thereby he may 
compound for sins he is inclined to, by damning those he has 
no mind to. _ 

s s s 

The Social Splurge. 

The social splurge in the cities inspires "the climbers" on the 
outskirts of the swim to cultivate the art described by Thack- 
eray long ago of living well on nothing, or next to nothing a 
year. The other day a brief filed in Judge Graham's court re- 
lated how a defendant sought to evade payment for jewelry 
bought by his wife on the ground that the law does not compel 
a husband to pay for any articles but the necessaries of life 
purchased by his wife, and the brief went on to describe the 
transaction in these words: 



January 3, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



"Tradesmen are their legitimate and recognized prey. It 
is not the plumbers, bricklayers, carpenters, stevedores, 
practicing doctors, lawyers and • ther persons who really 
work who fill our courts with quantum valebat actions. 
It is this same would-be aristocracv. rushine from one field 
of credit to another — but always near or at one of the 
other of the so-called 'social centers' — with their perverted 
and un-American ideas, losing sight of the fact that the 
only aristocracy in America is the aristocracy of productive 
labor. The idea of a mechanic, laborer, doctor or lawyer 
coming into court in an action of this kind and trying to hide 
behind the skirts of his wife, trying to use the last shred 
of technicality afforded by the law to evade an obligation 
incurred by her for his benefit and of which he has admit- 
tedly received the benefit, is inconceivable. They would 
not have the unmitigated gall to face 3 court of justice 
with such a plea. An out and out crook would have taken 
the ring and left the country; what the defendant in this 
action would doubtless refer to as a 'common person' would 
have either paid the obligation or returned the ring." 
5 S S 

Tehama's White Elephant. 

In the meantime, while production is more and more turning 
in the direction of the luxuries, the load of taxation, State, muni- 
cipal and Federal, is constantly growing, and the taxpayers 
appear to be absolutely incapable of exercising any control of 
the process. The waste of public money is characteristic of al- 
most every transaction or operation committed to the conduct of 
our governing and administrative bodies. An amusing but in- 
structive example of the way in which the Supervisors of Te- 
hama County purchased a white elephant at the cost of the 
taxpayers is thus described in the Red Bluff News : 

"In a general way, these rains are a good thing for 
Tehama County. But it is blamed hard weather on our 
new rock crusher that is standing out in the mud, exposed 
to the elements. It is a perfectly good piece of machinery, 
too, that is to cost the taxpayers only $6,000. Of course, 
the fact is yet to be established that the crusher will crush 
rocks. The people of Los Molinos are so thoroughly satis- 
fied in their own minds that the thing will crush bridges 
that they rejected a demonstration. They wouldn't allow it 
taken over the Mill Creek bridge. It had to be taken to a 
ford. It would hardly be allowed on the bridge at Red 
Bluff. It weighs more than twelve tons. From this it will 
be noted that the crusher was purchased at a bargain. It 
costs only 25 cents a pound. That is cheaper than beef- 
steak. Cheaper because there is no money to operate it, 
and we are out only the first cost. There is some connec- 
tion between rock crushers and the high cost of living. This 
comes of the intimate relationship of taxes to men and 
property. The relationship is so vital that a Board of 
Supervisors cannot purchase a rock crusher, or a new safe, 
or build a wooden bridge without the foolish taxpayers 
setting it over against the cost of living." 
5 5 6" 

Sitting Out in the Wet. 

We are enjoying a healthy and happy rainy season, but in 
the meantime the Tehama County rock crusher has been sitting 
out in the wet, not having sense enough to come in when it 
rains, notwithstanding its uncomfortable position stuck in the 
mud where it cannot be budged without fear of its sinking out 
of sight. But as the News remarks in a vein of consolation for 
the taxpayers, "the rock crusher is good to look at," and fur- 
ther: 

"But in the meantime the rains are falling and the mud 
is getting deeper. All of which will enable us to grow more 
grass and put us in a better position to pay for all the 
things we are contracting. This again takes us back to the 
high cost of living." 

» S o- 

How Government Made an Island. 

Leaving the Tehama white elephant to repose in its muddy 
bed until the weather moderates, let us take a casual glance 



at the queer fashion in which public money was wasted ' 
ging the Alameda tidal canal. The work no doubt was done 
honestly, but the canal is useless in one way and a failure in 
another. Twenty-five or thirty years ago the government 
neers were obsessed with a quasi scientific theory of scouring 
action. Only give the tides or the streams fair play and they 
would automatically scour out their own beds. We used to hear 
in those days a great deal of this theory in the course of the 
once angry slickens controversy as applied to the bed of the 
Sacramento River. Only confine the current between narrow 
limits, and let Nature take its course. Thus the imprisoned 
river would gnaw its furious way through the slickens and the 
debris that was choking the life out of the stream and causing 
it to spread over all outdoors. But the plan did not work that 
way, and long ago the scouring theory was abandoned as a solu- 
tion for the flood and slickens problem. In fact, the engineers 
now propose to reverse the process and are engaged in giving 
the rivers more room to spread between banks. 
?r o" ?r 

Offspring of a Theory. 

But from this theory of scouring action sprang the Alameda 
tidal canal project. It was declared to the rivers and harbors 
committee with full conviction that if a clear water way were 
opened between the East Oakland basin and San Leandro Bay 
the tides would scour out the basin, and by the same operation 
an important artery of commerce would be created. In effect, 
the process worked the other way, and the only important re- 
sult was more mud. The flow of the tides carried still more silt 
into the East Oakland basin, where it settled in such measure 
that instead of creating a harbor, it began to take on the fea- 
tures of a reclamation project. The basin in those days was 
a favorite water for boating, and I vividly recall one afternoon 
being upset from a racing shell in the middle of the pool. There 
I stuck. The water was too shallow to swim, and the mud was 
too deep to walk. The mud was bottomless and soft, so that 
I dared not stand on it to right the shell, and I had to sit astride 
of the cranky thing until a man came off in a boat on an errand 
of rescue. That was what the tidal canal did in the way of 
scouring. Since that time, the dredgers have been at work to 
repair the damage. 

(Continued to Page 30.) 



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MR. PROPERTY OWNER 

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Nevada Bank Bldg., 14 Montgomery St. Phone Douglas 822 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 3, 1914. 




The dubious reception acorded to the double-barreled 

candidacy of Francis J. Heney by the Progressives displays, 
perhaps unconsciously, a painful and pained sense of embar- 
rassment. Heney is the bull in the political china shop, who 
butts in without invitation to muss things up. The Stockton 
Record, for instance, speaking for the Progressives generally, 
argues down this apparent sense of embarrassment, and appeals 
to the sacred spirit of the direct primary and the people's rule, 
so that fair play may be given Heney, and adds that "the 
Progressive party cannot be upbuilded by the tearing down of 
Mr. Heney." It is really painful — this sneaking ingratitude, 
and Heney's feelings can only be expressed by the famous mis- 
quotation: "How sharper than a thankless tooth it is to have 
a serpent child." 

Of course, Heney's offense is that he did not consult the 
grand supreme slatemaker. He was guilty of butting in before 
Hiram Johnson had pronounced sentence and given out the 
programme. He should have waited with bated breath and 
whispering humbleness for that backyard conference which 
Governor Johnson had announced he would hold with himself 
in the privacy of his San Francisco home. This is the first law 
of Progressive etiquette, and Heney breaks it at his peril. 

What is the programme ? The California Outlook, which 

may be regarded as close up with the inner councils of the pro- 
gressive party is smoothing the way in the very best and most 
approved political style for a ticket headed by Railroad Com- 
missioner Eshleman for Governor and Hiram Johnson for Sena- 
tor. Heney is not given so much as a look-in for anything, and 
Chester Rowell gets patted on the back because of the sub- 
missive and respectful fashion in which he retired from the 
Senatorial ring the instant it was intimated that Hiram Johnson 
wanted the job. Rowell knows his place. 

The Outlook further appeals to an amusing fiction of the 

geography of politics and insists that "another consideration 
frequently mentioned is the fact that Eshleman represents 
Southern California, which for many years has not provided 
the State with a Governor." This i? the customary sort of 
political guff that partisan organs peddle during campaigns. It 
is true that Eshleman does maintain a nominal residence in 
the Imperial Valley, but he is only a carpetbagger there at best, 
and he has been actually mixed up in the politics of the bay 
cities for years. 

It is a fact imparting a certain element of humor that this 

appeal to the geography of politics is made in terms of the 
old convention system, and the time when slates were made up 
by wicked men sitting in a back room and dividing up the 
nominations on a nicely adjusted sectional basis. The plan, of 
course, was merely a political dodge designed to catch votes 
by an appeal to local pride and the parochial sentiment. But 
it may be doubted whether this variety of bogus patriotism 
and narrow sentiment will weigh for much under the direct 
primary system. Consider the wisdom of heading your ticket 
with an appeal to catch the Imperial Valley vote. Yet this is 
what the Outlook describes as "another consideration frequently 
mentioned." 



Another consideration of far greater importance is the 

enhanced influence given to the newspapers by the operation 
of the direct primary. It is not at all that people vote accord- 
ing to what the press advises. Indeed, they very commonly re- 
ject such advice, as we have seen in a very striking fashion in 
[his city recently. But it is true that no man has a chance under 
the direct primary system unless he is well advertised. The 
limelight has become a vital adjunct of modern politics. It is 
true that publicity may ruin a man as easily as it can make 
him, but without it he is not in the running. 

Now, Heney has this advantage that he has had his fill 

of publicity, and this adds to the embarrassment of the Pro- 
gressive slate-makers over his intrusion, which they regard 
as nothing less than impudent. It's manners to wait till you're 
asked, they say, but indeed Heney never had any manners to 
speak of, and now gaily exploiting his alternative candidacy, 
he sings with Macbeth in the Beggars' Opera, "How happy 
could I be with either were t'other dear charmer away." 

Returning to the ever amusing Outlook, one learns that 

"as a consequence of the rather precipitate reckoning so largely 
indulged in, the probability of a contest between Mr. Rowell 
and Mr. Heney for the United States Senatorial nomination has 
arisen," but it is added by way of explanation and apology for 
this precipitancy let loose on a confused electorate without wait- 
ing for orders from above — it is added, I say, that "a return upon 
the part of the Progressive leaders to a closer consideration of 
the courtesies due Governor Johnson brought with it a cessa- 
tion of activities in this matter." Isn't that a lovely way of 
saying that all hands are waiting for word from the boss? Of 
course, we have been told that this is preeminently the day of 
the people's rule, but they must not be too precipitate lest they 
stumble and bruise themselves against a stone. And ambitious 
and aspiring candidates must beware the headlong precipitancy 
of Heney, and subdue their longings to the proper servility of 
Rowell. Blessed is he who takes a back seat when he is told. 

They take their weather prophets seriously in Sacra- 
mento. The Sunday before Christmas was assigned for an 
aviation meet in that neighborhood, and it was raining steadily 
on the Saturday. But the promoters of the meet, instead of 
invoking the services of the government forecaster, applied to 
Father Ricard, "the padre of the rains," and he graciously re- 
sponded that the storm was "passing away." As a matter of 
fact, it did rain some in Sacramento on the Sunday, but not 
much. It was a good guess for this uncertain and irresponsible 
season, which has made the official forecaster look foolish about 
three times a week. 

Sydney Van Wyck, a well-to-do barrister of this city, is 

devoting a full year to his political progress throughout the 
State from Siskiyou to San Diego, and from the Sierra to the 
sea. Mr. Van Wyck has started early and gives his whole time 
to his canvas for the Democratic nomination for Governor. It 
supplies a curious commentary on the working of thf direct 
primary system that a man must devote a full year to politics, 
neglecting all other business. The Los Angeles Graphic de- 
scribes Mr. Van Wyck's method, or one of his methods, as 
"holding the thought." That is to say, that when he has suffi- 
ciently impressed himself on the voters' sensibilities he always 
concludes with: "I am going to be the next Governor." This 
plan appears to be something like the application of Christian 
Science to politics. Mr. Van Wyck is mindful of the proveib 
that the early bird catches the worm, but ignores the converse 
of this wisdom that the early worm sometimes gets caught by 
the bird. 



January 3, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 




PL/DASUR.E/S WAND 

"We obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




PAUL GERSON. 



The Orpheum. 

With a solitary exception, the program this week is entirely 
new, and is set forth as the second edition of the Orpheum Road 
Show. Billy B. Van is the only holdover, and right merrily does 
he hold his own; in fact, he is without doubt the big feature of 
the bill. He has scored an emphatic success, the greatest of 
the kind the Orpheum has recorded for some time. Van is a 
true comedian of the rough type, and yet there is a large streak 
of tenderness in him, as witness his verses about his dog, which 
makes the eye glisten and a lump rise in the throat. Van is a 
whole show in himself. The Beaumont Sisters are competent 
assistants, and Jack Mclntyre gives an excruciatingly funny 



of the act now. She is a good comedienne, and she sings well 
and is a fine dancer. Mrs. Sully makes a hit of her own by 
bringing out the theatre property man and doing a tango with 
him. This Orpheum property chap is certainly a useful fellow. 
He has long since graduated from the amateur ranks as an ac- 
tor. He is a familiar figure to all the regulars of the Orpheum. 
Lew Hawkins is back again with a new budget of songs and 
a very funny monologue. His talk about woman suffrage is 
worth hearing. He deals with the matter entirely from a humor- 
ous standpoint, and thus offends nobody. Hawkins can always 
be depended upon to entertain during his twenty minutes in a 
way to make you wish he would remain longer. 




Scene trom Antony iimi Cleopatra, Kleine's magnificent spectacular production at the Savoy. 



characterization. Again I ask you not to miss seeing Billy Van. 
This is his last week. The first number brings out Lennett and 
Wilson, who perform all kinds of difficult gyrations on the 
bars. The comedian raises a good many laughs by his funny 
contortions. They finish their act in a regular whirlwind of 
difficult stunts which, of course, brings forth big applause. It is 
a splendid act of the kind. The three Dolce sisters present a 
very natty singing act. Their voices harmonize, and they make 
a number of costume changes. Then we have the five Sullys, 
showing again their former act entitled "The Information Bu- 
reau." Miss Sully has developed a L.eat deal, and is the life 



Catherine Countiss and a company of four people have a 
dramatic playlet which is called "The Birthday Present." Miss 
Countiss is an actress of ability. She is well known as leading 
woman with a number of well known stock companies, and has 
also headed her own organizations. Her vaudeville medium is 
quite good, though it lags in spots. The story is not exactly a 
Sunday school proposition, but it serves the purpose. Miss 
Countiss shows that she possesses abundant emotional ability, 
and she can rise to her big scenes with admirable repression. 
Anita Allen who enacts the French maid, is a San Francisco 
girl. Miss Allen is a dainty little miss and evinces much clever- 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 3, 1914. 



ness. An important character in the playlet is a child, imper- 
sonated by a youngster named Mac Macomber. John Lott, as 
the man, is a bit stiff, and his utterances are not always clear 
or understood. The playlet is interesting and effective. Lil- 
lian Herlein is a tall, statuesque lady with a good figure and 
looks, who sings well, and makes some remarkable changes of 
costumes. She keeps everybody interested, and her gorgeous 
raiment has everybody staring and commenting. Minita and 
Frederick Brad are eccentric acrobats. Their work is neat 
and clever. Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Crane are retained for a sec- 
ond week, and again exhibit their ball room dances. They are 
gradually assuming professional finish. Their dances are both 
graceful and highly attractive, and at this particular juncture, 
when locally we are literally dance mad, their work has especial 
emphasis and significance. The usual capacity houses are al- 
ways in evidence at the Orpheum. 



"The Girl at the Gate" at the Gaiety. 

The policy of giving a big show for little money is still the 
vogue at this theatre, where Irene Franklin is the particular star 
■)i the new company. Miss Franklin is too well known here, 
principally on account of her engagement but a few months ago 
at the Orpheum Theatre, where she broke the record by remain- 
ing three weeks; in fact, at that time Miss Franklin scored one 
of the biggest hits ever recorded at the Orpheum. Little won- 
der that we locally are happy to have her back with us for an 
extended engagement. "The Girl at the Gate" is a good old- 
fashioned musical comedy, written by Will Hough and the 
musical interpolations by Ben Jerome, both of whom are ex- 
perts in their work. The setting of the play is of special in- 
terest to our people, the first scene being placed at the Panama 
Canal, and the two succeeding scenes in our own town. Natu- 
rally, Miss Franklin, being the large feature, carries a big part 
of the burden of the success of the show on her shapely shoul- 
ders. We are given an opportunity to revel in all her well 
known song successes, and she also has a number of new ones, 
which are fully on a part with her former successes. Besides 
this, she wears some bewitching gowns, and manages to sustain 
the interest of the big show until the big finale in the last scene. 
Miss Franklin has far more than ordinary ability. She is a real 
comedienne, and is a character artist of the first class. Her 
good natured husband, Burt Breen, of course is at the piano, 
and incidentally Miss Franklin makes a valiant effort to make 
an actor of him by assigning him some lines, and truth to tell, 
he makes a big stagger at them. 

The comedy of the play is very timely, and there are any 
amount of new jokes, the comedian of the new company being 
none other than Walter Catlett, who is really a San Francisco 
boy, and who not so long ago emigrated East, where he gave the 
natives a sample of his ability, and they liked him, too. The 
fact that he is the principal comedian of this organization is 
evidence enough of his advancement. He has an able assistant 
in the person of Will Phillips. It is worth going to see Catlett 
dance. There is a tenor in the company, too, who is worth 
hearing. He has a sweet, sympathetic voice, and in the pret- 
tiest number of the evening, "The World's All Wrong," he is 
brought back time and time again. He is a sincere actor, too. 
Cathryn Palmer is an eccentric actress who is something of a 
novelty. She does not rely on appearance or dress to carry her 
on to the tide of success. She scores entirely on her ability to 
make people laugh, and next to Miss Franklin and Mr. Catlett 
she is one of the real successes of the evening. There is a very 
large cast of principals, and a chorus which has been recruited 
in San Francico, and which contains some stunning girls. The 
last scene depicts a stairway stretching from the footlights and 
raising tier upon tier to the back wall, reaching almost to the 
girders, and down this stairway come trooping the entire chorus 
of men and women garbed in dashing hussar uniforms, where 
they execute a number of evolutions. It is one of the handsom- 
est stage pictures we have seen here for some time, and natu- 
rally scores heavily. The costuming and the various changes 
of dress almost dazzles the eye, and monew has been spent 
with a lavish hand to make the production as complete as is 
possible. If you want to see a big, fine show for little money, 
and see clever Irene Franklin at her very best, do not miss 
seeing "The Girl at the Gate." 



Columbia. — The Columbia Theatre will be dark during the 
week of Monday, January 5th, the musical production, "A 
Broadway Honeymoon," which was to have appeared, having 
closed its tour in Chicago. 

On Monday, January 12th, the first presentation in the West 
of the great attraction, Otis Skinner in "Kismet," will take 
place at the Columbia Theatre. Klaw & Erlanger and Harri- 
son Grey Fiske's production of "Kismet" brings forward Otis 
Skinner in a role unlike any that he has played before, but that 
includes in its requirements almost every style and quality of 
acting of which Mr. Skinner is master. 

Mail orders for the Otis Skinner engagement will not be ac- 
cepted by the management unless said orders are accompanied 
by the necessary funds and self-addressed stamped envelope. 
The sale of seats will begin on Tuesday morning, January 6th, 

two days in advance of the regular advance sale date. 

* * * 

Kohler & Chase Hall. — The program prepared by the man- 
agement of the Kohler & Chase Matinees of Music for the first 
event in the new year, which will take place on Saturday after- 
noon, January 3d, will be one of the most artistic and best 
selected given at Kohler & Chase Hall. The soloist who has 
been engaged for this occasion will be Miss Anita Olmsted, 
soprano. This exceedingly brilliant young vocalist is not a 
stranger to the concert goers of this city for she has appeared 
with great success at several recitals of her own, as well as 
before the prominent musical clubs. In every instance she has 
impressed her audiences with the beauty of her voice and the 
intelligence of her interpretations. She is a very interesting 
singer of ballads and arais, and never fails to delight because 
of her conscientious work. Miss Olmsted will sing songs by 
Thomas, Speaks, Cadman and D'Hardelot. Compositions will 
be interpreted on the Knabe Player Piano and the Pipe Organ. 



MAGAZINE FOR LOCAL ADVERTISERS. 

Louis Honig is the editor of a handsomely printed and well 
written magazine published in this city and entitled "Practical 
Advertising." The magazine not only gives timely advice 
written by an expert on the uses of publicity, but gives the cur- 
rent news of the advertising world in a compact form. The 
number contains besides a great many very readable adver- 
tisements of local and foreign enterprises which are in them- 
selves excellent reading. 



SATURDAY MORNING AT 
— — — 9 A. M. - — 

Our Mid -Winter 
Clearance Sale 

begins with radical reductions effecting every 
article in the store. 

The woman who desires a suit, coat 
or dress to tide her over to the Spring 
Season, will find it advantageous to investigate. 



THE NEW YORK CLOAK & SUIT 


HOUSE 


974 MARKET STREET 




Bet. Mason and Taylor 





January 3, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



11 



KATHRYN JONES WILSON RUN DOWN BY AN AUTO, 
BUT WILL RECOVER. 

Kathryn Jones Wilson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred S. 
Wilson, of 176 Fifteenth avenue, was seriously injured 
last week by being run down by an auto delivery. The latest 
news received by this office was to the effect that little Miss 
Wilson would recover. She is being attended by Dr. William 
P. Harvey. 

This child, while but six years old, has had wide experience. 
She has crossed the continent three times, has covered the dis- 
tance between New York and Chicago eleven times, has 
stopped and is known by most everybody from bell-boys to 




Kathryn Jones Wilson, who was seriously injured last week. 

management in most of the large hotels in the United States. 
Aside from being of a wonderful disposition and accomplished, 
she is said to be one of the most beautiful children in America. 
Miss Wilson is quite expert as a swimmer, and has bathed in 
the Atlantic, Pacific and the Great Lakes, and is frequently seen 
in the Lurline Baths. She is a native of New Jersey. Mr. Wil- 
son is vice-president of the Thermoid Rubber Co., known all 
over the world because of their brake lining of the same name. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wilson and their daughter have decided on 
San Francisco as their future home. 



FOREST NOTES. 

The forest products laboratory at Madison, Wisconsin, has 
made 4,000 tests on the strength of American woods. 

Thirty different wood preservatives are in commercial use in 
the United States. Many of them utilize creosote of one sort 
or another; others require chemical salts. 

Last year the forest service distributed 116,000 basket willow 
cuttings: 15,000 to forest schools, 20,000 to agricultural experi- 
ment stations, and 81,000 to individuals. 

More than 800,000 horsepower has been developed from 
streams on national forests under government regulation. This 
represents the output under conditions of lowest stream flow. 

Florida buttonwood, a tree confined largely to the keys along 
the south coast, is very highly prized for use in cooking on 
ship's galleys. It burns slowly with an even heat, and makes 
but little smoke or ash. 



LONDON SHOPS AND CLERKS. 

In the stores in London the clerks first attracted my attention, 
but I may say the stores and shops themselves, after New York, 
seemed small and old. New York is so new; the space given 
to the more important shops is so considerable. In London 
it struck me that the space was not much, and that the wood- 
work and walls were dingy. One can tell by the feel of a place 
whether it is exceptional and profitable, and all of these were 
that; but they were dingy. The English clerk, too, had an air 
of civility, and I had almost said servility, which was different. 
—From Theodore Dreiser's "A Traveler at Forty." 

The succession of important banquets recently given at 

Techau Tavern included a most elaborate dinner given by Hol- 
brook, Merrill & Stetson to their employees last Saturday night. 
The conduct of the banquet was in the hands of the traveling 
salesmen of the firm, who officiated as speech makers, toast 
master, etc. Covers were laid for one hundred and one guests, 
and the management of the Tavern surpassed its own high 
standard in performing its part of the program. The customary 
souvenirs presented to lady patrons on Saturday afternoon con- 
sisted this week of bottles of Parfum Mary Garden, an always 
acceptable gift. 



SYMphoNY 

u ORCHESTRA 

He/iky Hadley Conductor. 



Orpheum 



CORT-FRIDAY. JANUARY 9. 3 P. M.. SOLOIST - KATHLEEN 

PAR LOW (Violinist) 
Tickets 75c to $2.00! Box. Loge Seats $3.00. Seats on sale Monday at Box 

(> 'l sSlipnnnn, Clay & Co.. KohliT A C hase. Cort Theatre. 

O'Farrell Street Bet. Stocktonand Powell 
Phone Douglas 70 

Safest and Most Magnificent Theatre in America 
Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

THE PINNACLE OF VAUDEVILLE 
HORACE OOLDIN. The Royal Illusionist presenting in three series "The Old 
and the New— And a Tiger God Too:" MAUDE MULLER ,t ED. STANLEY 
Comic Opera Fun Makers; MR. A MRS. FREDERICK ALLEN in (heir now 
comedy, "She Had To Tell Him;" BOUDINI BROTHERS. Masters of the 
Accordeon; JOE SHRTNER <S DOLLRICHARDS "Bits of Nonsense;" TRYON'S 
DOGS Featuring "Hector" the Calculating Marvel; THE FIVE SULLYS; 
WORLDS NEWS IN MOTION VIEWS; Last Week LILLIAN HERLEIN In a 

Song Novelty. 

Evening prices. 10c. 25c. 50c, 75c. Box seats, $1. Matinee prices 

(except Sundays and holidays). 10c. 25c. 50c. 

O'Farri'll. Opposite Orpheum 
rhone Sutter II u 



Gaiety Theatre 



America's Must Popular Comcilicnni' 

IRENE FRANKLIN 
Supported by 60 Comedians, Singers ami Dancers in the Musical Merriment 

THE GIRL AT THE GATE 
Another $2,00 Worth lor $1.1*. 

PRICES— Nights, Saturday and Sunday Mati 9, 25c to $1.00; Thursday 

Matinee. 28c, BOo, 75c 



Alcazar Theatre 



O'Farrell Street m-ar Powell 
Phone Kearny 2 

mmeneing Monday Night. January 6th. Matinees Thursday. Satur- 
day an«i Sunday 

EVELYN VAUGHAN-BERT LYTELL 
An. I the Alcattr Players will offer an unusual I'lay of strong dramatic interes t 

"THE COUNTRY BOY" 
Kdgar Selwyn's T.iherty Theatre. N. Y. Success. Its First Production in 
Si.u-k and at Popular I'm 

Prices— Night. 26c to$l: Mat. 26c to . r >0c. 

'i h< Plaj house Beautiful" 
McAllister St. near Mark.-t 
Phone Market 130 
This and Fo-IDOITOfl AftemOOM and Evening*— Last Tim.- of 

"MUTT AND JEFF IN PANAMA" 
Commencing Monday. January 6— Twice Daily, at 2:30 and 8 :8D Mr. George 
Kieine Presents 

"ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA" 
The U m ular Productions, in fl Parts. 

ts Reserved, 25c, an 



Savoy Theatre 



HOTEL SHATTUCK 

FIREPROOF 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Thirty-five Minutes From San Francisco 

$3.00 per day American Plan $1.50 per day European Pla 



Gouraud's Oriental Beauty Leaves 

A dainty little booklet of exquisitely perfumed powdered leaves to 
carry In the purse. A handy article for all occasions to quickly Im- 
prove the complexion. Sent for 10 cents In stamps or coin. F. T. Hop. 
kln», 57 Great Jonea SL, N. J. 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 3, 1914. 




The bells that "ring out the old, ring in the new" will not 
have a chance to die on the confetti laden air before the first 
sweet sound of the wedding bells sounds on the orange blos- 
som scented air. The first wedding of the season is buttoned to 
the calendar with the bright brass buttons of the army, and all 
decorated in gold braid. At a brilliant military wedding on 
January 3d in St. Brigid's Church, Miss Cali Phillips, daughter 
of Colonel and Mrs. Charles Phillips, will become the bride 
of Lieutenant Ralph Chrystal Harrison. The families of both 
the bride and groom have many affiliations in the town set, so 
the assemblage will be thoroughly representative of town soci- 
ety as well as the army. 

On January 7th, Miss Eliza McMullin and Jean Gallois will 
plight their troth at a very quiet ceremony at the home of the 
bride's mother in Piedmont. The Gallois family is still in 
mourning, which precludes any of the fuss and feather of a 
highly decorative wedding ceremony with bridesmaids and 
groomsmen peopling the foreground with the bride and groom. 
This is the second marriage within the year in the Gallois fam- 
ily, the only daughter, charming Jeanne, having married Horace 
Hill, Jr., during the twelfth month. Young Gallois has won one 
of the most attractive girls in the younger set. She is the de- 
scendant of a family famous for its beautiful women, and is a 
petite and piquant replica of the family type, which in the days 
when "the four McMullin sisters" were belles dominated the 
vision of most of the beaux in town. Both the Gallois and the 
McMillan families are delighted with the prospect of being 
united through the marriage of these young people. The bride 
and groom will sail for Europe on the 14th for a prolonged 
honeymoon trip to the old world. 

February is not attuned so gayly to wedding bells as usual. 
In fact, there is so far only one wedding of distinction calen- 
dared for the month which, as a rule, shows several. Whatever 
the reason, it is an indisputable fact that the season so far has 
not been prolific in romance. Whether it is the reduction in the 
tariff, the tango, or the gradual change in the climate owing to 
the Japanese current, let none but Cupid decide. Suffice it to 
stare the fact in the face that engagement announcements come 
with much less regularity than is becoming a perfectly good 
season. So February stretches on the immediate horizon with 
only one marriage scroll unrolled for all the army and navy set, 
and not a few of the elite of the townspeople to read. Miss 
Sadie Murray, the daughter of the Commanding General at 
Fort Mason, will become the wife of Lieutenant Pratt at a mili- 
tary wedding which will have the picturesque setting of Fort 
Mason for a background. Comes now a long stretch of months 
undecorated with any wedding preparations. Of course, one 
can never tell what surprises may be sprung, but at present 
writing there is a dearth of announcements until spring blithely 
pokes up its head and shows possibilities of some very gala 
weddings like that of Vera de Sabla and Herbert Payne, which 
will be celebrated in the magnificent manner that one of the 
handsomest homes and plumpest purses on the peninsula ad- 
mits. Helen Stone and Grayson Hinckley are likewise plan- 
ning to be married in the spring. Helen Nicol and Ensign 
Nielson have not yet set a date for their wedding, awaiting fur- 
ther news of future sailing orders. The marriage of the young 
daughter of the Charles Stetson Wheelers and Bradway Head 
will not be celebrated for a year or more— this is a college ro- 
mance supplemented by acquaintance under the hospitable roof 
of Mrs. Hearst at Hacienda del Posa at Pleasanton, where the 
young people have been frequent house guests. Head is the 
son of the late Colonel Head of Arizona, a well known mining 
man and brother of the capitalist who, for many years was a 
prominent figure in the business life of San Francisco. After 
the death of Colonel Head, his widow who, before her marriage, 
was a protege of Mrs. Hearst, came to Berkeley to live, and 
with her son Bradway has been a welcome house guest of Mrs 
Hearst. 



While there are few definite announcements for the match- 
makers to cuddle to their hearts, there are any number of in- 
definite signs and symbols for those who can read messages in 
falling stars and floating straws and fickle fol-de-rols. For ex- 
ample, at a luncheon given for one of the debutantes the other 
•day, a professional palmist who reads life lines with greatest 
fluency, announced that she could see Marion Zeile approach- 
ing the altar on the distinguished arm of a scion of foreign no- 
bility, and those who know, say that the Count has been most 
attentive in his floral offerings to the young lady who met with 
a rather serious accident the other day. Miss Zeile and her 
cousin, Mrs. Fred McNear, were returning from a shopping ex- 
pedition when their automobile collided with a street car and 
succeeded in giving altogether too realistic an imitation of 
what looked like a fatal accident. But fortunately it was not 
so serious as it seemed at first, and both of the victims of the 
affair are now able to enjoy convalescence and the attentions 
of her friends, whereas for a few days they were too ill to see 
any one. Mrs. McNear is one of the very few motor experts 
among the women. There are many who can run a car with . 
assurance and skill, but few who can take them to pieces like 
Mrs. McNear and put them together again with all the expert- 
ness of a mechanician who understands every squeak of the 
complicated insides of the car and knows how to doctor it up. 
After the big fire, Mrs. McNear went about the business of 
fixing up a car of her father's which refused to budge for any 
one else, and by speaking to it firmly but gently in its own 
language, sent it spining down the road. So it is the irony of 
the inappropriate that she she be mixed up in a motor car acci- 
dent of this sort. 

© © © 

The New York despatches state that Amy Crocker-Three- 
More-Names is going to take unto herself a fourth name, and 
the husband that goes with this passion for collecting names. 
The news is verified by a letter to a friend here, in which she 
states that her interest in this Russian began when she 
observed his fondness for her pet snake. Among the minor 
eccentricities of this lady is a fad for going about with her pet 
snake coiled over her arm. It sounds like a press agent's story, 
but any number of Californians have returned from Paris with 
weird accounts of seeing this inconspicuous person dining in a 
fashionable cafe with her pet wound around her bare arm. The 
snake is so well trained that it never creates a disturbance of 



A Hub Sale 


Man's Greatest Opportunity to 
Clothe Himself 


1072 Overcoats 


1147 Suits 


At the Following Revised Prices : 


Suits and overcoats worth up to 
$25 now for $19 


Suits and overcoats worth up to 
$35 now for $23 


Suits and overcoats worth up to 
$45 now for $28 


Suits and overcoats worth up to 
$60 now for $33 


The # tab 


Crjas.Keilus & Co.iino 


726- MARKET STREET 



January 3, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



any kind, although the only excuse that one can conjure for the 
management permitting the lady to wear it is that the presence 
of this muchly married Californienne at a public place is a 
good advertising card even though it does bring with it much 
criticism. 

9 9 © 

George Nickel is entertaining a house party at one of the Lux 
ranches in the San Joaquin Valley. The Templeton Crockers 
and Marian Newhall went down in the big touring car with him, 
and at the ranch they were joined by the Sam Morses, who have 
a place near Merced. The party will be the guests of the 
Morses before returning home. Miss Newhall still remains the 
most baffling beauty in the smart set, upsetting the accurate 
calculations of the most scientific investigators into the cardiac 
affairs of belles and beaux, so it is useless to attach any par- 
ticular significance to this expedition. 

The set that is still in the school room and college has had 
a wonderful holiday, and when the young people start East 
again in a day or two, they will carry excess baggage stories 
of good times. The Will Crockers started the ball rolling with 
a dance at New Place for their daughter and son, who are in 
Boston, and every night since there has been a dancing frolic. 
On Monday night of this week, the Mountford Wilsons and Joe 
Grants were joint hostesses at a dance at the Burlingame club- 
house for this sub-set that must spend a little more time in the 
halls of learning. On Tuesday night, the William Sproules had 
a dancing party for Mrs. Sproule's youngest daughter, Miss 
Marie Baldwin, who is at Miss Spences' in New York. Mrs. 
Oyster claimed Wednesday evening for the same fortunate set 
of young people, and the next night the Louis Monteagles gave 
a dance at the Century Club for their young son. Mrs. Ru- 
dolph Lichtenberg made the Fairmont the scene of her party 
in honor of Miss Kathleen Coleman, to which dance all the 
members of the Junior Assembly were bidden. On New Year's 
day the younger set foregathered at the De Pue home in Sac- 
ramnto street. Miss Marian Crocker was the guest of honor, 
this distinction coming to her because she is not going off to 
school with the rest of the youngsters, who leave in a day or 
two, but is bound for an extended trip abroad, sailing with her 
mother, Mrs. Henry Crocker, for Cairo, via the Mediterra- 
nean trip. Her brother and two sisters will cross the continent 
with them, but will wave farewells at New York and return to 
their respective school rooms. The dancing fad in the East is 
just as intense as here in San Francisco, so these young people 
did not have to be initiated into the fascinations of the new 
dances, but whirled off in the dips and glides of the tango just 
as soon as their feet touched the floor. A number of them are 
planning to travel eastwards together, which means a continu- 
ous frolic from here to New York. 



Miss Clayes will hold her first annual sale of curios and 

applied art works during the month of January at her rooms, 
401-404 Liebes Building, 177 Post street, near Grant avenue. 
An opportunity will be afforded to select and acquire objects 
of art and curios at a special discount, and all sorts of bargains 
may be had in the way of household decoration and interior 
furnishing of an artistic character. A visit to these rooms and 
an inspection of the exhibits on view are quite worth while. 



One of Breuer's big canvases can be framed by E. B. 

Courvoisier as expeditiously and as satisfactorily as a little 
Copley print, or a monotype by Xavier Martinez. A wide and 
exclusive collection of framing materials. 431 Sutter street. 

(AdrerttMmtnt) 





J& 


Maker Mai 


©ssagiMir ©if r.apaskm IFYscBss 


EUSniom Ale 


Scottish Rite Temple, Van Xess and Sutter 


Just Opened 


Telephone Prospect . 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

Union Square 

A delightful contribution to (he charm of life in 
cosmopolitan San Francisco. 

M. MAURICE AND FLORENCE WALTON, 

The world's greatest rhythmic dancers 

In the Rose Room, Herter's sensuously beautiful 
decorative achievement, during supper, commenc- 
ing January twelfth. 

Under the Management of James Woods 



RESERVE YOUR TABLES FOR THE 

"THES DANSANTS" 

ON SATURDAY AFTERNOONS 
FROM 4 TO 7 

IN THE 

PALACE HOTEL COURT 



HOTEL OAKLAND SS, 

BUSINESS AND SOCIAL CENTER OF OAKLAND 

Every one of its 450 rooms has outside exposure. (No court 
rooms.) Rates $1.50 per day and upwards. European Plan. 
Advantageous rates to permanent guests. Service and Cuisine 
unsurpassed. 

FREE BUS MEETS TRAINS 
Under Management of VICTOR REITER 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

125 miles south from San Francisco. 
Finest all grass Golf Course in Califor- 
nia. Daily rates, $5, $6, $7 per day. 
Special monthly rates. 

PACIFIC GROVE HOTEL 

Three miles by trolley from DEL 
MONTE, under same management. 
Daily rates $2.50 to $4 per day. 
Special monthly rates. 



Above hotels are under the management of 

H. R. WARNER, Del Monte, California 



FIRST ANNUAL SALE 

DURING JANUARY 
A special discount on all curios and present 
stock of 

APPLIED ART WORK 

MISS CLAYES 

401-404 Liebes Building, 177 Post St., near Grinl Aveme 



Mrs. Marie Read Miss Joseohine K. Fischer 

"IJf Oitft and Jamnir £>bap" 

Applied Art Needle Work Hand Painted China 

Occasion Cards and other Artistic Novelties 

ROOM 321. HASTINGS BUILDING 

Phone Douglas 2830 

162 POST STREET AT GRANT AVE.. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 3, 1914. 




socm 



An noun cement* suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear In the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 




ENGAGEMENTS. 

CLARKE-CHANDLER.— Miss Belle Clarke has announced her engage- 
ment to Mr. Asa C. Chandler. No date has been set for the wedding. 

DECKER-WALKER.— Prom the East comes the news of the engagement 
of Miss Mary Decker and J. Walker of Philadelphia. No date has been 
set for the wedding. 

EVERETT-TABER. — Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Everett announce the engage- 
ment of their daughter. Miss Louise Relief Everett,, to Loren Bennett 
Taber. 

GAINER-WISNOM.— The engagement of Miss Evelyn Claire Gainer and 
Samuel A Wisnom, both well known in San Mateo, was announced 
on Christmas eve. 

GARDINER-HARRISON.— Miss Marjorie Gardiner announced her en- 
gagement to Lieutenant W. C. Harrison, U. S. A., at a tea given one 
day this week. 

WEIL-LATZ.— Mr. and Mrs. L. Weil announce the engagement of their 
daughter, Miss Marie, to H. Lou Latz. 

WEYL-BROWN. — Mr. and Mrs. D. Weyl of Chicago announce the engage- 
ment of their daughter. Miss Irma Weyl. to Arthur Brown. 

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

BASCH-KAHN.— The marriage of Miss Essae Basch and Mr. Leo Katan 
will be solemnized at the home of the bride's sister. Mrs. B. Barlash, 
in Third avenue, on New Tear's night. 

CHERRY-WELLS.— The wedding of Miss Ina Cherry to Ernest Wells, a 
young attorney of Washington, will be an event of New Year's day at 
the home of Mrs. J. M. Cherry in Berkeley. 

DANIELS-BLACK. — Miss Vera Daniels* marriage to Frederick Black of 
San Jose will take place January 16th at the home of her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. G. B. Daniels, on Howe street. 

DONOHO-BABCOCK. — Miss Hazel Elliott Donoho, daughter of Mrs. Wm. 
Donoho, and Mr. David Thornton Babcock will be married on January 
1st at Grace Pro-Cathedral at four o'clock in the afternoon. 

HILL-WEST. — Pretty Florence Hill has chosen the first day of the year 
lor her wedding to Harry G. West, and the ceremony will take place 
at the home of her parents. Mr. and Mrs. John C. Hill, in East Oak- 
land. Rev. Dr. Dille will read the service. 

McMULLIN-GALLOIS. — On January 7th, Miss Eliza McMullin will be- 
come the bride of Jean Gallois of San Francisco at a quiet wedding at 
the home of her mother. Mrs. Jos. H. Harris, on Vernon Heights. 

RICHARDSON-PARKINSON. — The wedding of Miss Dorothy Richardson 
to Jack Parkinson will take place on the 21st of the month at the 
Richardson home in San Rafael. 

STRINGHAM-DE WITT.— The date for the wedding of Miss Harriet 
Stringham, daughter of the late Professor Irving D. Stringham and 
Mrs. Stringham, to Rev. Dr. William De Witt of New York, has been 
set for January 6th. The ceremony will be celebrated in the chape) at 
St Mark's Episcopal Church In Berkeley. 

WEDDINGS. 

ABBOTT-ERLIN. — Mrs. Susan Abbott and Mr. J. Theo Erlin were mar- 
ried on Christmas eve at the home of the bride's brother. William M. 
Abbott. 

AMMON-GUNN. — Miss Elinor Ammon, daughter of William Ammon. of 
Newcastle, became the wife of Dr. Herbert Gunn of this city at the 
home of the bride's father in Auburn on Tuesday evening. 

BASSETT-HEACOCK. — Miss Ida Bassett. of Santa Cruz, and Ray B. Hea- 
cock, of San Francisco, were married Saturday, December 20th, at 
the chapel of the Cathedral Mission of the Good Samaritan. 

BRUCE-MATTSON.— Miss Jean Bruce, of Menlo Park, was married last 
Tuesday to Dr. Guy Mattson of San Francisco. 

CALVIN -LA WHENCE.— The marriage of Miss Caroline Calvin, the sec- 
ond daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Calvin of this city, and Mr. Geo. 
Nelson Lawrence, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Lawrence of Salt 
Lake City, took place last night at the Calvin residence in Sacra- 
mento street. 

KNOWLTOX-ELKHART.— The wedding of Miss Grace Knowlton and 
Nelson A. Eckhart was celebrated in the office of Trinity Church Fri- 
day afternoon, Rev. Frederick W. Clampett officiating. 

WEBSTER-ERLIN. — Mrs. Susan Abbott Webster became the wife of Z. 
Theodore Erlin, a leader In club and financial circles of this city, at a 
quiet home wedding celebrated at the home of her brother, William 
M. Abbott, on Wednesday evening of last week. 

WHITE- PEG RAM.— Miss Gwendolyn White and Lieutenant John C. Pe- 
gram, IT. S. A., were married quietly last Saturday afternoon at 
Thousand Oaks, Berkeley. 



DANCES. 



GRANT. — Most enthusiastic are the young people in their accounts of the 

delightful dance given Monday evening in Burlingame by Mrs. Joseph 

D. Grant and Mrs. Mountford S. Wilson. 
HARRIS. — Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence W. Harris gave a dinner dance Wed- 
nesday evening for Mr. and Mrs. Baker, who saw the old year out with 

friends. 
LADIES' ENDEAVOR SOCIETY.— A concert, to be followed by a dance, 

will be given by the Ladies' Endeavor Society Sunday evening, Janu- 
ary 25. 1914, at Scottish Rite Hall. 
MARSHALL. — Mr. and Mrs. John W. Marshall gave a dance at their home 

last Saturday night, entertaining about forty at their attractive home 

out in West Clay Park district. 
MILLER. — Miss Elgie Elspetch Miller was hostess last Saturday evening 

at a delightful dance to a hundred of the younger set at her home in 

California street. 
MAILLARD. — Miss Lee Maillard, the young daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 

John W. Maillard. was the complimented guest at a handsome dancing 

party which the latter gave at the Maillard home. 
OYSTER.— Mrs. Joseph S. Oyster, assisted by Mrs. Alfred L. Tubbs and 

Mrs. William Tubbs, entertained the debutantes in honor of Miss 

Elizabeth Oyster this week with a dance, 
PENINSULA HOTEL. — A merry party of San Mateans will dance the old 

year out and the new year In at the Peninsula Hotel. 
SOMERS. — Miss Helen Stone and her fiance, Grayson Hinckley, were the 

complimented guests at a dance given by Mr. and Mrs. Roy Somers, 

at their home In Jackson street, on Monday of last week. 
SPROUTjE. — At the home of Mr. and Mrs. William sproule, the school set 

.njoyed a merry dance this week, which was preceded by a dinner 

party for about seventy. 
TYSON. — Wednesday night a number of the belles and their escorts 

i -rossed the bay to be present at the dance and cabaret entertainment 

which Mr. and Mrs. James Tyson and Miss Marie Tyson gave at their 

home in Alameda. 
WARD.— Hiss Dorothy Ward, the daughter of Dr. Florence Ward, shared 

the prestige of being hostess at her first dame, Riven at the I Ot 

her mother in Broadway this week. 

TEAS. 

CHICKERING.— Mrs. Martha Breevort, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
Breevort, of New Tork. will be guest of honor at a bridge tea which 
Mrs. Harry Chickering and Miss Florence Henshaw will give on the 6th 
of the month. 

DE PUE. — The Misses Corennah and Elva de Pue will give a tea on New 
Year's day in honor of Miss Marian Crocker, who is leaving soon for 
Egypt. 

HENSHAW. — Miss Florence Henshaw has issued invitations for a bridge 
tea to be given on Tuesday, January 6th. Miss Martha Brevort of 
New York, who Is spending the winter with her family at the Fair- 
mont will be the complimented guest. 

ST. JOHN. — Miss Geraldlne St. John is planning to give an elaborate tea 
the middle of the month, to welcome her cousin. Miss Marguerite 
Gaffey, who is coming up from Los Angeles to spend a month or so 
here. 

DINNERS. 

McMULLIN. — Miss Eliza McMullin and Mr. John Gallois were guests of 
honor at a dinner party at the Bohemian Club on Friday night of last 
week. 

PIKE. — Mr. and Mrs. George Barr Baker, who arrived a few days before 
Christmas, are being constantly entertained by their many friends. 
They wore* ttie honored guests at a dinner party last Saturday even- 
ing, when Mr. and Mrs. Roy M. Pike entertained a dozen friends in 
their new home In Pacific avenue. 

POCKWITZ. — Mrs. Leon Pockwitz was hostess Saturday at one of the 
tables at the dansant at the Palace, and frequently entertains at in- 
formal dancing parties. 

REES. — Colonel and Mrs. Thomas Rees, who entertain so often and so 
delightfully, have invited twelve friends for dinner on the first day 
of 1914. 

WEILL. — Another wonderful occasion at the Bohemian Club was the bride 
dinner that Mr. Raphael Weill gave on Friday night ot last week in 
honor of Miss Eliza McMullin and John Gallois. 

BIRTHDAY PARTIES. 

BRIDGES. — Mrs. J. H. Bridges and Mrs. M. E. Coker gave a delightful 
party last Friday evening at the Gates Hotel in honor of Mr. and Mrs. 
.J. H. Bridges' grandson. Frank Holiday, Jr.'s, first birthday, and Bax- 
ter Coker's nineteenth birthday. 

LINDBLOM. — Miss Lindblom was the honored guest at a most enjoyable 
affair given by a number of club friends of the city recently, who ar- 
ranged a surprise birthday party. 



LUNCHEONS. 

LAINE. — In honor of the debutantes, one of the splendid occasions of the 
week was the big luncheon party which Miss Otilla Laine gave at the 
Fairmont on Monday of last week. 



SUPPER PARTIES. 
LA MONTAIGNE. — Mr. Clinton La Montaigne was host last Saturday 
evening at a theatre and supper party in honor of Miss Elizabeth 
Oyster. 



January 3, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



RECEPTIONS 
PROCTOR.— Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Proctor and the latter's mother. Mrs. 

C. P. MacDermot, will give a New Year's reception at their home in 

Oakland. 
SMITH.— The engag nent reception for Miss Harriet Porcher Smith, of 

Santa Rosa, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John GaUliard Smith, and i >r. 

Stephen Wythe of Oakland, was attended by scores of prominent 

society folk of this city and the bay cities. 

JANUARY 1ST. 

BASSETT. — Miss Amy Bassett entertained her friends at her home in 
Union street on January 1st. 

BOYD. — Mr. and Mis. John F. Boyd and Miss Louise Boyd opened their 
San Rafael residence, and all the Marin County contingent assembled 
there on New Year's Day. 

FBNWICK. — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Fenwick greeted their friends 
at their home, where the traditional egg nog was dispensed. 

FORD. — Mr. and Mrs. Alfred B. Ford asked a few friends to drop in in- 
formally New Year's day to greet and congratulate Miss Margaret 
Belden and their son, Mr. Sidney Ford, whose engagement has re- 
cently been announced. 

KITTLE. — Mrs. Jonathan Kittle was hostess to her friends on New Year's 
day, having asked them to drop in at about four o'clock. 

MARTIN. — Mrs. Eleanor Martin, assisted by Mrs. J. Downey Harvey, 
Mrs. Oscar Cooper and Mrs. Ward Barron, was at home at the Martin 
residence in Broadway. 

MONTEAGLE. — The Louis F. Monteagle family greeted their friends at 
Century Club. 

VINCENT. — Mr. and Mrs. Germaine Vincent were at home to their 
friends at their apartments in Broderick street. 

ARRIVALS. 

BALFOUR. — Sir Robert Balfour arrived from the East last week, having 
crossed the continent in order to spend Christmas with Lady Bal- 
four at the Fairmont. 

CHIPMAN. — Dr. and Mrs. Ernest Dwlght Chipman have come to San 
Francisco for the winter season, and will not re-open their home in 
Ross Valley until next summer. 

CLARK. — Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Clark, Miss Helen Clark and Edward, 
Jr., arrived from New York Wednesday, and are at the Pleasanton. 

CROCKER.— The Messrs. Wm. W. Crocker and Mountford S. Wilson re- 
turned on Tuesday from Yale to spend the holidays in Burlingame. 

DYER. — Mrs. A. B. Dyer, wife of Colonel Dyer, U. S. A., retired, is spend- 
ing the holidays in San Francisco as the guest of Miss Genevieve 
Cook at her home on Leavenworth street, 

HUTCHINSON.— Mrs. Joseph Kellogg Hutchinson, who has been in Los 
Angeles for some days, has returned to her home in this city. 

JOHNS. — Mr. and Mrs. Johns are again at their home in Crystal Springs 
Road, San Mateo. 

JOHNSON. — Mrs. Frank S. Johnson has returned from Europe, where she 
spent the summer, and is at the Fairmont Hotel with her son, Mr. 
Gordon Johnson. 

LANGHORNE.— Mrs. James Potter Langhorne has returned from An- 
napolis, where she has been spending the past three months with 
her daughters. 

LATTCUIRIS.— Mrs. E. A. Laughris. of Seattle, is the holiday guest of her 
sister, Mrs. E. H. Ault, who is stopping at the Perlchon House. 

LINDBLOM.— Miss Brita Llndblom. daughter of E. O. Lindblom. the 
San Francisco banker, is again at her home in Berkeley. 

LOCKER. — Mrs. Walter Locker and her daughter. Miss Edith Locker, of 
Los Angeles, are guests of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brown of Redwood 
City. 

MANNING.— Mrs. Guy Manning, who has spent the last week in Reno, 
has returned to San Francisco. 

MARONEY. — Miss Marie Genevieve Maroney lias arrived from the East 
and is the guest of her brother-in-law and sister. Mr. and Mrs. E. W. 
Thomas, at the Douglas Apartments In Hyde Street 

MICHAEL. — Mr. and Mrs. Dave Michael have returned from Honolulu, 
where a very enjoyable sojourn was spent. 

McENERY. — Dr. Walter Mi Knery arrived Tuesday from Europe, and Is 
being cordially greeted by his many friends. 

RICHARDSON.— Mrs. u. R. Richardson is home from a visit with her 
mother in Seattle. 

SAMPSON.— Mr. ami Mrs. R. W. Sampson of Montreal are the holiday 
ffuests of the latter's parents, Mr and Mrs Parals Ellis, at the fam- 
ily home in Carson City, Nevada. 

SHERMAN.-— Barreda Sherman, the .. n,i Mrs. Harry Sherman. 

and his sisters, Miss Lucia and Miss Isabel Sherman, are spending the 
holidays at the family home In Jackson street. 

IRT. — Lieutenant and Mis, George A Sparry have returned from a 
trip t" Southern home at their quartan 

i 'i sidio. 

ZEILJB. The Misses Ruth Zeiie and Gertrude Hopkins, who visited Mr. 
and Mrs. MOOntford 9. Wilson, retained to town Tuesday afternoon. 

DEPARTURES. 

DAVIS, Mi and Mrs, Francis Davis left last week for Santa Crus to 

remain until after the new year. 
DIE] .MANN". — Mr. and Mrs. John I Mel ma nn. who have spent the last 

four months at i Hotel, havi gone to their former home in 

\ ogeles foi the winter. 
GROSS. — Lieutenant and Mrs. Wank Gross, U S N . lefl last Saturday 

for Washington. D. C. where the former will he assigned to shore 

duty. 

Dr. Clyde Payne and Dr. Eugene Payne, Dentists, have resumed 

practice at 14$ Grant avenue. Telephone Kearny 66. Hours: 9 to 4. 



iiaislip.— i.i, . Karvej HaJsllp, foi mi rt: of the i 

Dakota, lei'i Friday for his a.-w post - r. s. s. Not i 

IRBY.— M».-and Mrs. John Irbj I n up th tartmenl al 

borough Hail, and have returned to their hoi i Denvei 

SPRECKELS. Clau i lugu tus Spreckela sail* d reci mi, ,.,, Euro 
c panled bj Ills niece, Miss l -rrie \\ ooster. 

INTIMATIONS. 

BISHOP.— Mrs. Ella m. Bishop, formerly of Burlingame, but who 
the last few years In Brasil, has taken apartments In Berkeley. 

BLACK.— Charles N. Black and Miss Marie Louise Black u in leave soon 

for New York. 
GREENWOOD.— Mr. and Mrs. George D. Greenwood, of Oakland, will 

spend the next year in Europe. 
HAGER.— Miss Alice Hager, of San Francisco, is building an attractive 

residence on Aimer road in Burlingame. 
HARRIS.— Mrs. Edward Harris and Mrs. A. N. Jackson, of Arguollo bou- 
levard, are entertaining as a Yuletide visitor Miss Sophia Brick. 
HEDGES.— Mrs. Walton Hedges is here from Santa Barbara, visiting the 

Henry Clarence Breeden family. 
HELLMAN.— Mr. and Mrs. I. W. Hellman, Jr., are in Berlin, where thej 

will remain until the close of the holiday season. 
HENDRY.— Miss Pearl Hendry, the debutante daughter of Mrs. W. S\ 

Hendry, leaves shortly for Paris, where she will spend the cornitig 

year with her mother. 
LENT.— Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Lent are planning to leave for Europe 

shortly after the first of the year. 
LYMAN.— Mr. and Mrs. George Lyman have decided to remain six 

months longer in Europe, making Berlin their home for the winter. 
MACFARLANE.— A function given recently in Honolulu is of much In- 
terest to local society. It was a dance given by Mr. and Mrs. Walter 

Macfarlane at their home in Pensacola street, at which Mrs. Marion 

Dowsett Worthington was the honored guest. 
McCUTCHEON.— Mr. and Mrs. E. J. McCutcheon, having closed their 

home in Los Altos, are in San Francisco. 
MELLEN.— Miss Margaret Mellen is visiting Major and Mrs. Philip Wales 

at Menlo Park. The Wales were abroad in the fall, and expected to 

spend several months traveling, but changed their plans, deciding to 

spend Christmas in their home. 
PAGE.— Miss Leslie Page is leaving soon for Tennessee to visit Mr. and 

Mrs. Temple Bridgman. 
PAINTER.— Dr. and Mrs. Eugene D. Painter and their little son, Terry. 

of Merced, are guests of Dr. and Mrs. S. P. Terry at their home in San 

Jose avenue. Alameda. 
PROCTOR. — Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hunt Proctor and Mr. and Mrs. Louis 

MacDermot will give a New Year's reception at the residence of Mrs 

Charles F. McDermot in Oakland. 
ROBERTS.— Mrs. Myrtle Glenn Roberts has come to spend the wintei 

here from her home in Seattle. 
VON SCHRADER— Colonel and Mrs. Frederick von Schrader are spending 

the winter In Warrenton, Va., and arc planning to return to this city 

early in March. 
SHAW.— Mrs. Jack Shaw and her baby boy are the guests of the Edward 

McCutchens at their Pacific avenue home. 
SILLIMAN'.— Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Silliman and little daughters, Gladys 

and Evelyn, spent Christmas in Pacific Grove with Mr. Silllman'S 

parents. 
SOULE.— Lieutenant Charles Souie, U. S. N.. and Mrs, Soule, are estab- 
lished at El In i 
THEBATJI/r. — Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Thehault. of San Francisco, have 

taken apartments for the winter at the Biven House. 
VICKERSON.- Mrs f. M. Vlckerson, of Burlingame, was among the 

host' i ntertalned last week for Mrs. Finiay Cook, who Is 

moving to Tucson, At l: 



SCHOOL OF DESIGN 

SAN FRANCISCO INSTITUTE OF ART 

Formerly Mark Hopkins Institute 



PAINTING 
DRAWING 
DECORATIVE 
DESIGNING 




MODELING 
ILLUSTRATING 
TEACHERS' 
COURSE 



DAY. NIGHT and S \Tl RDAY CLASSES School Opens Jsnuary 5th 
Circulars mailed on application to the s. V. Institute of Art. San Francisco 




FOR AFTER THEATRE SPECIALTIES 
(Habarrt Dp Cuxi? 

Highest Class Entertainment in San 
Francisco. 20 Star Entertainers 



French and Italian Dinners. With 
Wine. $1.00. also a la Carte. 

MASON AND EDDY STREETS 

Phones: Sutter 3739 Kear 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 3, 1914. 



ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
Savoy.— Lovers of history, students of literature, photo- 
drama enthusiasts and all classes of society to whom art and 
beauty have an appeal, will take peculiar interest in the an- 
nouncement that George Kleine's latest triumph, the _ Cines 
Photo-Drama of "Antony and Cleopatra," will receive its first 
production anywhere at the Savoy Theatre, Monday afternoon. 
The Cines are the master producers of the world, and state that 
in "Antony and Cleopatra" they have even eclipsed their 
achievements with "Quo Vadis," which created such a sensa- 
tion at the Columbia Theatre during the summer. They have 
taken the story of Antony and Cleopatra from the first moment 
of the Roman's fascination by the Egyptian beauty, through the 
vicissitudes of his career as her consort on the throne to the 
final episodes where Antony dies defending her against his 
Roman compatriots, and Cleopatra kills herself by the sting of 

an asp. .... , 

"Antony and Cleopatra" will be given twice daily at the 

Savoy Theatre at half-past two in the afternoon and eight- 
thirty at night. 



Orpheum. — The Orpheum announces for next 
week another splendid and novel bill with six new 
acts. A sensational and perplexing feature will 
be Horace Goldin, the Royal Illusionist, who will 
present in three series the most stupendous expo- 
sition of magic ever witnessed on any stage. The 
first, entitled "A Revue of Conjuring," from the 
fifteenth to the twentieth century. In the second 
portion of his entertainment Goldin introduces his 
original twentieth century miracles; and for a 
finale he gives his latest and greatest creation, a 
pantomimic spectacular production, "The Tiger 
God," a weird and awe-inspiring story of Eastern 
mystery. 

Maude Muller, and Ed Stanley, who styles him- 
self "The Pride of Piccadilly," will indulge in 
song and story, blended in an attractive way. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Allen will appear in an 
amusing sketch, entitled "She Had to Tell Him." 

The Boudini Brothers, accordeon virtuosi, who 
have given to their instrument the dignity of the 
violin, will render difficult selections. 

Joe Shriner and Doll Richards will sing, chat 
and dance. 

Tryon's Dogs, featuring Hector, will appear. 
* * * 

Gaiety. — The appearance to-night and here- 
after in the Gaiety production, "The Girl at the 
Gate," of Bickel and Watson, as chief fun-makers, 
is being looked forward to with the greatest en- 
thusiasm among local playgoers. The announce- 
ment that these two comedians, generally known 
as the funniest duo in two hemispheres, had been 
secured by the Gaiety, was received with joyous 
approval, and the enterprise of the management 
in inducing them to forego a thirty-two week con- 
tract elsewhere shows that the policy inaugurated 
by the O'Farrell street house, with the "Candy 
Shop," is being just as faithfully adhered to as a 
pleased and delighted public could hope. Bickel 
and Watson will be remembered for the tremen- 
dous hit they registered here in Ziegfeld's "Follies 
of 1910." In many other respects the new Gaiety 
show has been materially and agreeably strength- 
ened since its opening. 



Bert Lytell has appeared in few roles that offer him as wide 
opportunities as the part of Tom Wilson. Evelyn Vaughan will 
play the role of the heroine, Jane Belknap. All the other Al- 
cazar favorites will be seen in parts of various types and char- 
acter, and Fred J. Butler, the painstaking stage director of the 
Alcazar, will offer a duplicate production of the original which 
he saw in New York last year. 



Symphony Concerts. — By far the most pretentious programs 
ever given by a symphony orchestra in San Francisco will be 
those of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra for the second 
half of its 1913-1914 season. Friday afternoon, January 9th, 
will find the first symphony concert of the New Year ushered 
in with a program that bids fair to prove one of "greatness." 

Assisting the orchestra in the capacity of soloist will be 
Kathleen Parlow, a violinist in whom San Francisco takes par- 
ticular pride. Miss Parlow will play the Saint-Saens Concerto 
in B minor for violin and orchestra, and a group consisting of 
Tschaikowsky; Serenade, "Melancholique," and Wienawski 
Carneval, "Russe." 

Caesar Franck's joyous symphony in D minor, the perform- 




Alcazar. — One of the most successful plays of 
modem times will be offered at the Alcazar Thea- 
tre by Evelyn Vaughan. Bert Lytell and the Alcazar players on 
next Monday night, following their highly successful production 
of "The Man Who Owns Broadway." This worthy successor 
to the musical comedy will be none other than Edgar Selwyn's 
widely discussed play, "The Country Boy," which will be of- 
fered for the first time in stock and at popular prices. Direct 
from a run of a solid year at the Liberty Theatre, New York, 
and a remarkably successful season on the road, comes this 
dramatic plum to the Alcazar 



Mrs. Frederick Allen, who null appear next week at the Orpheum. 



ance of which gave such pleasure to those who attended the first 
concert, will be repeated by request. 

Henry Hadley's Rhapsody, "The Culprit Fay," will be given 
at this concert for the first time in San Francisco. The work 
found representation on all the great symphony orchestras of 
this country and Europe. 



The shark has to turn over on its back before it can 

seize its prey. The shark is the genuine backbiter. — Ex. 



January 3, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



1? 






Uhnanqal; 



The close of the year showed the 
Security Markets. usual selling pressure by those hold- 

New York and Abroad, ers of securities who required ready 

money to meet the usual business 
settlements at the close of the year. Bears took advantage of 
this movement to throw stock on the market to reap scalper's 
profits. However, this realizing was of limited extent, and the 
leading lines exhibited an encouraging resistance. With the 
currency bill adopted, the situation is greatly clarified, and noth- 
ing of a pessimistic character now clouds the horizon. The in- 
ability of the railroads to finance themselves to needed supplies 
and equipments is probably the next biggest problem to be 
faced; financiers are becoming sanguine that this will be 
brought about by some sort of a compromise on the part of the 
Interstate R. R. Commission. Banks throughout the country 
have generally signified their intention to group themselves in 
the several regional selections, and join in getting the maximum 
benefit out of the new Currency Act. The first regional section 
located will be New York; the commissioners are scheduled 
to meet there January 7th. As usual, call money is hard in New 
York at this season; little attention is paid to the condition, as 
it is acknowledged to be temporary, and due to the closing set- 
tlements of the year. There will likely be some buying of se- 
curities following the usual January disbursements in interest 
and dividends, to be followed later by a slight reaction. The 
outlook is considered very much more promising than at any 
time for a year past. The present administration is regarded as 
doing constructive work, which will ultimately lead to substan- 
tial advantages in commerce and finance. It is reported that 
bills pertaining to rural farm credits will be given the right o: 
way when Congress assembles, an action which should greatly 
stimulate the farming community of the country. London 
showed depression this week on account of money required for 
seasonal settlements; securities were naturally irregular. Cop- 
per showed improvement and recovered to 15. 



Local Market in 
Stocks and Bonds. 



Small lot transactions in some of the 
favorites marked the close of the 
trading of this year, the usual sea- 
sonal showing. More activity will 
be injected into the market following the disbursements of the 
dividends, and interest due with, the opening of the new year. 
Several issues hardened under this expectation, notably U. K. 
R. 4's, Pac. Tel. & Tel., S. P. refunding, and Cal. Gas & Elec. 
unifying. The bond market throughout the country continues 
rather sluggish and is hardly expected to do better till the re- 
adjustment of conditions have reached a more substantial plane. 
Trading in stocks contained no feature, the market continuing 
very narrow, practically unchanged. Associated continues to 
hang steady at 39-39'^, with comparatively very little stock 
moving. The oil situation is generally accepted as gradually 
acquiring a better footing, but thus far this change has not been 
reflected in the general price of oil issues. Standard Oil of 
California is the only one which has made a substantial ad- 
vance. It is now selling at 264, an increase of 130 points in 
approximately one year. The total number of shares traded 
in the local exchange in 1913 up to the middle of this week 
were 101,200; the total of bond values, par, in the same period, 
was $3,029,300. 



General Petroleum 
Exchanging Stock. 



The Mercantile Trust Co., of this 
announces to stock and bond- 
holders of General Petroleum that 
it is now prepared to receive their 
securities and furnish them with interim certificates therefor 
under the offer made by the Western Ocean Syndicate, Ltd. 
This offer requires that the stocks an-i bonds must be deposited 
with the trust company not later than Wednesday, Janu 
1914. By the terms of the agfeenv nt, the stocks and bonds 



deposited with the Mercantile Trust Co. will be returned to their 
owners providing a sufficient number is not turned in to carry 
through the deal which is 51 per cent, or there will be issued to 
the shareholders of General Petroleum stocks and bonds of 
General Petroleum, Ltd., a London corporation, on the follow- 
ing basis: Seven per cent cumulative preference shares of the 
par value of 205 1. sterling will be issued for each $1,000 6 per 
cent bond, and ordinary shares of the par value of 15 1. will be 
issued for each $100 share of General Petroleum stock. It is 
imperative that this plan should go through, and shareholders 
should make the exchange of stocks and bonds offered if they 
desire to see the company refinanced and again placed on a 
substantial commercial footing. Lord Pirrie, chairman of the 
big shipbuilding firm of Burmeister & Wain, of Copenhagen and 
Glasgow; Andrew Weir & Co., an influential shipping concern 
of London; R. Tilden Smith, A. M. Grenfell, a London banker, 
and other men prominent in England's shipping and financial 
circles, are willing to advance the money for refinancing Gen- 
eral Petroleum because they believe the company has a great 
and prosperous future on account of its holdings and prospects 
in the rich California oil fields. It remains for the stock and 
bond holders of General Petroleum to decide whether they will 
exchange their old securities for the new ones, and embark 
with these capitalists in a world-wide thriving enterprise. 



"Why, Freddy, how dirty you are, and only yesterday 

you wrote a verse for papa's birthday, promising always to wash 
your hands clean." "Well, mamma, that was only a poetic 
license." — Ex. 



GENERAL PETROLEUM CO. 



NOTICE TO 

STOCKHOLDERS and BONDHOLDERS 

Mercantile Trust Company of San 
Francisco is now ready to receive 
stock and bonds of General Petroleum 
Company and to issue Interim Cer- 
tificates therefor under offer made by 
Western Ocean Syndicate, Limited. 
The offer made requires that the 
stock and bonds be deposited not 
-later than Wednesday, January 7, 
1914. 



MERCANTILE TROST COMPANY 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 
Eatabllsbad ■•<! 

SUTRO &, CO. 

410 Montgomery Street 

Detailed Information in Retard to Any Security 

Will be Furniehed Upon Requeet 

Members— The San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 3, 1914. 



OUR MINERAL OUTPUT. 

At the close of the year 1913 the mineral industry in Cali- 
fornia continues to display a healthy condition, and shows 
every evidence of continuing the remarkable rate of growth 
which it has maintained during the past several years. While 
the exact production figures for the year just ending, which are 
obtained by totaling the returns from individual producers, will 
not be available for another six months, it is possible to arrive 
at a close approximation of the value of the State's mineral 
output at this time. 

Petroleum, which has strengthened its hold on first place, 
will show a production of about 93,000,000 barrels, an increase 
of 3,500,000 barrels over the 1912 output. The most gratifying 
feature of the situation being the increase in consumption at 
a rate sufficient to not only maintain the prices of the previous 
year, but to show a slight increase over the average price of 
46.7 which held during 1912. Thus petroleum alone, the crude 
product of the wells, will show a value of about $43,500,000, 
or an increase of $1,500,000 as compared to 1912. 

Gold, which was the most important mineral product of the 
State for so many years, comes second with a value differing 
but little from the 1912 figures, in round numbers $20,000,000. 
Increased efficiency in dredge manufacture and operation con- 
tinues to keep the output of this method of gold mining up to 
the mark, in spite of the fact that the class of material being 
worked is constantly becoming poorer. Deep mining is in a 
more prosperous condition than it was a year ago, and there 
has been no important change in any branch of precious metal 
mining. 

The copper outlook, as far as actual results go, has remained 
practically unchanged during the present year. The fume ques- 
tion has not yet been settled, but an attitude of hopefulness 
prevails, and much further experimenting and scientific in- 
vestigation has taken place, all of which augurs well for an 
early return to the greater exploitation of the unmeasured cop- 
per resources of the State. Production for 1913 will be valued 
at approximately $5,500,000. 

Cement output will show an increase of about $2,000,000 in 
value, or a total of close to $8,000,000. Crushed rock and gran- 
ite will exceed $6,000,000; brick, $3,000,000; natural gas, 
$1,250,000; borax, a normal production worth over $1,000,000; 
silver, $800,000; and quicksilver, $750,000, a decrease due 
largely to the low price of $38.50 per flask, which prevailed 
during the year. 

The minor mineral products exhibited normal activity and 
growth, and a conservative estimate of the total output for 1913 
shows the gratifying increase of approximately $4,000,000 
over the 1912 figures of $91,472,385. 



CITIES WITHOUT LIGHT. 

The urban transportation systems of some of the large cities 
of the United Kingdom have been recently completely tied up 
by obstinate strikes. In Dublin, for instance, the business of 
the town was paralyzed for weeks by a prolonged strike, and 
as to conditions in Leeds, the London Express prints this des- 
patch from that city : 

"In face of a general failure of the gas supply to-night and 
an almost certain stoppage of electric tramcars to-morrow, the 
position brought about by the strike of municipal workers in 
Leeds is extremely grave. 

"It had been hoped to continue the production of gas in 
sufficient quantities to serve for some time, but, following the 
closing down of the principal gasworks yesterday, another has 
had to be closed to-day, and now all the work of production de- 
volves on the only remaining works, where a few men, aided by 
clerks in overalls and gloves, are still at work. 

"The supply of electricity has also been seriously curtailed 
by the stoppage of work by skilled men, who have ignored the 
seven days' notice required of them on the ground that the 
duties of the strikers were being carried out by officials. 

"This resulted to-day in the withdrawal of sixty tramcars and 
the enforced idleness of 200 tramwaymen. A ballot of these 
has been taken, and there can be no doubt about the result; 
every one in the city is already resigned to the prospect of go- 
ing to business on foot. 

"The engineers in charge at the generating stations are san- 
guine that they will be able to keep up a sufficient output for 
lighting purposes. The men who remain at work are living and 



sleeping on the premises. Thirty or forty beds have been 
brought in, and there is enough food for a considerable time. 
The supply of coal will last several weeks, and there seems to 
be little fear that the electric light will fail. That is the only 
gleam of hope at present." 

It is needless to enlarge on the dangers of a great city bereft 
of street lights. The problem is so important and so threaten- 
ing that the British government has instituted a military school 
in which the soldiers are taught the trade of electricians, so as 
to be in readiness to take care of lighting systems of towns 
where they may be needed. 



SUCCESSOR TO SNELL'S SEMINARY. 

Miss Adelaide Smith, who has been principal and manager of 
Snell's Seminary, will open her new seminary for young ladies 
on January 12th in Berkeley. Snell's Seminary, which was 
known all over the coast as one of the leading educational in- 
stitutions of the bay cities, went out of existence on Decem- 
ber 31st, and will be succeeded by Miss Smith's seat of learn- 
ing. Miss Smith has engaged for her school a capable and emi- 
nent corps of teachers, including many of distinction formerly 
making part of the Snell Seminary staff. Among others, W. C. 
Morrow, the well known writer of fiction, will continue with Miss 
Smith, and will have charge of the English literature class. 

The neighborhood of the University of California, making 
available so many important and valuable lecture courses, 
and other educational facilities, makes the location of Miss 
Smith's seminary ideal. The seminary curriculum will in- 
clude university preparatory courses, vocal and instrumental 
music, domestic arts, manual training and gymnastics. 

Miss Smith's new seminary will be located at 2237 Piedmont 
avenue, Berkeley. 



Newspaper Clerk — Your advertisement reads, "Wanted : 

a little girl to mind a baby." Don't you think it would sound 
better if it read like this : "Wanted : a girl to care for a baby?" 
Advertiser — No; "mind" is the correct word. You don't know 
that baby. — Judge. 



STOCK RANCH 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. 1,500 acres 
12 miles from San Jose, two miles from a station, on the 
Southern Pacific Railroad. About 300 acres tillable land, 
200 acres of which is mostly level, and has been sown to 
wheat, producing enormous crops. The balance is rolling 
hills, with a small piece of rough land covered with natu- 
ral grasses, affording abundance of feed during the sum- 
mer months. A creek runs through the property, and 
numerous springs give plenty of water for cattle. 
Improvements are old, but with small expenditure could 
be put in first-class condition. The place has been used 
as a stock ranch, and turned off 250 head of horses and 
beef cattle a year, and if properly equipped, would make 
a good dairy or hog ranch, being close to the railroad and 
markets. About 200 acres would be suitable for orchard. 
Price $27.50 per acre, one-half cash, balance easy terms. 

Address HEDLEY HALL, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco. 



January 3, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



In view of prevailing confusion 
The Prophets of counsel and prophecy concern- 

Confounded Themselves, cerning what the new currency 

law will do to us, the News Letter 
has hesitated to intrude on the contending financial doctors. 
When Senator Root, from his place on the floor, expounded with 
so much ability and learning the danger of inflation which he 
deemed must follow the passage of the bill, it was confusing to 
the plain citizen to find in the Financial Chronicle of the same 
date this editorial declaration: 

"To us it has seemed from the first that the two great 
danger points were the possibility of a sudden large con- 
traction in national bank circulation with the inauguration 
of the new system and a great depreciation in the value of 
government bonds . . . Under the changes now made, 
these dangers no longer loom so large." 

Now, the Financial Chronicle is the leading authority in 
America on banking and currency affairs. Like Senator Root, 
the Chronicle took a stand against the bill, but explained that 
stand by offering a reason exactly contradictory of that ad- 
vanced by Senator Root. In fine, the critics appear to destroy 
each other and the prophets confound themselves. 



REAL ESTATE BARGAINS. 



WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION. 
State Casualty Law in Effect With the New Year. 

With the beginning of the new year, the most far reaching 
and inclusive statute providing for workmen's compensation in 
case of accident or casualty goes into effect. The immediate 
consequence of this law now in force is that every employer of 
labor must take out some reliable form of casualty insurance. 
This insurance is simply a measure of self-protection of ob- 
vious necessity. Of course, the sum of the insurance premiums 
will necessarily be added to the cost of production, and must 
of course become a permanent tax on the industry of the com- 
monwealth. 

Employers can insure either with the State insurance depart- 
ment created by the act, or with some one of the well established 
casualty companies, of which there is a wide selection open for 
choice. Naturally, by reason of the new law covering the 
whole State, there will be in the beginning a tremendous rush 
to get insured, and employers will be well advised to get their 
applications for policies in hand at the earliest possible mo- 
ment. It may be presumed that the rates set by all companies 
engaged in this business will be graded to meet the prices 
charged for insurance by the State. 



W. W. MONTAGUE & CO. 

557-563 MARKET STREET 

Are showing a fine assortment of 

STOVES HEATERS 

ANDIRONS 
FIRE SETS SCREENS 

and an endless variety of 
useful household utensils. 



FINEST DAIRY FARM IN CALI- 
FORNIA, NINETY MILES 
FROM SAN FRANCISCO 



ACREAGE 

750 acres (survey shows 787.5 acres), all deep river bot- 
tom sediment soil, less than two miles from a first-class 
shipping point on the Southern Pacific Railroad, within 90 
miles of San Francisco, and 9 miles south of Stockton. 
350 acres are in alfalfa, yielding six cuttings, balance in 
barley and pasture. 

IRRIGATION 

A pumping plant has been installed, equipped with a 

10-inch centrifugal pump, 18 inch steel intake pipe, taking 

water from the San Joaquin River, 40 horsepower electric 

motor, capacity 3,500 gallons per minute. 

A large canal runs through the property, and smaller 

ditches are being completed for irrigation. 

When the balance of the land is prepared, it will be 

seeded to alfalfa. The place will then carry 600 heud of 

milch cows, young stock and hogs. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

Fine modern electric lighted dwelling. 
Spacious farm-house. 

New ice plant for cooling milk and refrigeration. 
Cow barn, accommodating 400 head of cows at one milk- 
ing, with storage capacity for 800 tons of hay. 
Two new silos, concrete foundations, of 1,500 tons 
capacity. 

Several small barns. 
Blacksmith shop and outhouses. 

Tank house and tank, 42,000 gallons, operated by elec- 
tricity. 

Large weighing scales. 
All necessary implements. 

STOCK 

350 head of fine young milch cows. 
25 head of work-horses. 
5 thoroughbred bulls. 

500 tons of alfalfa and barley hay in the stack. 
At the present time, 750 gallons of milk are being shipped 
daily, with a milking of 250 head. We are in a position 
to contract for all the milk produced at 15 cents per gal- 
lon, F. O. B. railroad station. 

REMARKS 

The place, with only one-half of the acreage under culti- 
vation, is paying over 12 per cent net, and when fully de- 
veloped, at a small expense, will more than double the 
present net income. This is the best acreage investment 
in California, having many natural advantages, cheap 
shipping rate to Stockton and San Francisco, free water 
for irrigation from the San Joaquin River, cheap electric 
light and power, most productive soil, and ideal climatic 
conditions. 

TERMS 

Price, $200,000. $60,000 cash, balance in four equal an- 
nual installments, with interest at 6 per cent. The profits 
of the ranch should take care of the defened payments 
and development. 



address, HEDLEY HALL, 

21 SUTTER ST., S. 



F. 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 3, 1914. 




JINSVEMCEi 




Rod E. Smith, special agent for the London Assurance, cover- 
ing the Pacific Northwest, will resign on March 1st. 

Manager A. W. Thornton has recovered from his recent se- 
vere illness, and is again at his desk. 

* * * 

It is quite probable that all surety companies will begin the 
New Year as members of the Surety Underwriters' Association 
of California. A flat commission rate of fifteen per cent has 

been agreed upon for San Francisco and the bay counties. 

* * * 

Special Agent W. H. Raymond, of the Liverpool & London & 
Globe, has been elected president of the Special Agents' Asso- 
ciation of the Pacific Northwest, composed of field men oper- 
ating in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and British Co- 
lumbia. 

* * * 

The main contract for construction of two wings in the 
building of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company at the 
northwest corner of Pine and Stockton streets, has been 
awarded. The contract calls for the expenditure of $137,300, 
which sum will be increased by additional contracts. The new 
wings will each have a frontage of 22x94, and will make the 
already elegant structure one of the handsomest from an ar- 
tistic standpoint in San Francisco. The rapid growth of the 
Metropolitan has made this addition necessary for the accom- 
modation of the Pacific Coast branch. 

* * * 

The new rate book has gone into effect at Bakersfield, Cal., 
showing a five per cent reduction on the basis rate of dwelling 
houses. The reductions on business property vary from 7 to 30 
per cent. All these reductions are effective on insurance writ- 
ten since October 10th. The former basis rate on frame resi- 
dences was 50 cents, but is now reduced to 45 cents. 

* :;: * 

In sustaining the demurrer of the State in the case of the 
Standard Fire of Connecticut against Insurance Commissioner 
Fishback, of Washington, Judge Michel upholds the Fishback 
ruling that fire insurance companies seeking to do business in 
Washington subsequent to 1911 must make the same deposits 
as are required of domestic fire insurance companies. 

The Industrial Accident Board has sent to the Supervisors 
the opinion of its attorney to the effect that the liability of the 
city of San Francisco under its charter for injuries to and death 
of policemen and firemen is not augmented or changed by the 
workmen's compensation and insurance act, and that the police- 
men and firemen cannot claim additional benefits under this 
act. There is no obligation on the city to apply for State in- 
surance under this act, and the State is authorized to insure only 

for compensation to be paid under the act. 
* * * 

The city of Portland, Ore., is to discontinue January 1st all 
insurance policies on city belongings and reinsure under one 
blanket policy covering all the buildings, bridges and other 
property. No insurance will be placed on fire stations and some 
of the other small structures. That mutual as well as regular 
fire insurance companies shall share in the insurance being 
placed on city property was the decision reached by the council. 
All companies, however, in which insurance is taken out must 
have a paid-up capital stock and surplus of at least $350,000. 
Insurance will be equally distributed among all agencies which 

desire to handle it under the blanket policy form. 

* * * 

Articles of incorporation of the Guardian Fire Insurance Co., 
organized by business men of Salt Lake City, and other cities 
of Utah and Idaho, have been filed with the clerk of Salt Lake 
County. The company has a capital stock of $500,000, with 
shares at $10 each. The officers of the company are : President, 
David C. Eccles; vice-president, C. E. Loose; second vice-presi- 
dent, Thomas Smart; treasurer, L. B. McCornick; secretary, E. 
D. Petrie. 



Col. Charles Mason Kinne, who died suddenly on Christmas 
day at the home of his daughter, at Berkeley, Cal., surrounded 
by his wife and children, was a veteran of the Civil War, and 
for more than thirty years had been prominently identified with 
fire underwriting on the Pacific Coast. He was a member of the 
famous California Hundred, which joined the Second Massa- 
chusetts Cavalry, and served as Adjutant-General throughout 
the war. Col. Kinne has been with the San Francisco office of 
the Liverpool & London & Globe since 1871, and since 1889 
had been assistant resident secretary of the Pacific Department 
under Charles D. Haven, resident secretary. In December, 
1911, both gentlemen were retired on handsome pensions. Col. 
Kinne was author of the famous Kinne Rule, which is still in 
use. He was 72 years old, and a native of De Witt Center, 

New York. 

* * * 

W. H. H. Cooper, of Seattle, has been arrested under a crimi- 
nal complaint charging him with placing insurance in a non- 
admitted company. Under the law of Washington an agent 
who places insurance in an unlicensed company is liable to im- 
prisonment and fine. This is the first arrest made under the 

new law. 

* * * 

The compulsory deposit law of Washington, passed in 1911, 
requiring foreign and other States fire insurance companies en- 
tering that State to make a special deposit of $200,000 in Wash- 
ington or some other State, has been sustained by the Supreme 
Court of Washington. The decision is on a test case begun by 
the Standard Fire of Connecticut. 



1863 



1913 



FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 

Capital $1,500,000 Assets, $10,000,000 

FIRE MARINE AUTOMOBILE 

California and Saniome Streets, San Francisco, California. 

The West Coast Life Ins. Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

A strong, well-managed Institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
aws of California. Its policy forma are clear and explicit, and define and 
tjuard th« Interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or writ© the company for sample of policy forms. 

The Connecticut Fire Ins. Co. 

OF HARTFORD. ESTABLISHED 1860. 
SIXTY-THIRD ANNUAL STATEMENT. 

Capital »1. 000,000 

Total Assets 7,736,110 

Surplus to Policyholders 3,266.021 

Pacific Department: 

The Insurance Exchange San Francisco, Cal. 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager, 
'.t'u. E. Billing* Roy C. Ward Geo. B. Dinsmore J. C. Meassdorffer Jamet W. Dean 

GEO. E. BILLINGS CO. 

INSURANCE BROKERS AND AVERAGE ADJUSTERS 
312 California St., San Francisco, Cal. Phone Douglas 2283 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 

(Best In the West) 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevator, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels. Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass. Accident and Health 
Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

T. L. Miller. President; L. B. Hoge, General Manager Accident and 
Health Department. 

Head Office— Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. 



January 3, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



The Hudson Bay Fire Insurance Company, which has been 
operated in the Pacific field as a non-boarder, has made appli- 
cation to join the Board of Fire Underwriters of the Pacific. 

* * * 

The Pacific Board has reconsidered its determination to 
change its headquarters from the Merchants' Exchange Build- 
ing to the Insurance Exchange Building. 

* * * 

At the annual banquet of the Seattle Surety Association, 
nearly every surety agency in the city was represented. Geo. 
W. Allen, president of the Association, and district manager of 
the National Surety, was toastmaster. 

* * * 

The Denver Association of Casualty and Surety Agents gave 
a banquet last week at the Shirley Hotel, complimentary to 
Thos. F. Daly and Insurance Commissioner Epsteen, in recog- 
nition of their work in connection with the Chicago Conference, 
which resulted in the modification of Superintendent Emmet's 
order reducing the commissions of agents. 

At a meeting of the executive committee of the National 
Board, Vice-President Whitney Palache, of the Hartford Fire, 
was selected as the board's official representative in the Na- 
tional Council of the World's Insurance Congress, to be held at 
San Francisco in 1915. A preliminary meeting of the Council 
is to be held in the spring of next year. 



DEL MONTE NOTES. 



Xmas at Del Monte is truly a happy event, and not at all like 
the usual Xmas spent in a hotel. A large Xmas tree was placed 
on the landing in front of the dining room, which was beauti- 
fully decorated with tinsel balls and colored lights. After din- 
ner, Xmas night, when all the guests had assembled in the 
lobby, the lights were turned out, with the exception of tne 
colored ones on the tree. Just at this moment, hundreds of 
sparklers, which had been placed on the tree were lighted. 
It looked like a ball of fire — a most beautiful effect. Later on, 
huge baskets of presents were passed along among the guests, 
each taking one. Then the fun began : lizzards, horses, car- 
riages, tops, and all sorts of things were running around the floor 
— horns were blown, drums beat, and all in all it was a very 
jolly affair. Many of the guests and their friends repaired to 
the ball room, where they indulged in dancing for the rest of 
the evening. 

After spending a most delightful two weeks at Del Monte, 
every minute of which they thoroughly enjoyed, Madam and 
Herr Kubelik, and their party, left for San Francisco on Friday. 
They were all good sportsmen, and aside from taking long 
walks and motoring, they went on several hunting and fishing 
expeditions. 

Prof. R. E. Allardice, of Stanford University, who is a fre- 
quent visitor to Del Monte, arrived last week for the holidays. 
He is an ardent golfer, and took part in the New Year's golf 
tournament. 



CONVENTION LEAGUE BULLETIN. 

The Christmas bulletin of the Convention League shows the 
work of that organization for 1915. As guaranteed attendance 
at the Exposition, over one hundred and fifty conventions have 
been secured, and it has cost the Convention League something 
like ten thousand dollars, which is but a moderate expenditure 
for the great amount of work done. The League points out that 
the difficulty in getting conventions for 1915 is that a great 
many organizations reflect that their convention will not receive 
sufficient attention in an exposition city, and for that reason 
they prefer meeting in some other coast or inland city and mak- 
ing a day or two stop over in San Francisco en route. During 
the year coming, the League expects to list another 150 con- 
ventions to come here as well as many for 1914 and 1915. 



LLOYDS CRAWFISHING. 
Underwriters Seek to Shift Losses in the Baker Defalcation. 

The News Letter printed last week some instructive facts go- 
ing to prove that the fabled "commercial honor" of Lloyds un- 
derwriters is not all that it has been cracked up to be. In that 
instance, Lloyds was shown to have pleaded the statute of 
limitations to evade payment of a marine loss sustained by the 
Progresso Steamship Company of San Francisco. 

That was a case where payment was avoided with the help 
of a purely technical excuse. This week one learns of another 
form of crawfishing attempted by members of Lloyds. The 
Crocker Bank of this city was insured with Lloyds against loss 
by defalcation, and when Charles F. Baker, the assistant cash- 
ier of the bank defaulted for $200,000, Lloyds had to make good 
$160,000 of the loss. 

But Lloyds does not mean to stand the loss if it can by any 
means be shifted to other shoulders, and accordingly the un- 
derwriters have brought suit against E. H. Hutton & Co., J. C. 
Wilson & Co. and Byrne & McDonnell, the brokers through 
whom Baker dealt in stocks. Lloyds seek to recover in the ag- 
gregate $160,000 from these brokers on the alleged ground that 
Baker wrongfully credited these firms with certain sums of 
money on the books of the bank. Another ground is alleged to 
obtain recovery of damages for the conversion of bonds which 
Baker is declared to have pledged with the brokers to cover his 
margins. It is alleged that the defendants received these bonds 
without giving any legal or valid consideration. 

The suits are brought in the name of the Crocker Bank, but 
the real plaintiff in interest is Lloyds, or rather the members 
of Lloyds, who now desire to shift their loss on other shoulders. 
Lloyds, in fact, is not an insurance company, but is an associa- 
tion of individuals who bet as individuals, and not as a corpora- 
tion on a great variety of risks. The society of Lloyds is not 
liable for the losses incurred by its individual members, nor can 
it govern the policy or course of action that seems most profit- 
able to the several underwriters. A chain is no stronger than 
its weakest link, and if the reputed standard of commercial 
honor attributed to Lloyds are violated, there does not appear 
to be any recourse. 



"While I acknowledge," said the fat man of the dime mu- 
seum, "that the policy of expansion has made me what I am, 
still it's awfully expensive." And he reluctantly paid out three 
weeks' salary for a new suit of clothes. — Ex. 



k 4/7\a a 


Sell and knit to order 


f rWfi/tfeii 


the Pf liter Quality Under- 


W tt v 1 lAwfJ 


wear, Bathing Suits. 


V»w»>^ W W w • • •^ 


Athletic Suits, Sweaters, 


knitJtingco. 


Jerseys, Shaker and 


114 SANSOME ST. 


Jumbo knit Coa t 
Sweaters and Ruff Neck 


Cor. Bush 


Coats. 


ROOM 31 


Come and See 



Mamma — Dorothy, do you know who ate my raisins ? 

Dorothy (turning over the leaves of her book more rapidly) — 
Mamma, you told me yesterday some things are better left un- 
said. Isn't that one of them ? — Ex. 



NORTH GERMAN LLOYD 

LONDON -PARIS -BREMEN 

Januaj Ington January 31 

January 1? Ki , ' „, 

20 'Bremen 
January -T »Br ' Cahli II . 

: 

THE MEDITERRANEAN 

Ian. •; Berlin. Jan rough ral 

SOUTH AMERICA gidla an. I the 

Far I 

AROUND THE WORLD. $652.30 

Three irlnl . the 

WEST INDIES & PANAMA CANAL 

JANUARY 14 FEBRUARY 12 MARCH 19 

Rate $160 uD-21 to 29 Days 

tor our 

Travelers' Checks Good All Over the World 

. ■ 



San Fran 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 3, 1914. 




The California State Automobile Association Growli g Rapidly 

So rapidly is the membership of the California State Auto- 
mobile Association increasing, and so numerous are the inqui- 
ries for data from the touring bureau, and such interest is mani- 
fested in other important matters, that the officers of _ the asso- 
ciation have considered the advisability of locating in a more 
convenient place for its members, and have finally decided to 
move to 687 Market street, where they will be permanently 
located on and after January 1, 1914. This will have the effect 
of bringing the Association's offices in the same ground floor 
location with that of the information bureau of the Peck-Judah 
Company, thereby providing at once not only complete auto- 
mobile information and dates, but as well general information 
in all lines of interest to the tourist and general motoring public. 

Provisions have also been made for the tourists to make this 
their headquarters, writing table, 'phone and books of travel are 
at the disposal of the members and their guests. These quarters 
have long been considered and will supply a long felt want to 
the automobilists. 

Inasmuch as the various roads, in the State, are- under con- 
struction, the Association is preparing a trip card which will be 
sent to its members, requesting them to fill out and send it to 
the office, giving the conditions of the roads which they have 
traveled, and by this means the association will have the latest 
and most up-to-date information concerning the highways in the 
State. 

During the past week, great activity has been reported in 
increasing membership to the association from the newly 
formed clubs in San Luis Obispo, Sonoma and Santa Cruz 
Counties, which is very gratifying to the officers of the associa- 
tion. They have waged a very vigorous campaign in the in- 
terest of increasing membership, and the results referred to 
seem to justify the activity shown. 

* * * 

Wants Motorized Department 

Montreal's fire chief is disgusted at the antiquated fire 
equipment with which he has to fight the city's conflagrations, 
and he has embarked on a "whirlwind campaign" of his own. 
He wants every fire station in the central part of the city "mo- 
torized" as quickly as possible, saying that the "no money" 
excuse made by the board of estimates is not valid because the 
new apparatus would save the city $10,000 a year, besides giv- 
ing a far more effective service. Montreal is hilly, and horses 
drawing fire engines have a hard time getting the engines to 
the top of some of the hilly streets. 

* * * 

Motor Freight Line 

T. E. Darlington, the Los Angeles member of the California 
Highway Commission, in speaking of the benefits to be de- 
rived from the completion of the $18,000,000 road, says: "From 
my own eyes I know that several automobile trucking com- 
panies are planning to establish motor vehicle trains between 
Los Angeles and Fresno when the State Highway is built. 

"The automobile truck can successfully compete with steam 
and electric roads in hauling freight; this has been proven in 
Europe. The automobile is the coming economic freight trans- 
portation marvel of the next few years. 

"If the two main trunk lines of California's highway system 
are routed as direct as possible from one end of the State to the 
other, and the counties spend their money as they should for 
laterals to tap these main arteries, the State will have in a short 
time the most perfect system of roads in the world. The saving 
to farmers in transporting their products to distribution centers, 



by automobile over a system of direct highway and the similar 
saving to merchants in delivering their product, cannot be ap- 
preciated now in the early development of this means of inter- 
county and even inter-State transportation. 



Must Fix Roads 

The Imperial Valley supervisors are up in arms over the road 
flooding by people doing irrigation. The following is from the 
Imperial Press, and shows the stand that the supervisors in that 
section are taking: 

"The board of supervisors is up in arms against the epidemic 
of infringements of the ordinance protecting the county roads 
from flooding by waste irrigation water from the valley 
ranches. 

"After much heated discussion, a resolution was adopted pro- 
viding that all fines collected from road flooding offenses shall 
be turned over to the road district in which the offense is com- 
mitted, to help that district in repairing the damaged road. The 
measure will prove a great incentive to officers in the various 
districts, including the supervisors and their road masters, to 
see that all offenses are rigidly prosecuted. 

"Another matter proposed by Supervisor Beal is that ranchers 
owning land on both sides, of a country road should maintain 
a gravel roadway across the county road, to protect the latter 
from being cut up by the transferring of stock from one field 
to another after the county road has been wet on one side to 
lay the dust. No action has been taken on this matter up to 
press time, although the supervisors in a body are in favor of 
the measure." 

• * * 

Fresno's Live Motor Club 

Fresno has a live motor organization known as the Fresno 
County Motor Club; the club at the present time is making ar- 
rangements with the telephone company of that place whereby 
the members will have use of telephone lines along the road. 
That is to make possible for owners who have portable tele- 
phones and their motor cars to attach to the company's lines in 
case of trouble, to summon aid from the nearest garage. This 
system of first aid to the motorist is now in use in other parts 
of California, and will prove a great convenience to the motor- 
ists of the raisin section. Members of the club will carry port- 
able telephones in their machine, and when they encounter 
trouble, all that is necessary is to walk to the nearest line, con- 
nect the telephone to the wire and call up the nearest telephone 
office. They will be required to give the number of their club 
card to the telephone office, and this will serve as a guarantee 
for the charges. The telephone operator will then connect them 
with the nearest garage. The telephone company will charge 
the toll to the motor club against the card number, and the 
club will make the charge to the individual member. This is 
but one of the many conveniences which the club will plan for 
its members. 

• • • 

Has Always New Auto 

One Fresno man has adopted a novel way of keeping himself 
in automobiles. He makes real estate keep him in new machines 
every year. The method adopted is this: In the fall, when he 
has got a summer's use out of the automobiles, and is ready 
for a new one, he trades the machine in for a block of real 
estate. He keeps the real estate through the winter months, 
and must do without an automobile for a while. When spring 
calls him for long automobile rides to the rivers and moun- 
tains, he sells his real estate and invariably the advance in 
prices pays for the difference in cost between the old machine 
and a new car. 

• • • 

Good Road Graft 

In a recent investigation in New York it was shown that there 
was considerable graft in the building of the good roads of that 
State. There is as high as a $5,000 contribution fund required 
from some of the political parties for their campaign funds in 
return for securing contracts for highway work. As much as 
one cent a gallon for all asphalt companies who sold to the 
State or contracted. The said companies were to charge their 
contributions to the commission. New companies that did not 
contribute, and hence lost their work, started the investigation. 



January 3, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



Cheap Taxlcab 

London is not proud. The latest solution of the taxicab ques- 
tion has been brought about by the use of the motorcycle and 
side-car. This side-car has the top and curtains so that it pro- 
tects the people riding in it from storms, and at the same time is 
light enough to be propelled by the motorcycle. These motor- 
cycle taxicabs have cut the taxicab fares of London in half. 

* * * 

School for Chauffeurs 

The State of Missouri has started a school for chauffeurs. The 
trustees of the Lincoln Institute, a State school for negroes at 
Jefferson City, has purchased an automobile in St. Louis and 
the machine will be used to train the students in driving and re- 
pair work. 

* * * 

Is An Auto a Horse? 

Is an automobile a horse, and if one is supposed to use a 
horse, may one utilize an automobile? That is the problem 
that is puzzling St. Petersburg, Fla., officials. Sheriff White- 
hurst has an allowance of $1 a day for horse hire, and recently 
put in a bill for $600, the statutory maximum. Some one re- 
membered that the sheriff was never seen driving a horse, but 
was always in an automobile. The sheriff said that the 
machine cost more than a horse, but that he used it for official 
business and pleasure as well, and so did not see what was 
wrong about his claim for the $600. As the law states that the 
$1 a day is for "horse hire," however, some purists are won- 
dering whether they dare call an automobile a horse, or vice 

versa. 

* * * 

Auto Dealers to Meet 

A convention of the automobile dealers of California is to be 
held in Fresno on January 8th, 9th and 10th. It is expected that 
at least a hundred delegates will attend to represent practically 
every dealer in California. The meeting has been called for the 
purpose, of forming a State association of automobile dealers. 
The principal objects of such an organization are the furthering 
of automobile interests, the State unity, and securing of favor- 
able legislation in matters pertaining to the automobile industry, 
close social as well as business relations among the dealers. 

* * * 

The Motor Car Is Now Found Everywhere 

"There are still people in the United States, in fact through- 
out the world, who are waiting for the perfection of the motor 
car before buying," says J. I. McMullen, the general manager 
of the Jeffery Auto Sales Company, Coast distributors for the 
Jeffery car. 

"There are others who fight the advance or the interests of 
motor car owners, claiming that it is catering to a class that 
it is not what may be called the universal users of the highway. 
Yet if strict account were kept of the number of horse-drawn 
vehicles that use the highways — that is, mileage covered — it 
would be found that the owners of motor cars to-day, not only 
for pleasure purposes, but strictly from a commercial stand- 
point, are far in the majority than those of horse-drawn vehicles. 

"The motor car is not to-day limited to the thickly settled 
sections of the world. Or, as some people would claim, to the 
thickly settled sections of the English-speaking world, taking, 
of course, the United States as a standard. The motor car is 
being bought and used in the four corners of the world. It is 
supplanting the horse, and oxen even, in the far East, and is 
to-day the cause of much road improvement in countries unde- 
veloped, and in countries whose history dates back beyond the 
Christian era. 

"This is most forcibly seen in the closing of an agency with 
H. A. Flavell, a motor car dealer in Cape Town, South Africa. 
This agency will compete against those handling English and 
foreign-made cars which up to the present time have enjoyed 

what trade there was in that section of the world." 

* * * 

Thermoid Brake Linings 

It is announced by R. F. Oakes, president of the American 
Ever-Ready Company, that his corporation will act as Pacific 
Coast distributers for the product of the Thermoid Rubber Com- 
pany, of Trenton, N. J., where they manufacture the well known 
Thermoid brake lining. Mr. Oakes is quoted : 

"There are many car owners who do not know how brake lin- 



ing is made, and for them I wish to say that of the many brake 
linings offered, there are few of any particular merit; they are 
loosely woven, stringy and straggling, and when the outside 
is worn off, they have little friction. Without friction, brake 
lining is useless. It might as well be greased and polished 
steel. It is dependable as a knave ; in emergency demanding re- 
liable brakes, it will fail you. Thermoid is the same inside and 
out. It will wear until paper thin. 

"Auto owners know that most brake linings have asbestos as 
a base ; but Thermoid is more than a woven asbestos soaked in 
a coloring compound. It is constructed of pure Canadian asbes- 
tos. This is first interwoven and re-enforced with solid brass 
wire. Under giant heated rolls the interwoven asbestos and 
brass wire is permeated and impregnated with a wondrous fric- 
tion compound. These heavy rolls force this special compound 
clear through every pore of the asbestos body." 
* * * 

Midwinter Race Planned 

The moving spirits in the automobile racing game at Los 
Angeles are making a determined effort to secure support for 
a great speed contest over the Santa Monica course for Feb- 
ruary 22d next. Barney Oldfield has come out in favor of such 
an event, and it is believed that if the race is run, all of the 
best known racing pilots in the East can be induced to come 
West to participate, for there is nothing doing in the racing 
game in the frozen East at that season of the year. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society (The German Bank.) 
(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending December 31, 1913, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, payable 
on and after Friday, January 2, 1914. Dividends not called for are added 
to the deposit account and earn dividends from January 1, 1914. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Manager. 
Office — 526 California street. Mission Branch — Cor. Mission and 21st 
streets. Richmond District Branch — Corner Clement St. and 7th Ave. 
Haight St. Branch — Cor. Haight and Belvedere streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Humboldt Savings Bank 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 

For lh.> hall year ending December 31, 1913. a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of fovir (4) per cent per annum on all savings deposits, payable 

on and after Friday, January 2. 1914. Dividends not called for are added 

to and bear the same rate of interest as the principal from January 1, 1914. 

H. C. KLEVESAHL. Cashier. 
umV" 7S3 Market street, neai Fourth. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Bank of Italy 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 

For the half year ending 1 iecember 81, 1913, a dividend has been declared 

al the rat-- of four (4) per cent per annum on all savings deposits, payable 

on and after Friday, January 2. 1914. Dividends not called for are added 

to and beat the same rate of interest as the principal from January 1, 

lilt Money deposited on or before January 10th will earn interest from 

January 1, 1914. A. PEDRINI, Cashier. 

I„ SCATENA, President. 
Office Southeast corner Montgomery and Clay streets. Market St. 

h. — Junction Market. Turk and Mason streets, 
DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 
I Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending December 31, 1913, a dividend upon all de- 
it the rat.- of four (4) per cent per annum will be payable on and 
after January ". 1B14. 

S. L. ABBOT. Vice-President. 
Offld 818 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

(Memo* i lated savings Banks of San Francisco > 

FOI the half ye. pi 1918, a dividend has been de- 

elan. I at tiie rate of foui i per annum on alt deposits, payable 

en and after Friday. January 2, 1914. dividends not drawn will lie nil. 
to depos pari thereof, and will earn dividend from 

1. 1914. l>ep..sits made on or before January 10. 1914. will draw 
1914. R. M. TOBrN, Secretary. 

McAlllHtei and Jones Btl 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Italian-American Bank. 
(Member "f the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending December 21, 1913, a dividend has been de- 
ol four i4t per cent per annum on all savings deposits 
I alter Friday. January 2, 1914. Dividends not called for will 
1 t>> the principal and bear the same rate of interest from January 
| f.-it Mini J deposited on or before January la. 1914. will cam h 
v I. It'll SI'.ARBORO. Presi.l 

Office— Southeast corner Montgomery and Sacramento streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
French American Bank of Savings. 
Savings Department. 
(Member ol the - gs Banks " r San Fran. 

r year endli - teen de- 

payable 
January ! 
i me rate of Interest as the principal from .tar 
A. LEGALLET, Pre.«ei 
OfhY. street. San Francisco. 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 3, 1914. 



News Gathered Along Automobile Row 



New Tire Construction 

It will be of interest to the motoring public to know that, 
notwithstanding the present advanced state of automobile tire 
consruction, there has recently been developed by one of the 
leading tire manufacturing companies an improved type of con- 
struction that bids fair to revolutionize the automobile tire 
business. 

To the Federal Rubber Manufacturing Company of Milwau- 
kee belongs the credit for this improved tire construction, 
known as Federal "Double-Cable-Base" tires, and which it is 
claimed by the manufacturers positively eliminates such seri- 
ous troubles as sidewall breaks', rim-cuts, tire blowing from 
rim, and pinching of inner tube. As these troubles are among 
the most serious with which motorists have to contend the sig- 
nificance of the Federal "Double-Cable-Base" construction, 
which practically prevents these troubles, will be obvious. It 
is stated that fifty thousand of these improved tires have been 
put into service during the past six months, and thus far not 
a single complaint has been received by the manufacturers. 
These new tires have been made the subject of an interesting 
window exhibit at 361-365 Golden Gate Ave., where are the 
local distributors for Federal tires, and where demonstrations 
and complete information will be given at any time. 



New Chandler Car 

"The Chandler Light Weight Six was first placed on the mar- 
ket in July, 1913, by an organization of men identified for many 
years with the Lozier Company," says S. G. Chapman, local 
distributor. "The car has met with phenomenal success, and 
at the present time two hundred cars per month are being 
shipped from the new steel and concrete factory of the Chand- 
ler Company, in Cleveland, Ohio. It is claimed for this car 
that while the motor is but 3 3 / 8 x5 in. in cylinder dimensions, it 
is of the high speed, long stroke type, which in connection with 
the light weight of the car itself, gives exceptional power on 
hills, and a range of speed on high gear of from 3 to 55 miles 
per hour without shifting gears." 



Tire Man Visits Coast 

Spending all of November and part of December on a trip 
which took him through the Northwest, down the Pacific Coast 
and across the great southwestern section of the country, J. G. 
Robertson, treasurer of the Firestone Tire and Rubber Com- 
pany, was the herald of Firestone expansion in the West. Since 
his swing around the circle, the announcements of the opening 
of two other branches have been made, and the launching of 
others is a certainty. Portland, Ore., and Oakland, Cal., have 
been designated as Firestone branch cities. J. Fleming, for- 
merly with the company in Seattle, will manage the Portland 
branch. 

In the West, the Firestone Company's business outlook never 
has been brighter. The company now is represented in all 
kinds of the larger cities in the coast region, and during the 
next few months there will be established a net work of Fire- 
stone stores extending from British Columbia to Lower Cali- 
fornia, and covering the entire western half of the country. In 
the East, also, new Firestone branches are being opened, and 
the company is reaching out into new fields in every part of the 
country. Provision is being made to take care of the increased 
demand for Firestone goods, which is certain to come in the 
spring. Additions to the tire factory in Akron, O., which will 
permit a 40 per cent increase in output, are almost finished, and 
in a few months will be ready for occupancy. The new factory 
was erected in 1911, and additions have been necessary twice 

since then. 

• * * 

Standardizing the Whole Department 

"Looking towards standardizing the entire department with 
one make of motor car, Fire Commissioner Cole, of Boston, 



has purchased sixteen automobiles without advertising for 
bids. This will make a total of 25 Buicks in the Boston fire 
department service," says R. K. Roberts, general manager of 
the Howard Automobile Company, agents for the Buick. 

"In asking Mayor Fitzgerald for permission to make this big 
purchase at private sale instead of by public bids, Commis- 
sioner Cole said that in his opinion it was altogether probable 
that the lowest bid was not likely to be the best machine for 
the department. Anybody can see the advantage of our having 
only one make of car," says Mr. Cole. "Suppose a driver is 
transferred. He has the same kind of a car to take care of. 
And, besides, it centralizes, simplifies and therefore economizes 
on service. After looking over the entire market, the recom- 
mendation I make was made by the advisory engineer. We 
have been using Buicks in the department for years. One of 
them has gone 100,000 miles. The order includes nine B-36's, 
four 24's, two 37's and a Six." 



All Weather Tread 

Hereafter a popular type of product of The Goodyear Tire 
and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio, is to be known as the "All- 
Weather" tread tire. This name takes the place of "Non Skid" 
as descriptive of the slipless type of Goodyear tire. Only a 
few years ago, non-skid designs for tire treads were considered 
a novelty by motorists. The automobile public next began buy- 
ing non-skids for use in winter and under special weather con- 
ditions, and now there is general recognition of the fact that a 
tire tread, if properly constructed, can insure safety and addi- 
tional miles at all seasons, under a multitude of conditions. 



Big Mileage 

Evidence as to where the old cars go still multiplies. F. 
H. Cunningham, of Hoopeston, 111., writes that he has a 1910 
Kissel-Kar "50" which he has driven 65,874 miles. 

"I have never had any engine trouble, and the car is always 
ready to go day or night," says Mr. Cunningham. "It has cost 
me all told only $48.75 for repairs, and $21.65 of that was paid 
for damage to another car with which I collided. My car was 
not even scratched in the accident." 



Winter Tire Hints 

"We want to suggest the present season as a good one for 
getting your car overhauled and put into good shape again," 
says Manager Miller of the Goodrich Tire Company. "Not only 
are the repair men better able to take care of your needs now, 
than when the spring rush commences, but your car will always 
be ready for those fine days which come to us, even in the 
dreariest winter. Don't 'lay your car up' unless you are posi- 
tively certain you can't get any use out of it this winter. Take 
off your tires if you like, look them over and get any little re- 
pairs made they may need, put them away in a cool, dark cup- 
board with their tubes carefully coiled away in a box, but 
keep them handy. 

"If you have no heat in your garage, be sure to empty your 
radiator, but be equally careful to fill it up again before using 
the car. Carefully oil everything, wipe all bare metal with a 
greasy rag, jack up your wheels to take the weight off the rims, 
but have everything ready so that a very short delay may put 
you on the road any time you wish. 

"Then, equipped with Goodrich Safety Tread tires you will 
find many opportunities for enjoyment between now and spring- 
time. Nothing can be more invigorating than a run on a 
bright, bracing winter day when, well wrapped up, we may with 
impunity defy the most searching temperatures, returning re- 
freshed and invigorated, all the cobwebs blown from our brains 
and with a ravenous appetite which many of our millionaires 
would give half their fortune to possess." 



January 3, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



The New Auto Tex 

It is evident that the State authorities are going to make a 
strong move towards collecting the automobile tax as passed 
by the last Legislature. Undoubtedi y this law will be fought 
not only by the State Automobile Association, but individually 
by some owners and by other organizations in the different parts 
of the State. It means considerable law work, but at the same 
time, while before a decision is rendered, undoubtely the law 
will be enforced, and owners will have to pay the taxes if only 
under protest. 

Many of the owners do not know what amount to send with 
their applications even under protest. It requires that you send 
the catalogue of horsepower, but it has been stated that the 
authorities would use the table to figure horsepower which has 
been evolved by the Society of Automobile Engineers, the 
national engineering body in the United States. And there- 
fore one would have to have a copy of that table to know just 
what horsepower rating to give their car, also what amount to 
pay. 

J. W. Leavitt, the head of J. W. Leavitt & Company, agents 
for the Overland cars, has just submitted a copy of this table 
for the benefit of the public, and those who will have to pay the 
tax. Leavitt, in speaking of the table, says : 

"While this table may not give the actual horsepower, it 
will, however, give as near as possible as it is to figure out the 
actual horsepower, and it is just in its determination for the 
rating of its tax. The table has been worked out scientifically 
by men who thoroughly understand the motor car engine, and it 
can be safely accepted as a standard on which to base the 
taxes." 

The following table is the table which gives the bore and the 
horsepower for one, two, four and six-cylinder; all one has to 
do is to find out the bore of their cylinder, then under the num- 
ber of cylinders the car has is found their horsepower, and 
according to their horsepower checks can be made out accord- 
ing to the law. 



SO 5-8 


15-16 


53 


79 1-2 


55 1-4 


82 9-10 


57 3-5 


:-5 



5 5-8 12 5-8 25 5-16 

5 3-4 13 1-4 26 1-2 

5 7 -8 13 13-16 27 5-8 

6 14 2-5 28 4-5 

* » * 

Going to the New York Shows 

In line with their usual progressive policy, Hughson & Mer- 
ton, Inc., are sending back to the New York shows the managers 
of their various branches in Portland, Los Angeles and Seattle, 
for the purpose of studying automobile conditions in general 
and the improvement in accessories in particular. In discussing 




William L. Hughson 



Norman Cowan 



Bore- 








— Horsepo 


wer — 




Inches 


ICyl. 


2Cyl. 


4Cyl. 


6Cyl. 


2 1-2 


2 


1-2 


5 




10 




15 


2 5-8 


2 


3-4 


5 


1-2 


11 




16 1-2 


2 3-4 


3 




6 




12 


1-10 


18 1-5 


2 7-8 


3 5-16 


6 5-8 


13 


1-4 


19 7-8 


3 


..3 


3-5 


7 


1-5 


14 


2-5 


21 3-5 


3 1-8 


3 


15-16 


7 


13-16 


15 


5-8 


23 7-16 


3 1-4 


4 


l-A 


8 


1-2 


16 


9-10 


25 2-5 


3 3-8 


4 


9-16 


9 


1-8 


18 


1-4 


27 2-5 


3 1-2 


4 


9-10 


9 


4-5 


19 


3-5 


29 2-5 


3 5-8 


5 


1-A 


10 


1-2 


20 


1-4 


31 3-5 


3 3-4 


5 


5-8 


11 


1-4 


22 


1-2 


33 3-4 


3 7-8 


6 




12 




24 




36 1-16 


4 


6 


2-5 


12 


4-5 


25 


3-5 


38 2-5 


4 1-8 


6 


13-16 


13 


5-8 


27 


1-4 


40 9-10 


4 1-4 


7 


1-4 


14 


1-2 


28 


9-10 


43 4-5 


4 3-8 


7 


5-8 


15 


5-16 


38 


5-8 


45 15-16 


4 1-2 


8 


1-10 


16 


1-5 


32 


2-5 


48 3-5 


4 5-8 


8 


9-16 


17 


1-8 


34 


1-4 


51 3-5 


4 3-4 


9 




18 




36 


1-10 


54 1-10 


4 7-8 


9 


1-2 


19 




38 




57 


5 


10 




20 




40 




60 


5 1-8 


10 


1-2 


21 




42 




63 


5 1-4 


11 




22 




44 


1-10 


66 1-5 


5 3-8 


11 


9-16 


23 




46 




69 1-10 


5 1-2 


12 


1-10 


24 


1-5 


48 


2-5 


72 3-5 




PACIFIC KISSEL-KAR BRANCH 

Van Nesa and Golden Gate Avei., San Franclaco 
We Sell on Easy Terma 

Standard Modela 
Prlcea F. O. B. Factory. 



Model— 

Tourinff Care 
Runabouts 
Town Oars ■ 



Price 

500 
750 



AMERICAW 

ili UNDERSLUNG X ^ 



American Motors California Co 

476482 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco 

Prices V O. H Factory 



M3 

f.ll 



l Cylinder, -' l ■ 
6 Cylinder, - r 
6 Cylinder, i Pi 
fi Cylind 



this trip, Mr. Norman Cowan, their sales manager, says that he 
thinks this policy should be followed by every large concern on 
the Pacific Coast, as the information and knowledge gained from 
the trip in a short time more than offsets the expense involved. 

Hughson & Merton's branch managers will spend the week 
at the Automobile Show, and then devote the next ten days in 
visiting their various factories, the total trip taking some three 
to four weeks. 

Mr. W. L. Hughson, president of this firm, who is also presi- 
dent of the Pacific Kissel-Kar Co., also Mr. Cowan, are in the 
habit of making this trip every year, but this is the first time 
they have considered the advisability of taking all their mana- 
gers with them. 

• * * 

Uses Harris OH 

"A number of prominent racing drivers on the Pacific Coast 
are now using Harris Oils as lubricants in speed contests. For 
years the Harris product has been the favorite of a number of 
pilots, some of the earliest races having been won by cars lubri- 
cated with these oils. Barney Oldfield, who made a sensational 
showing in the Los Angeles-San Diego, Cal., race recently with 
his Simplex, used Harris oils. 

Likewise in the motorcycle game these lubricants are well 
thought of. Paul C. Derkum, known as "Dare-Devil" Derkum, 
won the San Diego to Phoenix motorcycle road race a few 
weeks ago, banking on Harris oils. He covered the 441 miles 
of desert route in 16 hours. 4 minutes, beating his nearest com- 
petitor by 3 hours 29 minutes. Upon 
winning, he wired the A. W. Harris Oil 
Company at Providence, R. I., as follows: 
"The engine in my Indian, with which I 
won the San Diego-Phoenix race, was 
running perfectly at the finish and sound- 
ed better than ever. It always had the 
kick when wanted, and I give Harris oils 
the credit for this and for the fast time. 
You can say anything you want that is 
good about Harris oils, and I will oack it 
up, as I gave it the hardest test any oil 
has ever had in a long distance motorcycle 
race." 



10 11. I\ 

eo n. p. 
n it p. 

60 H. P. 



Prices 
I ISG0 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 3, 1914. 



Use a Little Care In Driving and Save the Highway 

"A great deal of expense for the up-keep of roads could be 
saved if those who drive vehicles on the highway would use 
a little more consideration and judgment in their driving," says 
B. H. Pratt, the Pacific Coast manager of the Fisk Rubber 
Company. 

"While we are having schools for the instruction of owners 
and professional drivers in the inspecting of their cars, their 
up-keep, etc., yet up to the present time there is no school that 
has been started for scientific driving. A school that would 
teach not only the drivers of motor cars, but of the driver of 
every kind of vehicle that uses the highway how to properly 
drive. To tell the average man that he does not know how to 
drive a horse and wagon, a bicycle, a motorcycle or a motor car 
would bring forth strenuous objections and remarks that might 
not be complimentary, but it is safe to say that ninety per cent 
of the users of the highway do not know how to properly drive. 

"This is conclusively proved by the conditions of the roads, 
even the new State highway right in the vicinity of San Fran- 
cisco. All a person has to do is to see where one vehicle after 
the other has passed over the road; the line is marked as dis- 
tinctly as if drawn with chalk; one driver will follow in the 
tracks of the other, demanding of that section of the road that it 
shall carry the whole traffic. 

"It is a well known fact that this means that that section of 
the road which shows this conditions of affairs has to bear the 
brunt of the travel. If a driver would merely drive to one side 
of these markings, in other words scatter their course across 
the whole surface of the road, it would last much longer. But 
the easiest point of resistance is the one taken by the man, even 
if he knows that he could go at other points. 

"The result is that sooner or later the road has to be repaired, 
falls into decay, and there is a howl of poor construction on the 
part of the builders, and the demand that its construction be 
investigated. 

"Another point where this poor driving is most forcibly mani- 
fested is on the turns of the road. It is these turns that show 
the poor driving most forcibly, for they are the first to be de- 
stroyed. Drivers of horse-drawn vehicles, motorcycles, bicy- 
cles, and motor cars go into turns under speed and skid, which 
is just the same as applying a plane to a piece of wood. The 
side swipe of the vehicle planes the surface of the road, and it 
is but a short time that ruts form and holes appear. 

"Not one out of ten drivers go into a turn on momentum or 
slowing up, but rushes in, and when the car begins to skid, ap- 
plies power to stop the side momentum; the result is, that not 
only is the sides swiped to the road, but a grinding of its surface 
in the attempt to gain momentum on the straightaway. The 
actual time saved or gained by this procedure is small and does 
not compensate for the great destruction that is done. 

"There is absolutely no reason why the turns in the road 
should be the first to feel the need of repair. If the drivers 
would only stop and consider also that they are paying the pen- 
alty themselves in the wear and tear on tires and their motor 
cars, wagons, etc., they might appreciate the condition and be 
more considerate of roads and cars in making turns. This one 
thing shows the need of a scientific school of driving." 

* * * 
A Sensible Christmas 

"Nothing shows the tendency of mankind more than the pres- 
ents that he buys at Christmas time," says Henry D. McCoy, of 
Chanslor & Lyon Co. "This past Christmas will go down in his- 
tory as the 'sensible Christmas,' if it is to be judged by the ac- 
cessories purchased for holiday presents. We always carry 
a certain quality of novelties which can't be considered neces- 
sities. Heretofore we have generally sold out this stock at 
the Christmas time, but this season they are still with us. Very 
few of them have found their way out of the front door or 
through the shipping department. Practically everything that 
has been purchased this year has been of a useful nature, some- 
thing that brings a hundred per cent returns for its use. 

"From these indications in trade one sees the effects of the 
motor car on the life of mankind. It is broadening him out. 
The follies and fancies are waning in his consideration. The 
fictitious pleasures born of a desire of excitement, made neces- 
sary from a restricted life amid city walls, is giving way to a 
higher plane of thought and pleasure demanded by a life in 
the open country that has been made possible by the motor car. 



-r>le 'W$sTfW CifiJH(f/<;e" fffjajyt. ^ccjp^ -Po^/c/ 

o< *y f tf/wfo CqsJjcrf Cojpijt/f v jojt the 
o//f YjsjJ WyJr. 

— VMYf— 

qsi( t)JY f)"Tc*f<XB>(.e OwVf^. Js/{ /fiy //ovs/ 







Phone Sutter 300 



Pacific Sightseeing Co., Prop. 



FOURTH ST. GARAGE 

FOURTH & HARRISON STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Commercial Trucks Automobile 

A Specialty Supplies 

The attention of owners of pleasure cars living In San Mateo 
County is called to the convenience of this Garage to Third 
and Townsend Street Depot. 

THE LARGEST GROUND FLOOR FIREPROOF GARAGE WEST OF CHICAGO 



PHOTOGRAPHS 



Call on us when you want photographs of any kind. 
We can and will please you. Our new studio, the 
largest west of New York, covers 9,000 square feet of 
floor space, and Is completely equipped for every branch 
of our business. You are cordially Invited to call and 
we will be very glad to take you through the different 
departments, portrait, commercial, copying, enlarging, 
Kodak, etc. You will be interested. 

ARTHUR SPAULDING CO., 
Everything In Modern Photography. 

625-633 Eddy St., San Francisco, Cat. 
Phones—Franklin 1184. Home C 4084. 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 



INSURED AGAINST 



Fire, Theft and Transportation 

While anywhere in United States, Canada and Europe 



>£TNA INSURANCE CO. 



OF HARTFORD 
PACIFIC BRANCH— 325 California Street, 



Sin Friociico 



Tips to Automobi lists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 
The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It at a guide: 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
SAN JOSE.— Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for flrst-claas service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlors for ladles In connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and SL James Sts. 

SAN JOSE.— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North 1-irst street. The best French 
dinner in California, 76 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 



PALO ALTO.— PALO ALTO GARAGE. 443 Emmereon SL Tel., P. A. 
333. Auto livery at all hours. Tires and sundries In stock. Gasoline, oil, 
repairing, lathework, vulcanizing. Open day and night. 



January 3, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



27 



"Hence it is that people to-day arc I uying presents that will 
produce the greatest pleasure, not on'y appealing to the artistic 
sense, but also with a usefulness tr :t lightens the labor and 
smoothes the path of mankind. 

"In days gone by, accessories had t be bright and attractive, 
bordering on the 'noisy;' anything that ttracted attention found 
favor. To-day it is different. Access ries must be subdued in 
coloring, must have a usefulness, and the less attention they at- 
tract the better, showing that the motor car is slowly but surely 
wiping out the 'it' in mankind." 

* * * 
A Shortage of Motor Cars 

"The general public does not know it, but there is certainly 
going to be a shortage of motor cars the coming season," says 
W. C. Hood, commercial manager of the Empire Automobile 
Company, who is visiting Osen-McFarland Automobile Com- 
pany, agents for the Empire car. 

Hood is well known in San Francisco, having been here as 
representative of the Chalmers factory and several other well- 
known manufacturers of motor cars, and his long experience 
in the automobile trade puts him in the position to know of what 
he is speaking. 

Hood says : "There has been a conservative movement on the 
part of manufacturers in building this season. The condition of 
the financial market has caused manufacturers to cut down their 
output which was planned a year ago. The new administration 
at Washington, and the action taken there has caused a sort of 
stagnation in business throughout the United States; hence fear- 
ing that there might be an over production, the conservative 
manufacturer has cut down his output. 

"Now, however, the financial atmosphere is clearing up, and 
the outlook throughout the United States is that the coming 
season will be as prosperous as any one that we enjoyed lately; 



this means that the general public will have as much money to 
spend as heretofore, and likewise there will be as man; motor 
cars sold as in previous years. But the output as figured now 
will not meet this demand. There is going to be a sh , 
new cars when the real selling season begins. Ther : is no 
question but that there will be many who will have to ; o with- 
out a new car this season. That is, if they expect to buy one 
of these standard makes." 



Owners Can Have Bodies of Own Design on Cars 

"The day of a stock body on a high-grade automobile is pass- 
ing. By the high grade, high price, is meant the cars that de- 
mand a good price on account of their superiority. These cars 
are now being equipped with bodies that are especially ordered 
for the owners. 

Bentel has just returned from an extended trip through the 
East, where he visited the Mercer factory in Trenton, N. J., 
and the Simplex factory in New York. It was while on this 
trip that he had the chance to observe the trend of trade and the 
desire of the automobile buyer. 

In speaking of the general tendency of purchasers to invest 
in individual or especially built bodies on high grade chassis 
he said: "The day when a factory could build a body to their 
own liking and place it on the market, expecting its sale, is 
passing very quickly, and like the custom now in vogue abroad, 
especially in France and England, buyers are demanding that 
the bodies be especially built to suit their immediate needs and 
their desires. This gives a variety of vehicles that does away 
with the taxicab or rent car aspect that has been the case in 
years gone by. It is a well-known fact that some of the best 
cars built have large prestige with the buyer on account of their 
superiority, which attracted the rent car owner and taxicab 
company." 



If you want to prolong the life 
of your engine, 

If you want to eliminate smoke 
and carbon, 
n m r-r\ t— v t If you want to reduce your oil 

MoloRoL —* 

Use MoToRoL 
"It suits because It doesn't soot" 

Hughson & Merton, Inc. 

530 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cat. 


There is nothing in Goodrich Advertising 
that isn't in Goodrich Goods 

Goodrich £ Tires 

Best in the Long Run 

There are forty-three years of experience in 
rubber manufacturing in every Goodrich Tire 

THE B. F. GOODRICH COMPANY 

Everything that's best in Rubber 
341-347 Market Street San Francisco 

Los Angeles Oakland Fresno Sacramento 


LIGHT YOUR AUTOMOBILE WITH THE 

DYNETO Automatic Electric Lighting System 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 
Pacific Com Agrim 
630 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 
CALL AND SEE DEMONSTRATION 


AUTO FENDER & RADIATOR WORKS 

Make and Repair 

Fenders, Radiators, Hoods, Metal Bodies, Tanks, 

Dash Shields. Lamps, Mud Pans. Tool 

Boxes, Metal Spinning. Etc. 

466 Golden Gate Ave. 32-34 Van Ness Ave. 

Phone Franklin 6460 Phone Market 6409 


Full factory equipment on all Pack 

1 1 ttf^ f-^.\ tr-n ft ards, Oldsmoblles. Coles, Thomas and 

HUUVt'.K Seven others. Absolutely perfect. 

Full set of four — $14 to Sit. Under 

AI1X1I IARY SPRINfi & compress. on by heavy loads, roujh 

AUA1L1SP.I orrumvj <X roads or bumps. Under all conditions 

rides as easv as on asphalt. Impos- 
SHOCK ABSORBER slble to break springs. No competition 

HOOVER SPRING CO. 
617 Turk St.. San Francisco 


PEART & ELKINGTON 

VULCANIZING *-■—«• 

42 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 


Machinists and Engineers 
V C CM AM DnAp Automobile Repairing a Specialty 

IxccInAIN bKUo. jso Gold ,„ G ,„ Av , nu ,. „„. Hyde 

and Laikln Streets 
Pbontv Franklin »li). HaaaaJam 


FREE FROM CARBON 
PANHARD L. H. 4 B. I. BILL, 
/'^kTT S43 Oolden Gate Ave 
^-' ■»■ ■*— ' San Francisco. Cal. 



28 



San F 



rancisco 



News Letter 



January 3, 1914. 




It would seem that a poor country like Japan, and one so 
:eavily taxed, cannot afford to go to war with the United States. 



Remarkable Protest of France and Germany. 

"We won't pay for war — we won't be governed by the 
sword." 

In brief, that sentence summarizes the remarkable protest 
almost simultaneous!}' formulated in the French Chamber of 
deputies and in the German Reichstag. In a word, it means that 
these two nations are weary of militarism, its burdens and the 
insolence of the military caste. In both of these parliamentary 
bodies overwhelming votes of want of confidence in the respec- 
tive ministries were adopted by way of notice expressing the 
popular sentiment. The crises in both bodies are interpreted 
by the London Nation in this wise : 

"Peace hath her victories. Virtually two European Gov- 
ernments have in one week fallen under the stroke of her 
sword. Who will make the third ? The real discussion in 
the French Chamber and the German Reichstag was the 
Franco-German war. For three-and-forty years they have 
labored the theme at intervals, and in proportion as the 
event recedes in time the discussion becomes ever more 
absorbing. We are nearing the time when they will discuss 
nothing else. For what else do the debates of this week 
mean ? In France, a Ministry has been overthrown because 
the Chamber disliked the expedients which it had proposed 
to cover its military expenditure by means of a privileged 
loan. That military expenditure was in its turn, nothing 
but one effort the more to cope by extraordinary sacrifices 
with the numerical preponderance of the armed German 
race, and to station on the Eastern frontier forces adequate 
to defend it — and, perhaps, to do something more. 

"In the Reichstag (which spent the best part of the year 
over similar financial problems due to a similar cause) the 
passions of the House were stirred by a series of exhibi- 
tions of military insolence and brutality, perpetrated by a 
German regiment in Alsace. These incidents meant two 
things. They meant in the first place that the government 
of Alsace is still, after three-and-forty years, a perennial 
military conquest, and in the minds of the army and the 
Prussian ruling caste even the second generations of the 
annexed population must still be held down by arms. They 
meant, in the second place, that the German military idea 
of the functions and importance of an army is still so in- 
flated that the 'honor' of the soldier is held to take prece- 
dence over the safety and self-respect of the citizen and the 
sanctity of the civil law. The German Ministry, after that 
crushing vote of censure, would have gone the way of the 
French if Germany were ruled by responsible Ministers. 
Neither country can quite shake off the damnable inheri- 
tance of 1870. But both are weary of it." 



Japanese Commerce With the United States. 

Some light on our relations with Japan may be drawn from 
a consular report from Yokohama, which shows that this coun- 
try is Japan's best customer, exceeding all others in the volume 
of exports and imports. The table follows : 

Countries — Imports, 1913 Exports, 1913 

Australia $ 3,551,746 $ 1,549,116 

British India 56,556,674 7,070,655 

China 14,526,116 38,276,230 

France 1,502,867 12,985,236 

French Indo-China 5,967,127 111,449 

Germany 15,957,153 3,222,607 

Hongkong 253,038 7,566,007 

Italy 265,826 5,492,573 

Kwantung Province 10,060,725 7,989,528 

Netherlands India 9,164,473 1,246,067 

United Kingdom 31,089,147 7,902,906 

United States 35,322,851 37,444,339 

All other countries 17,463,198 10,850,977 

Total $201,680,941 $141,707,690 



. arm Products by Parcel Post. 

Now that the parcel post is in full operation in the United 
States, no little interest attaches to British methods for the 
transmission of farm produce by mail. The parcel post is a 
much older institution in Great Britain than in this country, and 
accordingly our people may get some useful hints from the re- 
port of the deputy Consul General in London, who writes: 

"The privilege of transmitting farm produce, such as 
butter, eggs, cheese, meat, fruit and fresh vegetables, by 
parcel post in the United Kingdom is not very generally 
utilized, most farm produce being sent to neighboring mar- 
kets by carts or wagons, or sold to dealers and retail stores 
in the surrounding towns, while in many instances pro- 
ducers are under contract to sell their whole output to fac- 
tors or wholesale merchants. 

"Small farm or poultry keepers advertise in the press 
their produce for sale, and where only small quantities are 
desired, the parcel post system is the usual mode of trans- 
mission. Meat is scarcely ever sent by post, the joints be- 
ing usually enclosed in bass bags and sent either by for- 
warding agents or by rail. Butter sent by post is usually 
wrapped in grease-proof paper, inclosed in corrugated card 
packing, and then placed in stout cardboard boxes, or 
sometimes in wooden receptacles. Eggs in small quantities 
are packed either in paper, shavings or sawdust in stout 
cardboard boxes fitted with sectional divisions for each 
egg; but for quantities of three dozen or more, special 
wooden boxes fitted with similar divisions are used, and 
the packages are despatched by forwarding agents or rail. 
Cheese is seldom sent by parcel post, except small cream 
varieties." 



"Mrs. Brown has the kleptomania." "Indeed; what is 

she taking for it?" "Anything that looks good to her." — New 
York Times. 





The wonderful land of the Pharaoh* 
The Home of Romance and Mystery 
The Winter Playground of the World 
The Egyptian State Railways have made the 
marvels of ancient Egypt easily accessible by a 
sumptuous service of fast expresses and trains de Luxe, 
serving all noteworthy centers. 

Luxor — 13'< hours from Cairo Assouan — 19 bonri from Cairo 
Fare, $15.45, mdoding sleeper Fere, $19.95. mdudne sleeper 10 Uxor 

Up-to-date Hotels. Winter Palace and Luxor Hotel, Luxor, 
Upper Egypt. Cataract Hotel, Savoy Hotel and Grand Hotel, 
Assouan. Upper Egypt. 

For illustrated pamphlets, information and tickets, apply to 
American Agency of 

EGYPTIAN STATE RAILWAYS 

281 Fifth Avenue, New York City, or to any local Steamship Agency 



BRUSHES 



623 Sacramento Street, between 
Kearny and Montgomery Streets 



With full line of Brushes, Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 

to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders. Buckets, Chamois. Metal 

Polieb and Cleaning Powders. Hardware, Wood and Willow Ware. 

Call, write or telephone Kearny 5787 

WM. BUCHANAN 



January 3, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



29 




HORACE'S FAMOUS "INTEGER VITAE" 

As a disciple of "imagiste" verse, futurist painting and post- 
impressionist prose would translate it. 

Listen, 

Aristus Fuscus, 

it is not the quiver 

bursting with arrows, 

nor sudden spears, 

nor certainly the warmth of 

confident armor 

that shields 

a man . . . 

Here is a wood 

full of blue winds 

and dead symbols; 

full of sick sounds 

and invisible flowers . . . 

why should I tremble . .. 

Now let me sing of you, 

plangent and conquering . . . 

with furious hair, 

and fluent caresses . . . 

why should I tremble, 

and stammer 

like moonlight 

caught in black branches. . . . 

Now like a fish 

in the net of to-morrow, 

let my heart batten 

on the thought of your face; 

let my soul feed 

on the red rind of passion, 

softly . . . exulting! 

Let me remember 
climate and javelins, 
laughter and Lalange, 
Virtue and wolves . . . 
and so forth . . . 

— Louis Untermeyer in Smart Set. 



THE CHRISTMAS NEWS LETTER. 

Christmas Number, 1913, of the San Francisco News Letter 
is remarkable among holiday publications for its illuminated 
advertising pages and the number and excellence of its illus- 
trations of scenes in California. The full page Chinese cobbler 
is not only a work of art, but a memorial of a vanishing era, 
for the old time Chinatown is no more, and such scenes will 
soon be as scarce as wigwams. A Yosemite page with prim- 
roses in the foreground and the Half Dome in the distance is 
also notable. Another full page is a scene on the Cliff Drive, 
Santa Cruz. The entire edition is a wonderful testimonial to 
the. city that is, which has arisen, over the city that was. Re- 
ferring to this, the News Letter says : "To-day, but seven and a 
half years after the greatest calamity that has ever struck a 
community in recorded history, San Francisco is a more beau- 
tiful city than ever. Was there ever before a city built in less 
than eight years — a city of magnificent hotels, office buildings 
and theatres; of stately residences and apartment houses sec- 
ond to none in the world — where, within the memory of young 
children, was a scene of desolation so staggering that it gave 
one the blues merely to contemplate it?" — Santa Cru: Surf. 



TELLS THREE-TOED HORSES' AGE BY THEIR TEETH. 

A three-toed horse, no bigger than a sheep, that liv •: ■.': in the 
Mojave Desert at least a million years ago, is describi 
first time by Professor John C. Merriam in a paper jus 
by the University of California. This little horse is em, 
the fossil stud-book as "Parahippus mourningi." 

The "Forest Horse" is another new discovery told of in the 
same paper. This ancient equine lived near what is now Wal- 
ker Lake, in Nevada. It was as big as a colt. Dr. Merriam has 
christened this new sub-genus "Drymohippus." 

These ancestral relatives of old Dobbin have been described 
from a few splintered bones and a few teeth, chiseled into view 
from the rock slabs in which they had lain buried a matter of 
ten thousand centuries. But there is so much character in a 
single one of these ancient horse-teeth that the relationship is 
perfectly plain to the numerous species of American horses 
which have flourished and disappeared since Miocene times, 
and to the horses, donkeys and zebras of to-day. Moreover, 
going back up the ages, comparison with the teeth of a tiny 
Eocene horse shows undeniable kinship with this vastly old 
doll-pony, which was no bigger than a fox. 

A few teeth are all the scientist has had, usually, from which 
to describe the species of horse that inhabited California in 
Pleistocene times. But from the wonderful asphalt beds of 
Rancho La Brea have come now eleven complete and perfectly 
preserved skulls of the Equus occidentalis, a horse as big as 
the horse of to-day, that roamed California say 250,000 years 
ago. In another paper just published by the University of Cali- 
fornia, Professor Merriam gives a "Preliminary Report on the 
Horses of Rancho La Brea," which describes foals, adults and 
old horses with teeth worn down by a lifetime of chewing. 
Never before has such complete material been available for 
knowledge by any extinct American species of horse. 

SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



Hitchcock Military Academy 

SAN RAFAEL, CAL. 

THE ONLY SCHOOL IN THE WEST HAVING 
SEPARATE ROOMS FOR EACH BOY 

Accredited; Large Campus Gymnasium, Indoor 
Rifle Range.Cadets may enter any time of the 
year. Summer camp on Eel River, June to 
August. 

Principals 
REX W. SHERER S. J. HALLEY 



Miss Harker's School p ^?^l° 

Boarding and Day School (or Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mills. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nun* 
for younger children. Ninth year. 

Catalogue upon application. 



A. W. Beift 




Alice BeA 


BEST'S 


ART 


SCHOOL 


1625 California Street 

Illustrating 
Life Claaaaa Sketching 
Day and Niaht Palntlnr 



"Is that the same fellow we saw doing stunts in his aero- 
plane?" "When was that?" "About s t months ago." "Well, 
hardly."— Life. 



MANZANITA HALL 

Palo Alto, California 

Prepares boys for all courses in Stanford University- 
A healthful home school— thorough, efficient, growing, 
progressive. Next term begins January 6, 1914. 
Catalogue sent on request. 

W. A. SHEDD, Head Master. 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 3, 1914. 



THE CANDID FRIEND 



(Continued from Page 7.) 
Jack London's Adventure. 

Still less has the canal become an artery of commerce opening 
the way for an eager and insistent trade. It was only last week 
when Jack London, bound on a voyage of discovery in his sloop, 
the Sea Wolf, dared the perils of the raging canal, but found 
himself blocked midway by a drawbridge which would not 
draw, so long had it suffered from a condition of commercial 
desuetude that it had grown rusty, and had forgotten its pur- 
pose. The Oakland Tribune tells what happened : 

"Government and county employees with crowbars, jim- 
mies and even a latent keg of dynamite are struggling like 
the combatants in the War of the Worlds to pry the draw, 
which seldom spins, from the rust of ages and cease to stop 
navigation in the waterway. Up to an early hour this after- 
noon, the 'Sea Wolf barked furiously for action, but got no 
results. He was still anchored in the channel and the draw- 
bridge refused to yield to the pressure of the pry or to the 
cuss words of the 'Wolf's' crew. In the meantime, London, 
like patience on a monument, stood on the forecastle, smil- 
ing at grief, while the ark dwellers along the canal shout to 
him, 'Hello, Jack,' and 'How do you like it?' " 
The canal has become an asylum or refuge for the ark 
dwellers, who roost like mud hens on its hospitable and untrou- 
bled waters, careless whether school keeps or not, whether 
commerce drives or dribbles. The ships do not pass unless 
they can climb a fence. To be sure, the adventurous London 
finally broke the blockade, but it was not until the war depart- 
ment had argued with the rusty and disobedient apparatus for 
half a day or more. 

It is all in the family, and the taxpayer foots the bill. The 
Alameda tidal canal that carries nothing but mud is first cousin 
to the San Francisco municipal incinerator, which burns noth- 
ing but money. 

o- b" ^ 

A Hot and Peppery Scott. 

"The Knave," writing in the Oakland Tribune, recalls the 
checkered career of Hector Gordon, a clever newspaperman who 
wrote the famous verses entitled "Hoch der Kaiser," which got 
Rear-Admiral Coghlan into so much trouble on the occasion 
when he committed lese majeste by reciting that blasphemous 
lyric at a New York social affair. "The Knave" says Gordon 
worked on the San Francisco press, which is true, and he might 
have added that the eccentric Scotchman was a member of the 
Tribune staff for a brief spell. He never stayed long anywhere, 
for he had an ungovernable temper that usually got him into 
trouble. Gordon was a Highlander, and prided himself on his 
high descent from illustrious chieftains. His pet aversion was 
the Lowland Scots, and he cordially detested Alexander Doig, 
the amiable and capable foreman of the Tribune composing 
room, for no other reason than that he was born south of the 
Grampian Hills. 

S o- S 
Cursed the Editor. 

Gordon, wherever he went, was followed around by his dog, 
a cocker spaniel. One day, while he was at work on a San 
Francisco morning paper, the managing editor happened into 
the local room. Inadvertently he trod on the dog's tail, and 
Ihe animal let out a blood-curdling yelp. The editor jumped 
stiff -legged like a man scared out of a year's growth. 

"Who brought that damned brute in here?" he shouted. 

Gordon arose in his wrath thereupon, and cursed that editor 
with edifying solemnity and a fine flow of language. Then he 
put on his coat and walked out of the office. 




The New Poodle Dog 



HOTEL 

and 

RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: Franklin 2960 Home C 6705 





MAISON DOREE 

HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

161-157 Ellis si r.--i 17 Glasgow Stree 

Phone Douglas 1O40 

TRY OUR SPECIAL 

50c 4-COURSE QUICK LUNCHEON 

With Claret, or Glass of Beer, Tea or Coffee 

From 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. 

OUR tl.OO DINNERS ARE, POSITIVELY 
THE BEST IN TOWN 



BLANCO'S 



OTarrell and Larkin 
Streets 



Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without seeing the 
finest cafe in America 



Sutter 1672 
Horn. C 3870 
Home C 4781. Hotel 



Cyril Arnanton 
Henry Rlttman 
C. Lahederne 



NEW DELMONICO'S 

(FORMERLY MAISON TORTONI) 
RESTAURANT AND HOTEL NOW OPEN 

Best French Dinner In the City with Wine, St.oe. Banquet Halls and Private 

Dining Rooms. Music Every Evening. 
362 Geary Street San Franclaco 



1. Berfti 



C. Hailhebuau 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old POODLE DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT EVERY EVENING 
415-421 Bush St.. Sea Fraocisco (Above Keeray) ExcheBee. Douglas 2411 



JULES RESTAURANT «X% ck f. Icicle 3 

Commencing Wednesday, November 12th 

Every Afternoon from 2 to 5 

DIRECT FROM HONOLULU 

PRINCE JACK HELELUHE 

and His Hawaiian Entertainers 

JULES WITTMANN, Proprietor Phone Kearny 1812 



January 3, 1914. 



and California Advertise! 



31 




In the Home of the Sea-Elephants. 

In Harper's Magazine for January, Robert C. Murphy gives 
the first account of his recent expedition to the sub-antarctic 
island of South Georgia, twelve hundred miles east of Cape 
Horn. His account of his adventures with the sea-elephants is 
of curious interest : 

"They are instinctively ill-tempered mammals, and seem 
never to become accustomed to the society of other creatures. 
They snarled, for instance, altogether unnecessarily, at any 
poor familiar penguin which happened to walk near them along 
the beach of the inlet. From the tent I frequently saw half- 
grown bulls wake from peaceful naps and instantly start quar- 
rels with near neighbors; and the youngest pups were quite as 
likely as their elders to be rearing and bumping against one 
another, glaring with infantile ferocity into one another's eyes. 
In the ordinary contests of the bulls, which seemed to be of 
a purely calisthenic nature, the two champions met closely and 
reared up until only the hinder part of the belly rested on the 
ground, and then hurled themselves one against the other, 
clashing their breasts and raking each other's thick-skinned 
necks with their heavy lower canines, at the same time fling- 
ing their tail ends into the air. Occasionally they came to a 
clinch by pressing the sides of their necks together and so took 
a breathing spell. All the motions were clumsy and lumbering ; 
a good deal of threatening and sputtering occurred between the 
clashes, and sometimes they merely rose up on the toes of their 
foreflippers and stood rigidly, with heads held back and mouths 
wide open, until each collapsed from weariness without a blow 
having been struck. Thoroughly angry bulls, however, clamped 
jaws on their rivals, badly lacerating one another's pelts. I 
saw one big fellow which had lost a good portion of the wall of 
his snout. If a group of sea-elephants were annoyed, they 
sometimes gave way to uncontrolled passion, thrashing about 
blindly, biting the ground, running amuck, and tearing the backs 
of all their companions. Generally their tactics with regard to 
human beings were wholly defensive, but occasionally I met a 
jealous or pugnacious bull which sought trouble from the start. 
Once I observed from a hiding-place an unusually fine sea- 
elephant come out of the cove below my tent and work its way 
up among the tussock hummocks. I wanted its skeleton for the 
Museum, but unfortunately had left my rifle aboard the brig." 



Dreiser on English Train Service. 

"I can prove in a moment by any traveler that our trains are 
infinitely more luxurious than the trains in England. I can see 
where there isn't heat enough, and where one lavatory for men 
and women on any train, let alone a first-class one, is an abomi- 
nation; and so on and so forth. But still, and notwithstanding, 
I say the English railway service is better. Why? Because it's 
more human; it's more considerate. You aren't driven and urged 
to step lively and called at in loud, harsh voices and made to 
feel that you are being tolerated aboard something that was 
never made for you at all, but for the employees of the com- 
pany. In England the trains are run for the people, not the 
people for the trains." 

From Theodore Dreiser's "A Traveler at Forty." 



Who Wrote Home? 

Basil King, author of "The Inner Shrine," is the writer most 
recently accused of having written the anonymous story, 
"Home," the fourth and last installment of which will be pub- 
lished in the January Century. The authorship of this stirring 
novel has been attributed to many well known writers, including 
Mary McNeill Fenellosa, Richard Harding Davis, Mary Hea- 
ton Vorse, David Gray, Basil King, and Meredith Nicholson. 
The author's vivid pictures of America and the tropics would 
indicate a wide knowledge of the world. The publishers have 
announced that "Home" was writter. by a member of the 
diplomatic or consular service of the I nited States, but no fur- 
ther official information has been forthcoming. 



What to do When a Grizzly Faces You. 

George Bird Grinnell, editor of the recently publisl: 1 'Hunt- 
ing at High Altitudes," says that Colonel Pick' sport- 
ing reminiscences are included in that volume, had , 
greater experience of the grizzly than any other man .vho ever 
lived. One of that animal's peculiarities noted by Colonel 
Pickett was the different way it acts when shot at from ambush 
or in front. If he does not see the hunter, its first idea is to 
get out of danger. On the other hand, he said he had never 
known of an instance when the grizzly, if he saw whence the 
bullet came, did not start directly for the person who shot at 
him. The safest course then was to deliver shots as fast as 
possible, and as a last resort to use the rifle as a club. 



Tennis for Girls. 

Miriam Hall has written a compact and interesting manual 
entitled "Tennis for Girls," in which she explains in a lucid 
fashion the nature and the rationale of the several strokes used 
in the game, with some useful advice on tactics and general- 
ship, and she concludes: "Be a modest, gracious winner and 
a generous loser; this is true sportsmanship." Obviously, Miss 
Hall is herself a good sport. 

Published by A. M. Robertson, San Francisco. Price, 75c. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. (AdYertisement) 



TAKE a 
TRIP 
TO and 
THROUGH the 

PANAMA CANAL 

THIS WINTER 

2 CRUISES 
February 28 March 17, 1914 

$125 and up 

Per S. S. "KRONPRINZESSIN CECILIE" 

Secure Rooms NOW 



OTHER PLEASURE CRUISES 

5 Panama Canal — West Indies from New York. 
S. S. "Cleveland" 93 days Orient — India Cruise. 
S. S. "Cleveland" 135 days Around-the-World Cruise. 



Handsomely Illustrated Pamplets Sent on Application 

Hamburg-American Line 

160 Powell Street San Francisco 



BUZZELL ELECTRIC WORKS 

543-545 Sansome Street 
Motors and armatures repaired and rewound. Gen- 
eral machine work and all kinds of electrical equipment 
repaired. We buy, rent, exchange and Inspect motors. 
Phone Douglas 3373 Night Phone Mission 3128 



LUABLE NEWSPAPER INFORMATION 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau 

S8 FIRST STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Phones: Kearny 392 J 1538 

CLIPPINGS OF ANYTHINQ YOU WISH 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 3, 1914. 




Toots — It takes an artist to mix a coc.klail according to 

the experts. Tanks — I dare say. I've seen a cocktail mix an 
artist. Ex. 

"So this is your idea of wit, eh?" said the editor, as he 

read Wagg's jokes. "Yes, it is," said Wagg. "Well, the idea is 
certainly original," said the editor. — Puck. 

Mother — You should save your money, Willie. The price 

of everything is going up. Willie — Then why save it, mamma? 
The longer I save it the less you can buy with it \—Puck. 

"Housekeeping in a small flat has its problems." "How 

now?" "My wife is kicking because she has to buy 5 cents' 
worth of ice to preserve 4 cents' worth of milk." — Ex. 

"I took a long walk yesterday," said Boreman, as he 

collapsed into a seat at Busyman's desk. "Take another, old 
man," suggested Busyman; "it'll do us both good." — Ex. 

"My blase son has managed to get up some enthusiasm 

over the opening of the Panama Canal." "So?" "Yes; he ad- 
mits he never saw anything bigger than that in vaudeville." — 
Ex. 

Mrs. Newgold — Genevieve — Albertine — you are not 

playing that duet together. One of you is a bar ahead of the 
other. Genevieve (proudly) — Well, I was the one ahead, any- 



way 



!— Ex. 



"I always said that political rival of mine would stoop to 

any falsehood. Now I can prove it." "How?" "He sent me 
a message saying he congratulates me on my election." — Wash- 
ington Star. 

"I don't believe you care for me as you used to," she 

complained. "Perhaps I don't," he replied, as he looked over 
the month's bills, "but you certainly are dearer to me than 
ever." — Ex. 

"Seen Wombat's Magazine this month ?" "No ; what's in 

it?" "A complete novel, a short history of the United States, 
all the regular features and a complete dictionary. All for 10 
cents." — Ex. 

"James, I understand the fogs are thick in London." "I 

remember one, sir, that held for three months. I was working 
on a tunnel, sir, and we cut a ninety-foot tunnel through a sixty- 
foot hill." — Ex. 

"Spain is the land of story and song. What traditions 

of daring knighthood cling around old England! France, too, is 
the realm of ancient romance." "I know. But Indianapolis is 
the clearing house." — Ex. 

"Why do you suppose the Turkish government has sup- 
pressed that magazine ?" "On the ground of immorality. It is 
continually printing poems in which the men are represented 
as having only one wife." — Ex. 

"Why do you advertise for a wife? Couldn't you find 

one in your own circle?" "How many people in your circle?" 
"Well,, fifty, perhaps." "That's just it. Now, I advertised for 
a wife and I had 600 to choose from." — Ex. 

Recruiting Officer — I'm afraid you are not heavy enough 

for a cavalryman. We want men who can ride over everything 
whenever necessary. Applicant — That's all right, Cap. I've 
been a New York chauffeur for seven years. — Ex. 

"Have your head read," droned the street phrenologist. 

"This, my friend, is your bump of honesty. I can tell just how 
honest you are. Have your other bumps read? Only a dollar." 
"All right, go ahead.' "Money in advance, please." — Ex. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets ; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



(AdferUsement) 



Wherever you go 
ask for 



BUFFALO BREWING CO.'S 

LAGER BEER 

On Draught and in Bottles 
at Most First-Class Dealers. 



NEUHAUS & COMPANY 



MERCHANT TAILORS 



Now 
at 



133 Kearny Street Bet sSSS t n5 n F < lolV tler 
To make you acquainted with our new location we will 
make you one of our $35.00 Suits or Overcoats to order 
for $20.00. Fit Guaranteed or No Sale. 
Phone Kearny 5938 (Formerly 506 Market St., S. F., Cal.) 



Telephone Kearny I461 Private Exchange Connecting All Warehouses 

SAN FRANCISCO WAREHOUSE CO. 

Warehousemen Forwarding Agents Distributors Public Weighers 

Spur Track Connections With All Rtilrotdi 

Main Office: 625-647 Third Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



SUMMONS. 
Justices' Court, F No. 33 
IN THE JUSTICES' COURT OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN 

FRANCISCO, STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 
EDWARD W. GUNTHER. ~j Action brought in the Justices' Court 

Plaintiff ( in the City and county of San Fran- 
E. M. CHADBOURNE, ( Cisco, and Complaint filed in the office 

Defendant J of Clerk of said Court. 

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA TO E. M. CHAD- 
BOURNE. 

YOU ARE HEREBY DIRECTED to appear in action brought against 
you by the above named Plaintiff In the Justices' Court of the City and 
County of San Francisco, and to answer to the complaint filed therein; 
within five days (exclusive of the day of service) after the service on you 
of this summons, If served within this County, otherwise within twenty 
days. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you appear and answer as above 
required the said plaintiff will take judgment for any money or damages 
demanded In the Complaint, as arising upon contract, or plaintiff will 
apply to the Court for any other relief demanded In the Complaint. 

This action has been assigned, and you are directed to appear before 
Bernard J. Flood, Esq., one of the Justices of said Court, at his office. 
City Hall, Market street, between Sth and 9th streets, in said City and 
County. 

Make legal service and due return hereon: By order of the Presiding Jus- 
tice of the Peace of the City and County of San Francisco. 

Given under my hand this December 13, 1913. 
EDWARD W. GUNTHER, 
Law and Collection Office, 
Kohl Building, Fifth Floor. 
Cor. Montgomery and California Sts. 

San Francisco. ROBERT W. DENNIS, Justices' Clerk 

Attorhey for Plaintiff. By J. F. COLLINS, Deputy Clerk 

City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavia. Telephone Park 2940. 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D-, D. D. S., Surgeon of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy St., now at room 403 
Westbank Building, corner Ellis and Market. 

ATTORNEYS- AT- LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dr. R. T. Leaner, Surgeon Chiropodist, formerly of 6 Geary street; 
removes corns entirely whole — painless — without knife. Bunions and In- 
growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 212-214 West- 
bank Bldg., 830 Market St Tel. Kearny 3578. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public and Pension Attorney. All legal 
papers drawn up accurately. 217 Montgomery St, above Buph, San Fran- 
cisco. Cal. Phone DoujtIrj 101. 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER 



Dr. Agnew, rectal diseases, Pacific Building, 4th and Market street!. 



37-45 First Street Phone Sutter 223C 

Private Exchange Connecting All Department* 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



BANK OF 
NEW SOUTH WALES 



'ESTABLISHED IS17) 



Paid-up Capital 
Keservo Fund 
Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 

Aggregate Assets 31st 
March. 1913 




- $17,500,000 

11,250,000 

- 17,500,000 

- $46.250,000 
$243,640,881.76 



J. RUSSELL FRENCH, General Manager 



385 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australia States. New Zealand. 
Fiji. Papua (New Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every 
description of Australian Banking Business. Wool and Produce Credits 
Arranged. 

Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET. SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET. E. C 




ANGLO & LONDON 

PARIS NATIONAL 

BANK 



SAN FRANCISCO 


Pk.d-Ur cipiui 


14,000.000 


Surplui nod UodiTidad 


ProfiU il, 600, 000 


ToUt Reiourcoi 


•40.000,000 


OFFICERS; 


HERBERT FLE IS H HACKER Praiid-n. 


510. GREENEBAUM Cbi 


it-man or tbaBoftrd 


WASHINGTON DODGE 


Yirn-Preiitl.nl 


JOS. KRI SOUNDER 


Vic«-Pr9.id. T i. 


c. r. BURT 


Vio*-Pr«iid(int 


R. ALTSCHUL 


Cubiai 


C, R. PARKER 


Aiiiitaat Caihicr 


W1H. H. HIGH 


AiiiiUnt CftihUi 


H CHOTNSKI 


iniilinl Cftihiar 


G. R. BURDICK 


Aisiitftot iiihin 


A L. LANGERHAK 


Bwmvr 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 

ESTABLISHED 1867 



MAD OFFICE. TORONTO 



SIR EDMUND WALKER C.V.O..LL.D..D.C.L. 

President 

ALEXANDFR LAIRD General Manager 

JOHN A1RD Assistant General Manager 



Paid-up Capital $15,000,000 

Reserve Fund 12,500,000 

Aggregate Resource 246,000,000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 



The new Travellers' Cheques recently Issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way in which to carry money when traveling. They are is- 
sued In denominations of 

$10, $20, $50, $100, and $200 

and the exact amount payable In Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland Is stated on the face of each cheque, while in other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. 

450 California Street, corner Leldesdorff 



The German Savings & Loan Society 

Savings (The German Bank) Commercial 

Incorporated 1868 
Membar of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 
526 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
The Following Branches for RECEIPT AND PAYMENT OF DEPOSI'S ONI V 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets 
RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 

S. W. Corner Clement and 7th Avenue 
HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, 

S. W. Corner Haight and Belvedere 

JUNE 30th, 1913 
Assets $ 55,644,983.27 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,757,148.57 

Employees' Pension Fund 158,261.32 

Number of Depositors 62,134 

OFFICE HOURS: 1(1 o'clock A SI. to ->o clock P. M ..oicept Saturdays to 12 o'clock M and 
Satunliy evenings from 6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for receipt of deposits only 



Annual Clearance 

SALE 

BIG REDUCTIONS 

GASSNERyiTRfl 

LOUIS GASSNER 

112-114 Geary St. San Francisco 



Mrs. J. J. HYLAND 

MILLINERY 



Moved to 

177 POST STREET 

4th Floor Liebes Building 



HYLAND MILLINERY COMPANY 



ROOTH'S CRESCENT BRAND 

SARDINES 




A Home Product of the Highest Merit 
Packed on the Famous Bay of Monterey 

The Sardine that is distinguished from 
all by its superior food value and 
flavor. A Pound Can 20c Everywhere. 



Ask your 
Dealer for 

Goodyear 

"Hippo" 

Hose 

R. H. PEASE. 








Tbe bet! fad 

■ trongMt 
Garden Hon 

Guaraataed ta 

mod 700 Ibi 
P real are 

TRY IT AND 

BE CONVINCED 

Sai Fraoctte* 


GOODYEAR 
PreaideaJ W. 


RUBBER COMPANY 
b9l. S93 Market Si. 



You won't use second-rate gasoline 
It's far worse to use second-rate oil! 

HARRIS 

TRADE MARK REGISTERED 

OILS 

have set a standard for over 
26 years. Carefully made 
from the finest Pennsylvania 
Premium Crude Oil, scienti- 
fically tested as to quality. 
Absolutely free from carbon- 
izing matter. 

Small wonder that HARRIS 
and QUALITY are synony- 
mous. Small wondertheygive 
increased power and speed. 

"A little goes a long way and 
every drop counts!" 

A. W. HARRIS OIL COMPANY 



326 S. Water St., Providence. R. I. 



143 No. Wabash Ave.. Chicago. 111. 



PACIFIC COA«T AOENT*. 



CHANSLOR & LYON CO. 

LOS ANGELES OAKLAND SAN FRANCISCO 

SEATTLE FRESNO PORTLAND SPOKANE 




A SATISFACTORY 
ANTI-SKID 

How would you like to have an 
anti-skid that you could put on the 
tires and leave on for thousands of 
miles, so that you would be safe 
from skidding and would be sure 
of obtaining good traction without 
further bother? 

How would you feel if you found 
that this device not only gave trac- 
tion, but also prevented punctures 
and reduced your expense for tires 
enough to pay for itself ? 

Woodworth Treads have proven 
in thousands of cases that they will 
do this, and if the tires on which 
they are used are kept properly in- 
flated and not overloaded, they will 
generally effect a saving of 25 to 
50 per cent over the cost of run- 
ning without them. 

Woodworth Treads are sold by the CHANSLOR & 
LYON CO. of San Francisco, and at all their branches. 

Send for full information to the 

LEATHER TIRE GOODS COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS 
NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK 




US. PAT OF* 



f 

! The Standard Asbestos Brake Lining 

made of the choicest long fibre asbestos. It grips and ho ds 
and is far superior to cheaper products made of short fibre 
asbestos. 
^W, It is specially woven and treated so that it is not affected 

tJ by oil, water or gasoline. It will not fray, ravel or peel. 

Look For The SILVER Edge 
That Signifies Quality and Safety 

and the name Raytestos stamped on every foot 
of "the brake lining that made the automobile 
sjfe." 

Used by the Packard, Pierce Arrow. Peerless, 
Premier, National, Stearns, Stulz and many 
others. In fact. 75% of the car manufacturers 
of this country specify Raybestos because It is 
best by test. Write for Raybestos Booklet. 

The Royal Equipment Co. 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 




CHANSLOR & LYON CO. 
San Francisao Fresno Los Angeles Oakland 

Seattle Spokane 



Portland 



Save Repairs 



Save Money 



Save Trouble 



by replacing; worn out Bearing:* with tne world re- 
nowned HESS-BRIGHTS. All mz<*- CHrri-d In stock 



-W.V.Y 




Pacific Coast Distributors 

CHANSLOR & LYON COMPANY 

San Francisco Oakland Fresno Los Angeles Portland Seattle Spokane 



LARKINS & CO. 

Carriage and Automobile Body Builders 

Established In 1865 
Announces the removal of their Offices and Factory to 

1610-1612-1614 Van Ness Avenue 

Between California and Sacramento Sts. 
Phone Prospect 30 

thhere their entire attention will be devoted to the prompt delivery of 
We best work that a modern plant, high-class mechanics and materials 
can produce. 




WHO IS WORKING THE BELLOWS? 




4 



.65 



Will buy a lot of music for your Grafonola or Victrola. For instance, you 
can get two true tempo tangos; two of the newest popular hits; a plaintive 
lullaby; a negro laughing song; a smashing banjo solo; a descriptive 
orchestra selection; an exquisite violin, flute and harp trio; a classic orches- 
tra selection; a patriotic tenor solo; an old wartime song and two marches. 
The numbers and names are as follows (all ten inch double disc records): 



1429 



1383 



297 



1131 



1157 



360 



1025 



i Tango Bueno 

i Tango South America 

[Apple Blossom Time in Normandie 

) When Dreams Come True 

i Little Alabama Coon 

S Negro Laughing Song 

/Ahoy, My Lads— Banjo 

^Just Pushin' 'Round— Band 

I Herd Girl's Dream 

) Paraphrase on Die Lorelei 

I Maryland, My Maryland 

i Tenting Tonight on the Old Camp Ground 

) National Emblem March 



) Washington Grays' March 

You can purchase these from the following stores in San Francisco and Oakland: 
The Emporium, San Francisco; Clark Wise & Co., 51 Geary St., San Francisco; Kahn's, 
Oakland; Central Phonograph Parlors, 388 12th st, Oakland; G. A. Einselin Jr., 3285 
Mission St., San Francisco; Mission Phonograph and Piano Co., 2358 Mission St. and 
3051 16th St., San Francisco; Lubbe Brothers, 2364 Mission St., 1436 Fillmore St., San 
Francisco and 1911 San Pablo Ave., Oakland. 

Or if you live out of town and can't get them from your local dealer, The Columbia 
Graphophone Company of 334 Sutter St., San Francisco, will send them, by Parcel Post. 
In remitting add postage as follows: 

1st Zone— 10c. 2d Zone-lOc. 3d Zone— 16c. 

Better add 25 cents more and get "Good Night, Little Girl, Good Night," a record that 
will fit yourtalking machine— Victor or Columbia. This is a sample Columbia Double Disc 
Record just issued for the purpose of showing you that Columbia Records can be used on 
either Victor or Columbia Instruments. 





tit.Uuh.d July to. ISM 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific. Coast. 




Vol. LXXXVIL 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, January 10, 1914 



No. 2 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott. 21 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — S. L. Carman, representative, 156 Fifth Ave. 

Chicago Office — Jno. A. Tenney, 452 Peoples Gas Building, Chicago. 

Boston Office — Charles S. Parr, 526 Tremont Temple. 

London Office — George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Matter intended for publication in the current number of the SAN 
FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER should 

be sent to the office not later than 5 p. m. Wednesday. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) — 1 year, $4.00; 6 months, $2.25. 
Foreign — 1 year, $6.00; 6 months, $3.25. 



Have you registered? 

San Mateo County is to have a daily paper — the News. 

Speculation in beach lots on the Los Angeles coast is 

grievously hampered when real estate goes out to sea. 

A San Jose milkman was given a jail sentence of twenty 

days for putting water in his milk. He was an old and perse- 
vering offender. 

They are picking up gold and silver on the Santa Cruz 

beach. One man gathered in $5 and a gold ring, and a news- 
paperman harvested 11 cents. That is about an average. 

Jose Roze, an Oakland bar tender, taking a holiday doze 

in his chair, dreamed he had $1,000,000. Reaching for for- 
tune, his chair slipped, so that he not only missed his grab but 
broke his leg. 

The unemployed ask the Governor for bread, and they 

are given an investigation of the high cost of living. Investiga- 
tions are the stronghold of statesmanship, but they make a 
windy diet. 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Hyatt rashly 

invades "woman's sphere" with a recommendation that a plain 
black dress and white apron should be the approved dress for 
high school girls. 

— —It is ridiculous, in view of the bank clearings of the sev- 
eral coast cities, to talk of any other city on the Pacific Slope 
than San Francisco for the location of a reserve bank under the 
new currency law. 

The figures of the new registration as far as it has pro- 
ceeded give the politicians pause. The promised Progressive 
whirlwind that was to sweep everything before it has, after all, 
seemed to be a rather peaceful blast blowing at about an even 
pace with the straight Republicans and Democrats. It looks 
like an even break. 

The wise hotel manager does not invite himself to take 

part in a free fight, and he is especially leary of that riotous 
casus belli described as "woman's sphere." So when the head 
waiter of the Hotel Fresno saw a lady smoking in the dining 
room, and informed the manager, that official being a wise guy, 
thoughtfully remarked, "Well, they might as well begin to-day 
as to-morrow." So runs the world away. 



The private war between borax locators has broken out 

again at Searls Lake, on the Mojave desert, and the guns are 
unlimbered. Apparently the writ of the commonwealth of Cali- 
fornia does not run on the desert. 

The Exposition site has already become one of the favor- 
ite playgrounds of the people, as was shown by the large at- 
tendance last Sunday. The situation, however, developed a la- 
mentable shortage of transportation. 

A young lady who desired to "demonstrate" the X-ray 

skirt at a performance in San Jose told the chief of police that 
it was a jay town because the censorship would not stand for 
her display. San Jose can stand that. 

Mrs. Fiske grows enthusiastic about the scenery of San 

Francisco Bay. She told a Fresno reporter, speaking of her 
recent visit to this city: "Do you know, I spent three days last 
week on Mt. Tamalpais. And to look off from there — why, 
the Bay of Naples can't compare." 

On Christmas day, Carl Browne, the California agitator, 

undertook to deliver on the steps of the Capitol in Washington 
the speech which he began twenty years ago in the same place, 
but the police would not stand for a cold storage oration. The 
speech is still somewhere in Browne's system. 

The most extraordinary example of misplaced indus- 
try was that of the burglar who, during the holiday season in 
this city bored through four brick walls, and in the course of 
his progress got nothing but a suit of clothes and five bottles of 
champagne, which he drank on the premises. 

A special election for the issue of bonds for $80,000 to 

purchase recreation grounds was held in Sacramento on De- 
cember 29th, but only 10 per cent of the registered voters ap- 
peared at the polls. The proposition was lost by 41 votes. 
What happened to the other 90 per cent of tired business men? 

In explanation of the recent riot of the unemployed in 

Los Angeles, Peter Castorino, an Industrial Worker of the 
World, declared that the United States had disinherited him 
and his fellow members, and therefore the organization plans 
to seize the government so soon as it is strong enough. It 
looks like a big contract. 

The variations of the water lev«l of the Sacramento 

River during the past two weeks have made a perilous time 
for the house boats moored to the levees. In one night the 
river rose nine feet, and then subsided almost as suddenly. 
In consequence, some of the house boats overturned because 
their moorings had become too taut. 

The rains of last week were heavy, while they lasted, 

and if they had been prolonged a day or two might have brought 
a disastrous flood. As it was, they stopped just in time, with 
the result that the damage was inconsiderable and the whole 
State got a good soaking, which will insure plentiful crops, 
full reservoirs, and a larger supply of electric power. 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 10, 1914. 




COMMENT 

— „„ ., ^ 



■4 ; yj%<.$-£$ 



The situation created by the recent 
Meaning and Effect tidelands decision of the State Su- 
Of the preme Court is somewhat confused, 

Tidelands Decision. and is not yet very well understood 

by the layman. Newspaper publi- 
cations, hastily construing the decision, have jumped to the 
conclusion that the State has the right to take back without 
compensation tidelands heretofore sold to private parties. In 
fact, the decision does not go so far, and on the question of re- 
suming the lands without compensation, the majority of the 
court holds against that proposition. Justices Shaw, Angellotti 
and Sloss hold that the State may resume tidelands needed for 
purposes of navigation without compensation paid to those who 
had previously purchased the same. On the other hand, Jus- 
tices Henshaw, Melvin and Lorigan make vigorous dissent from 
the proposition that the land can be resumed without compen- 
sation to the purchasers. 

This alignment makes an even division of the court, with 
Chief Justice Beatty casting the deciding vote. Now, Judge 
Beatty agrees in the main with the opinion written by Judge 
Shaw as to the right of the State to resume at any time such 
tidelands as may be needed for navigation or fisheries, and his 
vote on this, which was the main question, makes it the major- 
ity and prevailing opinion governing the order of the court. 
But on the subsidiary question of compensation to the private 
purchasers, Judge Beatty expressly concurs with Henshaw, 
Lorigan and Melvin. On this matter, Judge Beatty writes : 

"I desire to say that the opinion of Justice Shaw goes too 
far where he says that in grants of tide lands there is re- 
served 'to the State, or its authorized agencies, the right to 
enter upon such lands and make such erections thereon or 
changes therein as it may find necessary or advisable to 
adapt the premises for use in navigation or in furtherance 
thereof.' This means, if I understand it, that where the 
grantee has done nothing to obstruct navigation, the State, 
to carry out any and every sort of plan of its agencies for 
the improvement of a harbor may take back the granted 
land without compensation. As to the question of compen- 
sation the passage of Justice Shaw's opinion above quoted 
is qualified in another place, but even with that qualifica- 
tion it goes too far. I concede that, if after selling a por- 
tion of its tide lands within a bay or natural harbor, the 
State should adopt a comprehensive plan of harbor im- 
provement, such as the establishment of a harbor line and 
the construction of a sea wall with docks and piers on that 
line, any tide land lying beyond that line would be subject 
to the superior right of the public upon equitable compen- 
sation being made to the vendee for his improvements 
taken, and since the vendee would at the same time become 
the absolute owner of that portion of the grant inside of the 
harbor line freed from the former servitude, its increased 
value might amount to full compensation for the portion 
and improvements lost." 

Thus we see that there are two separate majorities aligned 
on two distinct questions that arise in connection with this 
controversy. But as the matter of compensation was not 
directly involved in the case at bar, the opinions on this point 
held by Beatty, Henshaw, Lorigan and Melvin may be re- 
garded as obiter dicta. At any rate, it will require another law- 
suit in which this question of compensation shall be raised 
directly to settle this important branch of the controversy. 

In fine, the decision as it now stands makes no change of any 
grave importance. The right of the State to take tidelands or 



any other lands needed for a public purpose under the doctrine 
of eminent domain has never been disputed, but that right in- 
volves the payment of full compensation to the private owner. 
With the court divided as we have described, the decision gives 
the State no greater rights than it has always had under the 
doctrine of eminent domain. 

On a hasty reading of the majority opinion on the main issue 
it was assumed at first that the property rights of tideland 
owners wherever situated had disappeared, and they must 
pocket the loss. Such lands were those on Islais Creek owned 
by the lumber companies and needed by the State for the ex- 
cavation of an interior harbor. The same category included 
the valuable tidelands at North Beach filled in by private en- 
terprise. It included the whole waterfront of Vallejo where 
the municipality, desiring to create a harbor, is shut off from 
access to tidewater by a private grant. It included the tide- 
lands on the bay shore of the city of Alameda, and a dozen 
other important municipalities fronting on San Francisco Bay. 
But in fact, nothing of all this is settled, and the matter must 
await the determination of another lawsuit. In the meantime, it 
must be remembered that the recent decision is subject to re- 
view on appeal by the United States Supreme Court. 



Political Salvation 
By Machinery. 



The American politician loves a 
panacea, and embraces it eagerly 
with much effusion of word be- 
cause it gives him an easy way to 
exploit his attachment for the rights of the common people. 
Therefore, when Galveston, after its disastrous flood some 
years ago, invented the commission form of government, and 
made it an eminent business success because it was manned 
by the right men, this plan of municipal government was 
eagerly adopted in many of the cities of moderate size in the 
United States. In some cities it worked admirably, and in 
others it was not a whit better than the old way. 

That this plan of government is by no means a cure-all for 
every municipal ill we may infer from the experience of Sacra- 
mento, where the city commission appears to be constantly in 
hot water. Thus the Sacramento Union : 

"It is becoming painfully apparent that the charter of 
the city of Sacramento, which it was thought would bring 
the government of the city closer to the people is in grave 
danger of having just the reverse effect. Unless there 
comes a change in methods, the city is likely to be ruled by 
a star chamber government. Under the old system of 
trustees, the doings of the city government were given much 
publicity. The sessions were held at regular intervals. 
All transactions were in public, and the meetings were usu- 
ally attended by the citizens generally. No one trustee 
had power individually. 

****** 

"The fact that the commission is a small body and that 
each man is supreme in his own department makes it a 
simple matter for any one commissioner or for all the com- 
missioners to conduct the business of the city without pub- 
licity. By means of the executive session and the special 
session the people may be kept in the dark as to the real 
state of their government." 

Commissioner Bliss, who has charge of all police matters, is 
charged with developing "a system of whispered orders to the 
chjef of police who passes along the whisper." Bliss is not as 



January 10, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



Hard Sledding 
For the Author 



wise as he ought to be for that job, and not long ago when he 
threatened to enforce the city ordinance against rag dancing 
impartially in the dance halls and in the exclusive social or- 
ganizations of Sacramento, he was quite successful for the mo- 
ment in imposing his will on the "lower orders," but was met 
with a defiant guffaw from the upper circles of polite society. 

The experience of Sacramento simply goes to show that good 
government is not merely a question of political machinery. 
The human equation must always be reckoned. 

3BT 
The way of the literary gent with 
political aspirations is hard as well 
as thorny. It is the case of the man 
whose enemy had written a book, 
the enemy in this affair being an aspirant for preferment who 
is grilled on the gridiron that himself had forged. Early in 
the game, Walter Page, now ambassador to the Court of St. 
James, escaped the grill because at that time nobody was 
looking, and was confirmed before the gridiron was discov- 
ered. But the other day in the Senate, Senator Bacon declared 
that he had voted to confirm Page while in ignorance of the 
fact that he had written "The Southerner," which, said the 
Senator, "does a gross injustice to the people of the South." 
He added that if he had known about this book and its teach- 
ing he would have seen to it that Page "would never have been 
confirmed." 

Now the grill is being heated for Brand Whitlock, some time 
Mayor of Toledo. Ohio, and the author of well known fiction of 
political and sociological infusion. He has been named for 
Minister to Belgium, and Senator Bacon has had his confirma- 
tion held up until he finds time to take a course of reading in 
Mr. Whitlock's work. Doubtless the process will do the Sena- 
tor much good, and may serve him with instruction as well 
as amusement, but at the same time it may do the candidate 
much harm if he shall find .that his own offspring are used for 
his political undoing. 

Dr. Paul S. Reinsch, Minister to China, underwent a similar 
course of sprouts administered by Senator Shively of Indiana, 
so that it seems that the written word has become a stumbling 
block in the way of political aspiration that makes it hard 
sledding for the ambitious author. 

3B- 

The building contract figures for the 
San Francisco Built past year in San Francisco, corn- 
By Home Capital. piled by William Magee & Sons, 
make an astonishing and gratifying 
report of progress. The official figures for the past nineteen 
years may be regarded as an important contribution to the his- 
tory of San Francisco, and they are as follows : 

1895, $5,639,942; 1896, $5,621,422; 1897, $4,203,900; 1898, 
$3,490,603; 1899, $4;732,748; 1900, $6,390,705; 1901, $7,437,- 
562; 1902, $14,289,938; 1903, $14,984,514; 1904, $16,916,118; 
1905, 20,111,861; 1906, 39,254,467; 1907, 50,499,499; 1908, 
35,128,549; 1909, 30,411.196; 1910, 22,873,942; 1911, $24,495.- 
168; 1912, $26,269,006; 1913, 32,797,259. 

The big fire was naturally followed by two years of tremen- 
dous building activity, and then the figures began to slow down 
to normal, but it should be noted that at no time since 1906 have 
the annual totals fallen as low as they ruled during the period 
before the fire. Yet the period preceding 1906 has always been 
regarded as one of unexampled prosperity in San Francisco. 

The total sum expended on building in San Francisco since 
the fire, including contracts and work otherwise done, is figured 
by Magee & Sons at $301,500,000, and of this enormous total 
only $11,264,000 was borrowed in the East. The balance was 
the investment of home capital. That makes a pretty solid 
showing for San Francisco. 



The Workmen's Compensation law 
Making a Choice has been justly criticised as class 

Of Evils. legislation because it excludes the 

farmers from its provisions, and of 
course this criticism is obviously just. The exemption and dis- 
crimination in favor of a single class was written into the law 
by a man with an eye single fixed on the polls. 

But even now the farmers are not quite sure whether they 
are pleased with this result, and some of them have employed a 
lawyer to explain how they stand in regard to liability to dam- 
ages, for accidents to their employees. So George E. Farrand, 
attorney for the California Fruit Growers' Exchange has pre- 
pared a digest of the laws relating to compensation as they 
affect farm, agricultural and horticultural labor, and with re- 
gard to the exemption above noted he writes : 

"Note particularly, though, that while farm, agricultural, 
viticultural and horticultural labor is excluded from the 
compensation feature of the 1913 act, employers of such 
labor are included within the provisions of the Roseberry 
act, and are liable for accidents to their employees in ac- 
tions at law for damages, with the defenses formerly avail- 
able taken away or curtailed." 

Having escaped the devil, it might seem that the farmers 
have been driven into the deep sea by their blundering political 
friends. The Roseberry law of the 1911 session is a very bind- 
ing instrument. 

W 
Alarming news comes by way of 
Alarming News Oakland from one J. Brunner, who 

From Oakland. is described as a "New York arbiter 

of fashion and one of the foremost 
designers and dress experts in the United States." Mr. Brun- 
ner was recently the guest of certain leading merchants in 
Oakland, and incidentally he gave out the news in the form of 
prophecy like this : 

"Dresses- will not be hobble, although they will still be 
narrow. They will be thin — almost transparent — however, 
for this style has achieved amazing popularity. I have 
found that this is what the women of America want, and 
this is what the big manufacturers will supply. Naughty? 
Oh, no; they won't be naughty! They will be just a little 
less than totally opaque — if you know what that means — 
very charming to the eye and very light to wear. All 
crepes and chiffon, you know. That's what's coming. 
Paris has been producing nothing else, and when it comes 
to that, the women themselves rule. They buy the dresses 
and we must furnish what they demand." 
One observes that the arbiter of fashion is modest even if 
the fashions he prescribes are not. He is modest in the same 
sort that Adam was modest because he lays the blame on the 
woman for these transparencies which may be said to illu- 
minate the procession of the streets. But how does the prophet 
know what the women will do next? The women don't know. 

»■ 

Rural postmasters engaged in hand- 
The Postmaster's Job. ling game birds under the parcels 

post should be qualified for the job 
by a sound legal education to fit them for construction and in- 
terpretation of the laws and regulations in that regard. Here for 
instance is the first halting place : 

"Sec. 477 1 o- Postmaster shall not accept for mailing 
any parcel containing the dead bodies, or parts thereof, 
of any wild animals or birds which have been killed or are 
offered for shipment in violation of the laws of the State, 
territory, or district in which the same were killed or of- 
fered for shipment." 

The postmaster, it will be observed, is required to decide 
off-hand whether the birds have been killed in accordance with 
the game laws of California, which are confused and muddled 
enough to bewilder a sea lawyer. 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 10, 1914. 



THE CANDID FRIEND 

Making a Campaign on Cold Feet-The Case of the Rebellious Rowell— Trained Patriots Malinger- 
ing-Skylarking Breaks Loose Again— An Attorney Among the Ducks- 
Vitality of a Joke 

BY EDWARD F. CAHILL 



Among the prevailing embarrassments of a confused politi- 
cal situation is the perplexity of those whom we have been ac- 
customed to regard as leaders who now, for the moment don't 
seem to know whether they are afoot or a-horseback. It ap- 
pears that in course of the preparation of the State blue book it 
becomes necessary for the instruction and enlightenment of the 
common people to provide all members of the official staff with 
political labels designating their party affiliations. People 
have been hearing a great deal about the birth of a new party 
to which most of our State officialry were expected to profess 
undying allegiance, first, last and all the time. Now that en- 
couraging expectation has been grievously disappointed. Most 
of our officials indeed refuse to be tagged with any sort of brand 
and others profess themselves to be still Republicans, but most 
of them don't know whether it is wise to be off with the old 
love before they are on with the new. Indeed, the only Pro- 
gressives to appear in the forthcoming Blue Book are Governor 
Johnson and his staff, State Controller John S. Chambers, State 
Horticulturist A. J. Cook, State Mineralogist F. McNutt Ham- 
ilton, State Equalizer Mitchell and a few subordinate em- 
ployees. 

8 8f 8 

Roosting on the Fence. 

The Sacramento Union has compiled a list of those officials 
who declare they are comfortably roosting on the fence, to wit : 

"Former Governor George C. Pardee, Francis Cuttle and 
J. P. Baumgartner, members of the conservation commis- 
mission, respond to the secretary's request on a non-parti- 
san basis. They decline to have any political affiliation. 
Employees of the commission, however, are all Progres- 
sives. John Eschleman, Max Thelan, E. Edgarton, H. D. 
Loveland and Alex. Gordon, railroad commissioners, are 
also non-partisan. Eschleman has been prominently men- 
tioned as the next Progressive candidate for Governor, but 
according to the 1913 Blue Book, he has no politics. Like- 
wise case in the non-partisan roll are the recently Progres- 
sively enthused members of the Panama-Pacific Exposi- 
tion Commission. They are Mat. I. Sullivan, Marshall 
Stimson, Arthur Arlett and Chester Rowell. This quartet 
has also failed to fill blank spaces left for filling out politi- 
cal affiliations. Other boards, the members of which ap- 
parently believe a non-partisan government is the ideal to 
which all politicians should work, are board of agriculture, 
board of accountancy, board of architecture." 
S S S 
Webb's Unexpected Constancy. 

No such condition of suspended political animation affects 
Attorney-General Webb or any of his office staff, who perhaps 
unexpectedly proclaim themselves Republicans, at least for 
publication. Likewise, State Treasurer Roberts, Building and 
Loan Commissioner Walker, Bank Superintendent Williams, 
and State Engineer McClure, give their constituents a surprise 
by still calling themselves Republicans for print. 

These gentlemen are quite within their rights, although they 
might be suspected of ingratitude to the author of their politi- 
cal being who has taken the field at the head of an army whose 
officers mostly refuse to follow. The way of the progressor is 
hard. 

Doubtless, the customary explanation will be forthcoming 



that Frank Jordan, regarded as the evil one in State House cir- 
cles, is at his old tricks again. 

"Four and twenty blackbirds baked in a pie; 

When the pie was opened the birds refused to sing. 

Oh, wasn't that a dainty dish to set before a king." 
8- 5 8 
A Traitor in Camp. 

Have we traitors in the camp? Why have these veteran 
slatemakers become so timorous and shrinking on the very 
brink of a momentous campaign? What hit Dr. Pardee that 
makes his heart grow faint ? Come on in, the water's fine ; and 
yet we see Chester Rowell, like September Morn, shivering 
before the plunge. You can't make a campaign on cold feet. 
Indeed, these trained patriots are like to get themselves sus- 
pected in exalted circles if speedily they do not make com- 
plete and abject submission. Now there is Rowell, for exam- 
ple — usually he is the most submissive and well disciplined 
of machine politicians, always ready at the crack of the whip, 
no matter who may hold that instrument of statesmanship for 
the moment. But recently Rowell's symptoms have been 
rather discouraging. Not only does he hesitate to declare him- 
self of the only true faith politically, but he even dares to 
criticise Governor Johnson's trained legislature in a fashion 
showing small consideration for the big noise. Indeed, Rowell 
falls foul of Senator Skylarkins of Visalia, who, the other day, 
went off half-cocked on the proposition that "the farmers are 
all against the workmen's compensation bill, which makes them 
liable the same as men owning large manufacturing and busi- 
ness enterprises." Now, of course, Skylarkins was talking ig- 
norant nonsense, which perhaps is not surprising, and as a mat- 
ter of fact, the legislature did exempt the farmers for political 
reasons. 

8 8 8 

The Case of the Rebellious Susan. 

Now it seems inconsiderate and untimely for Rowell to point 
out the gross injustice of this special privilege and class legis- 
lation enacted by an obedient legislature, as he does in the 
Fresno Republican thus: 

"It just happens that the farmers did succeed in getting 
just this special privilege. Senator Larkins' principle, then, 
that a man who breaks his leg by falling off a roof shall 
be taken care of, but one who breaks his leg by falling off 
a haystack shall take care of himself, is actually the law of 
California, and Senator Larkins and such farmers as really 
hold to the view he attributes to them should be satisfied. 
But it is earnestly to be hoped that the farmers themselves 
will demand of the next legislature that this law be made 
uniform and that they be included in its application. There 
is no excuse of right why the injured employee of a farmer 
shall be turned loose on charity, while the organized re- 
sources of the State would have cared for him if his em- 
ployer were engaged in any other business." 
8 8 8 

Behaving Like a Mob. 

It is a rebellious Chester, and this sort of thing will never 
do. It is time to close up the ranks and present a solid front 
instead of behaving like an undisciplined mob with Pardee and 
Rowell and Matt Sullivan running around in circles. Some of 



January 10, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



the faithful, blundering about in the political dark have got 
themselves together and adopted a set of more or less ringing 
resolutions respectfully demanding that Governor Johnson shall 
run for something — they don't care what, so long as he runs. 
Theirs is an innocent faith in supreme efficacy of parliamen- 
tary procedure to solve all difficulties. With the help of a set of 
resolutions, they can make Hiram Johnson climb a tree or sub- 
due the disobedient Heney. 

S 6- o" 

The Tum-Tum Poets. 

Sam Clover, in the Los Angeles Graphic, laments the lack of 
inspiration in the contemporary poetry of California, but his 
view of the subject appears to be bounded by the summit of 
Tehachapi. He complains justly that the words of the song, 
"I Love You, California," are commonplace, which perhaps 
might be expected of the product of a gent's furnishing store. 
"It is," says Mr. Clover, "the output of a haberdasher, and 
frankly appears to have been written with a yardstick." He 
adds: 

"A second California 'pome' of similar uninspirational 
character, running a close race with the necktie-and-under- 
wear product for sheer mediocrity, has been made public 
which the 700000000000 Booster Club of Southern Cali- 
fornia, in a song-poem contest, awarded first prize and paid 
therefor the sum of $500. We have read the composition 
through twice with no ill effects, but, alas with no thrills. 
It is of the tum-tum, tum-tum, tum-tum, tum-tum variety 
of versification, as the opening stanza — we dare not give 
more, for the $500 award is copyrighted by the 700000000- 
000 Booster Club — indicates. Here it is : 
"In the fertile sunny Southland, 
Where the sky is always blue, 
Mountain sides and rolling valleys, 
Blooming meadows fair to view, 
Shelter homes of happy people, 
In their lives supremely blest — ■ 
Days of sunshine, nights of coolness 
Bring activity, then rest. 
"Then follows the chorus, which assures us that "Once at 
home in California, Quite forgot our earthly ills.' There are 
three more stanzas, equally tum-tumty in their unemotional 
progress. The final quatrain ends thus poetically : 
"Harbors, cities, smooth broad highways — 
Sparkling water brought from hills — 
Life is lived in California 
With intensity that thrills!" 
b" "S 15 

The Los Angeles Product. 

For this sorry stuff the boosters club paid $500 as the best 
of 1,200 manuscripts submitted. I should suppose that it might 
be a fair sample of the Los Angeles poetic output, for Mr. 
Clover prints with apparent approval some verses by a young 
iady contributor which begin : 

"Los Angeles, I give this toast: 
Hail, Queen of the Pacific Coast! 
Hail, Glory of the Golden West! 
Where strangers come on many a quest." 

Lovely rot! "Where strangers come on many a quest." It 
is the poetic way of describing the business of trimming the 
tourist. But any one of our Carmel poets could write better 
stuff with his feet. 

It should be explained that the Los Angeles official com- 
mittee on poetry comprises two bankers, two mayors, the leader 
of a brass band, a real estate agent, sundry merchants, a divine, 
several clubwomen, the business manager of a newspaper and 

tht president of a social club. 

2r ?r X 

An Attorney Among the Ducks. 

Attorney-General Webb's invasion of Bacigalupi's duck pre- 
serve on Tubbs' Island seems to call for the citation in point of 



the famous and classic story of the Devonshire magistrate be- 
fore whom was arraigned a young ne'er do well charged with 
petty larceny. "Prisoner at the bar," began his Honor sol- 
emnly, "you come of a good family; you were brought up in 
refined surroundings, and were given a good education, instead 
of which you go around the country stealing ducks." 

Of course, General Webb demonstrated to the apparent dis- 
satisfaction of Bacigalupi by plentiful citations from the law 
and the Gospel that the wild duck is not property. In the eyes 
of the law the status of a duck is determined by the character 
of the land or water over which he flies. But suppose Baciga- 
lupi had turned loose one of his talking machines on Webb. 
An attorney-general should be fair game for a weapon of that 
sort. 

5 ? ^ 
The Longevity of a Joke. 

The vitality and longevity of a joke has become proverbial, 
and the best of them have a history worth telling. Now I find 
the Sacramento Union printing this news despatch: 

"Washington, Dec. 27. — Frank C. Murray, a rubber 
goods salesman, came to the city to-day and reported the 
discovery of a new kind of fox that lives on a cone-shaped 
mountain about fifty miles southeast of Hinton, W. Va. 
For several generations, he said, these foxes have been in 
the habit of running in one direction around the mountain. 
This has resulted in the legs on one side becoming shorter 
than those of the other. Because of this, the foxes are 
capable of running at a terrific rate of speed. On the 
straight chase, no man or dog has been able to run them 
down. The only way to catch them, Mr. Murray said, is 
to run around in the opposite direction and head them off. 
Then, he explained, they turn, and because of the difference 
in the length of their legs, cannot help but lose their bal- 
ance and tumble head over heels down the mountain. All 
one has to do then, he said, is to run down the mountain 
and pick them up." 

o-o-o- 

Started by Bierce. 

Now, I wonder whether that despatch was sent out by the As- 
sociated Press as news, or was what newspapermen call the 
product of "the grapevine telegraph." The Union appends this 
note : 

"When this story was told in New York fifteen years ago 
it related to razor-back hogs of the Tennessee Mountains." 

The joke is older than that, to my knowledge. It was sent 
on its travels more than twenty years ago by Ambrose Bierce, 
but whether he was the inventor or not I am unable to say. In 
Bierce's version it was the side hill coyote of California that 
afforded this demonstration of the Darwinian theory, and the 
doctrine of evolution. 



TRAD E (tUMIi HI 


\ MARK 


BOORDS 


LONDON. ENG., GINS 


DRY 

OLD TOM 

TWILIGHT 


Charles Meinecke & Co. 


■«m Pacific Comt 31* SACRAMENTO ST., 8. F. 







San Francisco News Letter 



January 10, 1914. 




The backbiting habit is peculiarly characteristic of Cali- 
fornia politicians. The minute a California man is mentioned 
for Federal office in Washington, the wires are loaded at once 
with angry protests. President Cleveland grew so weary of 
this backbiting that he finally refused to listen to any Califor- 
nia complaints, and Wilson is having the same experience. As 
to one of these attacks emanating from California U. S. Senator 
Reed said the other day from his place on the floor: "It is a 
singular thing, and I simply remark it in passing, that about 
every time the character of any man from the West is brought 
in question, somebody rises with a telegram denouncing that 
citizen for all that is bad and wicked and villainous, and at the 
end of the telegram we generally find the euphonious name of 
Francis J. Heney." 

The Federal government proposes to build a highway 

thirty-five miles long to connect Eureka, Humboldt County, 
with the Trinity national forest, and incidentally with Weaver- 
ville, the countyseat of Trinity. That county is now almost the 
most inaccessible part of California, and the proposed road of 
easy grades will bring it in touch with tidewater transporta- 
tion at Eureka. But the road will not be built to-day or to- 
morrow, as the present appropriation is only $50,000, which 
would not build ten miles of first class highway, and besides the 
preliminary surveys are not yet completed. Of .course, there 
will be other appropriations, and any man who can do a sum 
in arithmetic can set up for a prophet as to the completion of 
the road. 

The language used in the Oakland Board of Education 

seems scarcely parliamentary, if one may judge from a report 
of a recent meeting where the chairman, Dr. A. S. Kelly, 
scored School Director Harry Boyle, informing him that "the 
board was tired of his ballyhoo methods and would stand no 
more foolishness," and further telling Boyle that he was "kick- 
ing up a hullabaloo for political campaigning," all of which 
may be explained by the statement in the Tribune that Boyle 
is a candidate for County Clerk. But Boyle does not care, and 
replies defiantly that he is "fighting for the people and will be 
here after the whole bunch of you is gone, fired or otherwise." 
That ought to settle the unpleasantness if anything is ever set- 
tled in politics. 

— : — A war conducted with parliamentary methods is being 
waged in San Mateto County, where the Supervisors have ap- 
pointed a committee to fight the mosquitoes. This cruel war- 
fare will be waged in accordance with the rules of Robert's 
Manual. There will be no captains or colonels or knights in 
arms, but only a chairman, secretary and a treasurer. The 
war is begun by taking up a collection from the bitten so that 
it takes on the aspect of a cross between a religious rite and 
a battle. 

Maurice McLaughlin, of this city, tennis champion of 

the world, discredits the report that the English lawmakers for 
the game propose to put a handicap on his speed by enacting a 
rule that a player, after service, must touch his foot to the 
ground. A rule of that kind, of course, would slow down Mc- 
Laughlin's rush for the net after service. McLaughlin's speed 
in the courts is one of his chief assets, but it seems unsports- 
manlike as well as ridiculous to ask a player to dance tango. 
It isn't playing the game. 



It develops that the new workmen's compensation law 

makes no provision for the men in the employ of the State. Now 
the State is a large employer of labor engaged in pursuits that 
involve no little liability to accidental injury of the sort for 
which the law provides compensation in the case of those in 
private service. There are some 3,000 of such employees on 
the staff or in the service of the State on the San Francisco 
water front, in the State printing house, and engaged in work 
for the Highway Commission. These have been accidentally 
excluded from the benefitof the act, but this is a form of acci- 
dent for which there is no compensation. It is all the more 
annoying because these neglected are of the faithful. 

Edward Berwick, the -sage of Pacific Grove, writes in 

explanation of the aims and purposes of the State administra- 
tion that "to raise the heaviest possible crop of taxes at the 
expense of actual toilers, and from the widest assessment area, 
seems the desired end of these revenue farmers." Has Mr. Ber- 
wick only now discovered that in the creed of the politician, 
government exists only to pay salaries. Berwick wonders be- 
cause "lately the new dean of our college of agriculture calmly 
asked an additional appropriation of half a million dollars that 
he might demonstrate to bona fide farmers how to farm, when 
obviously if he really loved farming, and could make it pay 
him a tithe of the half-million he would be a farmer, not a 
professor." Very true, Dr. Berwick, but we must make some 
allowance for the make-believe of politics. 

Rev. Irl R. Hicks, of St. Louis, is afflicted with a green- 
eyed monster, and claims to be the finder of the sunspots which 
have been making California wet. He insists that Father Ricard 
has been stealing his thunder, and other varieties of weather, 
and he declares that he discovered the climatic influence of 
sunspots forty years ago. So he foreshadows the awful fate 
in store for doubters when he says : "We have lived to see a 
number of public men, who either contemptuously ignored or 
enviously traduced us and our work, go down in censure and 
disgrace, among them many plagiarizing weather prophets." 

Jack London's pursuit of local color in the Snark is 

meeting with gratifying success. Last week he wanted to 
make his handy sloop climb a fence across the Alameda tidal 
canal, and later, while voyaging among the rough seas off 
Richmond, he was knocked out by a sweep of an unruly cross 
arm. An explanatory despatch says that "London is engaged 
in literary work aboard the Snark." Adventures come naturally 
to the adventurous, even on those landlocked seas where 60,000 
commuters daily take their peaceful way. 

W. R. Prather, of East Oakland, visited the Industrial 

Accident Board to take out insurance against personal injury 
for wood choppers in his employ. He was told that the State 
could not insure his men because no statistics were available 
to indicate the casualty rate on that occupation. The State In- 
surance Board would seem to be a lame sort of institution. If 
an employer is liable for damages under the law, the State is 
morally, if not legally, bound to insure him. 

The Secretary of the Oakland Chamber of Commerce 

has advertised for a stenographer who "will sign a pledge not 
to become engaged or marry for one year at least." The Sec- 
retary discovered that he had unconsciously been conducting a 
matrimonial bureau, and had lost three stenographers in rapid 
succession. He is now taking precautions. 

"The Mephisto hat" made its debut at the final session 

of the California Teachers' Association in Oakland. One learns 
that this sinful headgear wears "two little red silk horns very 
sharp and very alluring." It seems unfortunate that the devil 
should have all the best hats as well as the best tunes. 



January 10, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 




PUE>ASUR,E>'S "WAND 

"We obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




PAUL GERSON. 



The Orpheum. 

Horace Goldin is the very last word in 
the magic art. He has taken this much 
abused profession and placed it on its high- 
est plane. He really makes an art of it. He 
brings with him a production which is al- 
most startling. There is a company of fully 
twenty people, and a large amount of scen- 
ery and various kinds of paraphernalia and 
trappings, and even an immense man-eating 
tiger, and a reel of moving pictures, and we 
must not forget the white horse. Goldin be- 
gins his entertainment by giving an exposi- 
tion of magic, which includes many of the 
tricks of the old-time conjurors, several of 
whom he impersonates in make-up and man- 
nerisms. His tricks are done so swiftly, 
and he jumps from one to another with such 
amazing rapidity, that the eye cannot fol- 
low him. He adorns himself in a funny set 
of whiskers and conducts the orchestra in 
a manner to bring out roars of laughter, and 
then he places a young lady assistant on a 
platform with a piano, covers them and fires 
off his pistol, and the whole thing vanishes 
before your eyes. He ends his performance 
with a spectacular pantomimic performance 
which he calls "The Tiger God," and is pre- 
sumed to be a legend or tale of the far East. 
By moving pictures he gives the prologue 
of his story, and at a certain point, it is 
















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Otis Skinner as Hajj. the beggar, in 'Kismet." at the Colum- 
bia Theatre, two weeks beginning Monday. January 12th. 



Scene from "Antony and Cleopatra," the wonderful Kleine 
spectacular production at the Savoy Theatre. 



taken up by the actors on the stage. The whole thing is a reve- 
lation, and its like has never been seen on the stage before. If 
Goldin is responsible for it all, he is a wonder. He is a small, 
portly chap, but he is like lightning in his movements, and he 
certainly makes his people hustle. We are even shown a bal- 
let, and the tiger plays a conspicuous role. As a finale he makes 
the tiger disappear, and enters the cage in its place, and a 
moment later, by some inexplicable process, he has the tiger 
re-appear. It is all very wonderful. Goldin can safely be 
awarded the crown for carrying his profession to the very 
highest possible summit of attainment. It is a performance 
which everybody who attends the Orpheum should not miss. 

The rest of the program is excellent. A young and mighty 
clever lady who carries the euphonious name of Maude Muller, 
carries off many of the honors of the evening. She is a real 
comedienne, and she has a singing voice which is far out of the 
ordinary. Her partner, Ed. Stanley, is capable, also, and be- 
tween them they manage to make the minutes fly all too 
quickly. Miss Muller is a whole show in herself. The Bou- 
dini Brothers are back again, and once more display their fine 
versatility with their piano accordions. They cater to the 
tastes of the people upstairs as well as the high-brows below 
them, by jumping from grand opera to rag-time. Imagine the 
"Overture from William Tell" in the same breath with the latest 
rag effusions ; but these chaps make the transition with perfect 
safety and highly satisfactory results, providing that applause 
be any criterion. Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Allen present them- 
selves in a clever conceit which they call "She Had to Tell 
Him." Allen is a big man, as round and large as they make 
them. Mrs. Allen is a demure looking woman. The little play- 
let sives Allen an opportunity to shoot off some real wit. He is 
unctious and he keeps things moving. There is a tear and a 
laugh commingled, and audiences like this sort of thing. They 
score a success. Tryon's dogs open the show. The canines 
show much cleverness, especially the little fellow who does the 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 10, 1914. 




"Thor, Lord of the Jungles," a feature at the Tivoli next week. 

calculating. If the gentleman in charge would speak, louder he 

would aid matters materially. Lillian Herlein remains a second 

week, and is as statuesque and as handsome as before. The 

five Sullys are also retained another week, and register as big 

a hit as they always do. It is a dandy show, and should not 

be missed. 

* * * 

"The Country Boy" at the Alcazar. 

The Alcazar contingent makes the jump from musical comedy 
to serious drama in a very graceful manner, and does itself 
:redit. I witnessed the play when it was done some time ago at 
the Columbia Theatre, and at that time I gave Edgar Selwyn 
credit for writing a well constructed drama, crowded with heart 
interest and full of exceedingly good situations and climaxes. 
While probabilities are sometimes stretched in order to have 
things work out to the satisfaction of everybody concerned, there 
yet remains a big human and real side to the play. It is the 
kind of play which the average audience loves, the one with the 
smile and the tear closely allied, and in this respect the Alcazar 
audience is always a willing and eager listener. The featured 
role is, of course, in the hands of Bert Lytell. All in all, he is 
better fitted for the role than was the chap who enacted the same 
part with the road company seen here. Lytell is a splendid type 
for a character of this kind. He manages to invest the role with 
all the boyish enthusiasm necessary, and he convinces with 
his evident sincerity and his hope of some day in the not far 
distant future of doing something really big in New York, 
whence he emigrates to seek his fortune, so that he can make a 
name for himself, and come back to the little country town and 
marry the girl who loves him. It is an interesting story wherein 
he goes to the big city and fails lamentably, and it is nothing 
less than a stroke of genius on the part of the author to bring 
his hero back to his little home town, when the aforesaid hero 
is ready to go the way of all things and end his brief career 
by the gas route, and have him find his destiny and his fortune 
there. Besides this, he keeps the love interest in suspense until 
a moment before the final curtain. 

I was more than pleased with the work of Lytell in the lead- 
ing role. This actor has made marked strides since his first ap- 
pearance in this city. He has developed versatility, and there is 
more light and shade in his voice which was formerly inclined 
to a monotone ; in short, he is a much improved actor all along 
the line. Miss Vaughan plays a sympathetic role with much 
discretion and judgment. Next week is to be the last for this 
season of this talented couple, and we are of course sorry to see 
them go. They can always be counted on to give us the very 
best there is in them. They are ever conscientious, and with 
them art is written with a large "A." They are a credit to their 
profession. J. Frank Burke again impresses with a certain capi- 
tal character study. Burke seems in every way fitted to fill the 
shoes of Bennison. Edmond Lowe has a role of limited oppor- 
tunities which he plays with his customary cleverness. Josie 
Seabrooks is somewhat weak as the mother of the country boy. 



In her effort to be simple and effective in her work she loses out. 
Wesner has the fine part of Merkle, the newspaper man, and 
does the role in a manner which leaves little to be desired. An 
addition to the company in the person of Mona Morgan is as- 
signed the character of the darkey servant, and she gives 
evidence of real ability. Louise Brownell is very good as the 
boarding house pest, and Ralph Bell is satisfactory in a small 
part. Jerome Storm is very good as Weinstein, and secures all 
the laughs which the fat lines of the part afford. Frances Car- 
son strives valiantly in the role of the Broadway chorus girl. 
She is not the type for the part. Miss Carson is a real ingenue, 
dainty and petite, and the part demands a different type. Ker- 
nan Cripps has little to do, but does this little well. As a whole, 
it is an excellent performance which big audiences are thor- 
oughly enjoying. Do not miss Miss Vaughan and Lytell in 
their final week, when they are to do "Madame X," in which 
Miss Vaughan has but recently scored a tremendous success. 



Recertly established in this city is a little and snug place 

of business known as "Ye Gift and Favour Shop." It will be 
found in the Hastings Building, 162 Post street, and is con- 
ducted by two enterprising women who make it their specialty 
to offer to all who love beautiful things and articles of original 
design a full and satisfying selection. The shop offers not only 
its own workmanship, but also that of many women whose skill 
and sense of art impels them to work out designs of special ori- 
ginality, and who are given an opportunity to sell their goods 
at this shop. A specialty is made of fitting up milady's bureau 
with useful boxes and trays made of Cretonne to match the 
hangings of the room, or of Chinese brocade with embroidery. 
For the suit case they furnish dressing gowns, caps and slip- 
pers and other novelties for use in traveling. Besides, there 
are hand-painted China, needlework, occasion cards, lamp 
shades, prizes for card parties and Chinese applied art and 
Jewelry. The shop is conducted by Mrs. M. Reed and Miss J. 
K. Fischer. 



OUR MID-WINTER SALE 

NOW IN PROGRESS 

A sweeping and unreserved clearance of fine 
Suits, Dresses and Coats. Everyone positively 
of the value we claim for it, and most unusual 
bargains. 

SUITS 



Suits that formerly sold up to $18.75, now 
Suits that formerly sold up to $25.00, now 
Suits that formerly sold up to $35.00, now 
Suits that formerly sold up to $40.00, now 
Suits that formerly sold up to $50.00, now 
Suits that formerly sold up to $60.00, now 
Suits that formerly sold up to $75.00, now 



COATS 



Coats 
Coats 
Coats 
Coats 
Coats 
Coats 
Coats 



that 
that 
that 
that 
that 
that 
that 



formerly sold up to $15, now 
formerly sold up to $20, now 
formerly sold up to $25, now 
formerly sold up to $30, now 
formerly sold up to $35, now 
formerly sold up to $40, now 
formerly sold up to $55, now 



DRESSES 



Dresses worth up to $12.50, now - 

Dresses worth up to $15.00, now - 

Dresses worth up to $18.75, now • 

Dresses worth up to $25.00, now • 

Dresses worth up to $35.00, now - 

Dresses worth up to $40.00, now - 

All Evening Gowns worth from $50 up at Y 2 price 



$ 6 
$ 9 
$12 
$15 
$18 
$21 
$24 



$ 5 
$ 8 
$11 
$14 
$17 
$20 
$23 



$ 3 

$ 5 
$ 7 
$ 9 
$13 
$19 




974 MARKET ST. Bet. Mason and Taylor 



January 10, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



11 



A W1FES BELIEF IN HER HUSBAND. 

Ida M. Tarbell publishes in the January American Magazine 
a thrilling description of the work of the Court of Domestic Re- 
lations in Chicago — a court which settles disputes between hus- 
bands and wives. Following is a story of a wife-beating case 
that Miss Tarbell saw settled : 

"In a touching case a woman of fifty, gentle, hard-working and 
respectable, had served a warrant on her husband for beating 
her. They had no children; he never drank. He worked regu- 
larly, and regularly 'beat her up.' 'She wasn't strong as she 
used to be,' she said apologetically, and 'she couldn't stand it.' 
The judge looked at the big, bent, surly faced fellow, and broke 
out in wrath. 'You've got to go to the Bridewell ; that's the place 
for you; a man who will beat a woman like that!— all worn out 
and a good wife, anybody can see that. You'll go to the Bride- 
well for a year.' 

"The man looked up in real alarm — 'But what will she do, 
Judge ? We ain't got much ahead. She ain't got anybody but 
me. How'll she Hve?' His concern for her was perfectly sin- 
cere. 'She's nobody but you, and you beat her,' exploded the 
judge. The man seemed like one wakened from a stupor. 'I'll 
never do it again, on my honor I won't. I didn't know she was 
sick; I didn't realize. Things got so hard — nothing but slave, 
and I just got into the habit, guess I took it out on her. I'll 
never strike her again in this world.' 

"The woman behind him, with the tears streaming down her 
face, said : 'He won't Judge. Don't send him away. He won't 
beat me if he says he won't. He has had it hard.' 

"Well, they went off happy, and I, for one, do not doubt his 
keeping his word." 



FOREST NOTES. 



The forest service collected 40,000 pounds of tree seed last 
year for use in reforestation work. The total area reforested 
was about 30,000 acres. 

There is promise of a large turpentine industry in the West 
and Southwest, the raw product being supplied by the resinous 
gum of western yellow pine. 

German pencil manufacturers are looking to California in- 
cense cedar for pencil wood. The establishment of a pencil fac- 
tory in California is not improbable. 

More than 120 million board feet of timber was given away 
free by the government last year to settlers and miners living in 
or near the national forests. 

There are 16 maples in the United States, most of them being 
Eastern species. The most valuable, not only because of the 
product of its sap, but also of the lumber, is sugar maple. 

It has been demonstrated that over-grazed stock ranges on the 
national forests can be brought back to use under a system of 
regulated grazing faster than if they are left unused. 



DR. GLASER ON THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Governor Johnson's appointment of Dr. Edward F. Glaser to 
be a member of the State Board of Health is admirable. Dr. 
Glaser's scientific attainments and special knewledge will make 
him a useful member of the board. He is a most conscientious 
man, and fitted in every way by experience, training and mental 
equipment to serve the public in the field of sanitation. Dr. 
Glaser has a large practice in San Francisco as an eye, ear and 
throat specialist, and has innumerable friends. 



G. H. Umbsen & Co. have arranged an auction sale of a 

number of choice properties for Monday. January 19th, at their 
salesroom on Montgomery street. Among the selected lots are 
two by order of the Superior Court. Referee's sale of a choice 
business lot, 50x122:6 east line of Mission between 17th and 
18th, and 80x243 on Precita avenue, near Folsom, which is a 
good opportunity for builders. The sale is at a very opportune 
time for investors. 



Some one has recently pointed out that Rabindranath Ta- 

gore is not the only Nobel prize winner who has a new book out 
this fall. It will be remembered that a few years ago Theodore 
Roosevelt won the Nobel prize, not for literature, to be sure, 
but for services equally important to the good of mankind in 
general. 



A SECRET. 

My laddie's a' the world to me! 

Tis to himself I owe it 
That I can never more gae free, 

But, ah! he must not know it! 

When from my side he roams awa', 

I scarce believe I'm living; 
But when he's here— my laddie!— ah, 

I die for want of giving! 

Why must I think upon his smile? 
_ His eyes o'erbright and bonny? 
His gladness that doth sae beguile 
It robs my heart of ony? 

Were I a lad, and he a maid, 

I would not be sae winning; 
To wound too deep I'd be afraid, 
And deem such sweetness sinning. 
— Florence Earle Coates in Harper's Magazine. 



a 



Golden State 
Limited" 



Lv. Los Angeles 11:45 A. M. 

Ar. Chicago 10:15 A. M. 

(Third Morning) 

Electric Lighted Equipment. 
Observation-Clubroom Car, Ladies' Parlor and Library, 
Drawing-Roomt, Compartments, Stock and News Re- 
ports, Barber Shop, Valet Service, Victrola, Dining Car 

Through Pullman Sleeping-Car Connections From 
San Francisco. Leave Ferry Station 5:00 P. M. 

FIRST CLASS TICKETS ONLY 

"THE CALIFORNIAN" 

Electric Lighted. Standard Pullman 

Tourist and Reclining Chair Cart. 

Dining Car. 

Leave Los Angeles 3:00 P. M. 

Pullman Sleeping Car Connections from San Francisco 

Also Through Tourist Sleeping Car Daily, 

Leaving Ferry Station 10:40 A. M. 

ALL CLASSES OF TICKETS 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

THE EXPOSITION LINE— 1915. 

BAN FRANCISCO: Flood Building. Palace Hotel, Fern Station, Phone Kearny 
8160. Third and Townsei Bitten, Phone Kearny ISO. 

OAKLAND: Thirteenth Street and*Broadway, Phone Oakland 162. Sixteenth 
Stri ■ one Lakeside 1420. Firsl Street station, i 

Oaklai 

EL PASO & SOUTHWESTERN 

san FRANCISCO: SOOMonadnock Building Phone Kearny G26 

ROCK ISLAND LINES 

san FRANCISCO: 691 Market Street Phone Butter 817 



ANNUAL KNIT SALE 

NOW IN PROGRESS 

TREMENDOUS REDUCTIONS IN 

SWEATER COATS ANGORA AND LLAMA COATS 

UNDERWEAR HOSIERY 

BATH ROBES 



%zAcM>f® 




GRANT AVE. 
AT POST ST. 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 10, 1914. 




0", 



0CffiTX 



&£m 




Now comes the genuine surprise package in the affairs of 
the household of young Jack Spreckels and his dashing wife. 
Some weeks ago they announced their intention of applying to 
the divorce courts for the solution of their domestic troubles. 
Followed all the usual gossip that trails in the wake of such 
announcements. The most energetic prophets immediately be- 
gan to polish up other wedding bells, and to sketch in futurist 
style a picture of the divorced wife marrying the brother of the 
young woman the divorced husband weds in post-impressionis- 
tic manner. All of which makes even a cubist picture look like 
a simple explosion in matrimony compared to this tangle. 

There is no need for understanding it now. For the Jack 
Spreckels are not going to be divorced ! The other night Jack 
was a guest at a stag dinner given by his uncle, Adolph 
Spreckels, and one of the other guests, who is a lifelong fam- 
ily friend, commented sadly on the shadow on the home which 
had promised so much sunshine! "Cheer up," said Jack, "we 
have decided not to get divorced, and Edith and I are planning 
a little trip over to Europe." Mrs. Jack has likewise confided 
to friends that the divorce suit has been withdrawn and one does 
not have to be an ornithologist to recognize that a bird that looks 
very much like the white dove of peace is very busy building 
a nest on their roof top. They are both devotedly attached to 
their handsome children, and that is given as the chief fac- 
tor in the reconciliation. 

For the last two years insistent rumor has protested that the 
Jack Spreckels household was trembling on the brink of dis- 
ruption, but not until two or three months ago was this rumor 
confirmed. Mrs. Spreckels, in characteristic fashion, confided 
to a friend at a dansant at the St. Francis that she was going 
to divorce Jack, and "friend-husband, when interviewed on the 
subject gallantly protested that whatever Mrs. Spreckels said 
must remain undisputed by him. Then followed the filing of 
divorce papers, and rustling on the edge of these papers the 
rumor that the settlement of property rights was not going to 
be accomplished without a great deal of bitterness and public 
airing of their troubles. Those who love to see the byways of 
the smart set lighted by this kind of scandalabria, strained 
their eyes for the shadows cast before to take the definite shape 
of scandal. They need no longer stand on guard to catch the 
first glimpse, for the divorce papers have been withdrawn, and 
the Jack Spreckels home, while it may show a few weather- 
beaten signs of the storm that it has been through, looks fairly 
seaworthy for fair-going weather. 

© © © 

The marriage of Eliza McMullin and John Gallois on Wed- 
nesday night was a very quiet affair, and was celebrated with- 
out any member of the groom's immediate family being present. 
This, in spite of the fact that his sister, Mrs. Horace Hill, Jr., 
and her husband, left their home in New York City in time to 
be present at the ceremony. But at Omaha, Mrs. Hill was taken 
off the Overland train in order that the serious illness which she 
developed on the way out might be cared for by physicians. 
Mrs. Eugene Gallois, her mother, left immediately in order to 
b.e at her bedside, and reassuring telegrams from her counseled 
that no change be made in the wedding plans, so the ceremony 
was not postponed, although it was a great disappointment to 
the groom not to have his mother and only sister present at the 
wedding. The elder Gallois was, during his lifetime, one of 
the large owners in the White House, and a dominant figure in 
its affairs, and the love and esteem in which he was held has 
been strongly manifested by the employees there who still 
speak of him as "Gallois the Just," investing him with all the 
dignity of one of the great rulers of the earth. The son is asso- 
ciated in the same business. The bride is a daughter of Mrs. 
Joseph H. Norris of Piedmont. After a brief wedding trip 
abroad, they will make' their home down the peninsula, having 
taken a house near Woodside for the summer. 

Mrs. Horace Hill, Jr., has made her home in New York since 



her marriage last year. As Jean Gallois she was a great belle 
and intimate friend of Florence Hopkins, who married Cheever 
Cowdin, and Mary Keeney, who is now Mrs. Talbot Walker. 
Her marriage to young Hill was not consummated until a great 
many difficulties were smoothed over, owing to differences be- 
tween the families of the elders. However, the young people 
announced that they were not concerned in them, and would 
get married if need be without the consent of any one. How- 
ever, they were not obliged to carry out this plan, and both fami- 
lies are now delighted with the match. The greatest sympathy 
is felt for Mrs. Hill, and the wires are kept hot with messages 
to her husband and mother, who wire that all danger is now 
over. 

© © © 
Some idea of the affection in which Kathleen de Young is 
held by all her friends may be glimpsed from the engagement 
presents which have been showered upon her. The de Youngs 
have friends all over the world, and a marriage in this house- 
hold brings rich and varied presents from the wide world over. 
But the most conclusive testimony of the regard in which Kath- 
leen is held by her girl friends is the wonderful array of dainty 
handwork, full of love stitches, which accompanied the con- 
gratulations of her intimates. It had been surmised for some 
time that Ferdinand Theriot would be the favored of her suitors, 
so those who were on "the inside" were all prepared with their 
offering. The wedding will be a very quiet affair, witnessed by 
the members of both families, which on the groom's side is nar- 
rowed down to the De Sablas. He is a nephew of Mr. De Sabla 
and associated with him in business. The wedding will take 
place during the last week in January, and the young couple 
have decided against an extended wedding journey, preferring 
to settle soon in the charming house which they have leased in 
Pacific avenue, near the Presidio gate. The de Youngs have 
two elaborate country homes, one near San Rafael, and the 
other down the peninsula, and as the loss of the only son of the 
household has left a great hole in the united family of this un- 
usually devoted clan, the young couple have promised to spend 
the time they can give to out-of-towning in the family home. 
So, unlike most young couples of to-day, they are to start life 
in a town house instead of first setting up their household goods 
in the country. Kathleen is by many considered the beauty 
of the de Young family, and in her wedding robes will make a 
very handsome bride. She is a talented musician, and since 



Style Is Illusive But 
Essential 

Probably style is so difficult to acquire just 
because it is so hard to identify. 

' If you took one of our coats and held it side 
by side with an inferior the differences could not 
easily be tabulated, yet in one a man would 
look distinguished and in the other common-place. 

Style is what determines the appearance of 
a man — it's the difference in clothes. The fabric 
of two suits may be identical, the tailoring as 
good and yet totally dissimilar because style is 
controlling in appearance. 

We offer you perfect clothing — perfect in 
style, fit, fabric and tailoring at no advance in 
cost. Good suits $ 1 7.50 — magnificent suits $25 

The ^HPob 

Chas.Keilus &Co.(ino 

726- MARKET STREET 



January 10, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



the family has been in mourning, has spent a great deal of time 
at the piano, and those who have heard her, maintain that she 
is playing with all the brilliance of a professional. 
© © 9 

This week the youngest set tripped blithely into the fad of 
the moment, and acquired in passing all the thrill of doing just 
what the grown-ups have been enjoying with a few little im- 
provements suggested by their youth and tastes. On Friday, 
from 4 until 9, the Century Club resounded to the glides and 
dips of a dansant, hostessed by Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels, Mrs. 
Horace Pillsbury, and Mrs. Alexander Lilly, and enjoyed by 
about eighty youngsters ranging in ages from twelve to six- 
teen. The dansant differed from the oldsters' affairs in several 
ways. Ssh! It must be admitted that the general average of 
dancing is higher. Our only consolation is that by the time 
these kiddies are getting a bit stiff something new will come 
along and baffle their joints ! Instead of lasting from 4 until 7 
like the dansants for the grown-ups, the hours were prolonged 
until nine, and the refreshments did not include tea, with or 
without a stick, and the usual accompaniment of sandwiches and 
cakes at the regular dansants. Instead, there were all the good- 
ies that would make a wholesome supper for youngsters, with 
hot chocolate the favorite beverage. Although the hours were 
supposed to be from four until nine, and the hostesses tried to 
be severe about it, not even a hard-hearted ogre could have 
broken up the party at that hour, and so it was nearer ten when 
the last couple was literally dragged off the floor by a deter- 
mined parent. Many of the fathers as well as the mothers of 
the young dancers dropped in for a few minutes to see their 
young hopefuls gracefully execute the new dances in which 
they have become so expert after the manner of youth. 
© © © 

Other than dancing parties, the week was unilluminated by 
social activities of any sort. However, every night had its 
gala dance, culminating with the Greenway at the Fairmont on 
Friday. Until supper time the floor showed very few couples 
swinging to the rythmic new dances, but a great many came in 
time for supper and the dancing continued until the morning. 
This is the third dance of the series which has proven as popular 
this year as in the yesteryears. 

The immediate future is set to dance music like the immediate 
past. One of the pleasantest affairs in prospect is the ball 
which will be jointly hostessed by Mrs. Eugene Murphy, Mrs. 
Fred McNear, Mrs. Walter Martin and Mrs. Gus Taylor. 



The name "Techau Tavern" stands, without qualifica- 
tion, for all that is best in the art of catering to the taste of con- 
noisseurs. Not only is the menu always excellent and the ser- 
vice superior, but in many other ways less intimately connected 
with the purveying of food, the management shows its thought- 
fulness for the satisfaction of its patrons. The music is of the 
highest class to be heard in any cafe, and the various souvenirs 
which are presented to lady patrons on Saturday afternoons are 
the most attractive obtainable. High in favor among these 
souvenirs are the toilet preparations of the Aubrey Sisters, one 
of which will be presented next Saturday. 

( Advert feculent) 



One of Breuer's big canvases can be framed by E. B. 

Courvoisier as expeditiously and as satisfactorily as a little 
Copley print, or a monotype by Xavier Martinez. A wide and 
exclusive collection of framing materials. 431 Sutter street. 



(Advertisement) 



Mater sm<& ©®sagm®r ®ff IMraskna IFiroe&s 


fa[5)@irftB<a] Medtels ®ira fM§jp>ky 


Scottish Rite Temple, Van Ness and Sutter 


Just Opened Telephone Prospect 9073 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

Union Square 

A delightful contribution to the charm of life in 
cosmopolitan San Francisco. 

M. MAURICE AND FLORENCE WALTON, 

The world's greatest rhythmic dancers 

In the Rose Room, Herter's sensuously beautiful 
decorative achievement, during supper, commenc- 
ing January twelfth. 

Under the Management of James Woods 



HAVE YOU DINED IN THE 

PALM COURT 

PALACE HOTEL ? 
Most Beautiful Dining Room in the World 



Fairmont Hotel under 

the same management 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



HOTEL OAKLAND Si 

460 Rooms with Outside Exposure (No Court Rooms) 
RATES: Rooms, detached bath $1.50 per day and up 
Rooms, private bath $2.00 per day and up 
EUROPEAN PLAN 

Advantageous Rates to Permanent Guests 

Noted for Cuisine and Service Restaurant Prices Moderate 

Home Atmosphere and Genuine Hospitality 

VICTOR REITER, Manager 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

125 miles south from San Francisco. 
Finest all grass Golf Course in Califor- 
nia. Daily rates, $5, $6, $7 per day. 
Special monthly rates. 

PACIFIC GROVE HOTEL 

Three miles by trolley from DEL 
MONTE, under same management. 
Daily rates $2.50 to $4 per day. 
Special monthly rates. 



Above hotels are under the management of 

H. R. WARNER, Del Monte, California 




FIRST ANNUAL SALE 

DURING JANUARY 

A special discount on all curios and present 
stock of 

APPLIED ART WORK 

MISS CLAYES 



401-404 Liebes Building, 177 Post St., near Grant Avenue 



Mrs. Marie Read 



Miss Josephine K. Fischer 



" \fo (Sift artu iFaumir §>boji" 

Applied Art Needle Work Hand Painted China 

Occasion Cards, Card Prizes and other 
Artistic Novelties 
I HASTINGS BUILDING. Phone IVmglas - 

ST STREET AT GRANT AVE.. S. F.. CAL. 



14 

m 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 10, 1914. 




Announcements suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear In the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 
ALTMAN-GETZ. — The engagement of Miss Reta Altman and Barry Getz 

was announced last week by Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Altman. 
BINE-CERF. — Dr. Remi Bine announces the engagement of his sister. 

Marie, to Mr. Lucien Cerf, and will be at home to her friends Sunday 

afternoon, January 11, 1914. 
CLARKE-CHANDLER. — One of the romances of the Berkeley campus 

made known during the past week was that of the engagement of 

Miss Belle Clarke and Asa Crawford Chandler. 
FITZPATRICK-LASKY.— The engagement of Miss Alice Fltzpatriek and 

Albert Lasky of this city, formerly of Manitoba. Canada, was made 

known last veek, The marriage will take place in February. 
GAINER-WISNOM. — The engagement is announced of Miss Claire Gainer, 

formerly of San Mateo, but now of San Francisco, to Samuel A. "Wis- 

nom, son o Robert WIsnom, the capitalist. 
HAXXIGAN-HOOPER.— Miss Josephine Hannigan surprised her friends 

recently by announcing her engagement to Arthur Hooper, with the 

further intimation that the wedding would be early in the spring. 
LEMCKE-HALL. — One of the most interesting announcements of the 

holiday season was that of the engagement of Miss Emma Lemcke to 

Chaffee Hall last Saturday afternoon. 
WACHTER-MOULTON.— Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Wachter announce the 

engagement of their daughter. Florence, to Robert Harrison Moulton, 

of Riverside. 
WEAVER-DOXN ELEY. — Mrs. T. Weaver announced on December 25th 

the engagement of her daughter. May, to John Donneley of this city. 

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

DE YOUNG-THERIOT. — The marriage of Miss Kathleen de Young and 
Mr. Ferdinand Theriot will take place on January 28th at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. M. H. de Young in California street. Archbishop Patrick 
W. Riordan will officiate. Miss Phyllis de Young will be her sister's 
only attendant. 

MURRAY-PRATT. — Miss Sadie Murray and Lieutenant Conger Pratt will 
be married on February 11th. 

SONNTAG-MURRAY.— Miss Ila Sonntag and Mr. Hamilton Murray will 
be married on February 17th. 

WEDDINGS. 

CHAMBERLIN-"vVILLL\MS.— Miss S. Belle Chamberlin of Boise, Idaho, 
and Mr. Wilber F. Williams of Boseman, Mont., were married on 
the last day of the old year. 

CUNNINGHAM-ROE, — A wedding of much interest in the local smart set 
and in service circles took place in New York Wednesday, when Miss 
Ada Cunningham became the wife of George Robinson Roe. 

ELLIOTT-BERINGER.— Miss Laura M. Elliott of Mill Valley and Pierre 
N. Beringer of San Francisco, were married New Year's Eve at the 
Unitarian Church by the Rev. S. S. Button. 

GRANT-PENNYBACKER.— News was received recently of the marriage 
of Chapman Grant and Miss Lillian Pennybacker, the ceremony hav- 
ing taken place in July. 

HILL-WEST. — Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gordon West have gone south on their 
honeymoon, and upon their return will take apartments in the Lake- 
side district until later in the year. 

McMULLIN-GALLOIS.— On Wednesday last, Miss Eliza McMullin and 
Mr. John Gallois were married at the home of the bride's mother, Mrs. 
Joseph Norris. in Piedmont. 

ROUDA-FEDER.— The wedding of Miss Josephine Rouda, daughter of 
Samuel Rouda of this city, and Nathan Feder of Los Angeles, was sol- 
emnized Saturday at 6 o'clock at the Fairmont, Dr. Jacob Nleto 
officiating. 

STEIXBEY'ER-CROSS.— Miss Kate Steinbeyer of New York and Reuben 
Cross of this city were married Thursday last by Dr. Levy. 

STRINGHAM-DE WITT.— On Tuesday, Miss Harriet Strlngham and the 
Rev. William de Witt were married in Berkeley. 

SWOFFORD-LAWES.— Miss Mary Swofford, of Chehalis. Wash., and Mr. 
Claude Douglas Lawes of England were married New Year's morning 
at St. Mary's Cathedral. Father Calhoun officiated. 

WRIGHT-KIMBALL.— On January 1, Miss Frances Wright and Mr. 
Sherman Kimball were married at the bride's home in Ohio. 

DANCES. 

BEAVER. — Miss Isabelle Beaver has issued invitations to a dinner dance 
which she will give at the inylesiuo Club Tuesday evening, January 
13th, in honor of Miss Amy Morrison, the attractive niece of Mrs. 
Stanley Stillman. 

CALIFORNIA. — The officers of the cruiser California, which is now in the 
harbor, have issued invitations for a tea dance to be given this 
Saturday afternoon aboard ship between the hours of 4:30 and 7 
o'clock, over sixty guests having been invited. 

CHANDLER.— Mis? Virginia H. Chandler and Mr. Robert E. Chandler 
gave a very enjoyable rag dance on Friday evening of last week. 

DETRICK. — Mrs. Bowie Derrick's Assembly on Saturday night was ex- 
ceptionally successful. It was gotten up by Bob Martin. The next 
Assembly will be on January 10th, and the February dance is to be a 
Pierrot and Pierette party. 



GRANT. — Mrs. J. D. Grant and Mrs. Mountford S.^Wilson gave a most 

enjoyable dance Monday evening of last week in Burlingame In honor 

of the young people home from schools and colleges. 
JAGER. — A very pleasant evening was spent at the home of Mr. E. Jager 

on Saturday. December 27th, in honor of his twenty-first birthday. 

The evening was spent in dancing. 
PYRAMIDS. — The Pyramids, an organization comprised of members of the 

Humboldt Evening High School, will hold their initial dance in 

January. 
RADEMACHER.— A rag party was given by Messrs. Val and Edgar Rade- 

macher at their home New Year's eve. 
SHINKEL.— The Misses Elza and Alice Shinkel will be hostesses at a 

dance at their home this evening, entertaining their young friends 

from Miss Hamlin's School. 
ST. FRANCIS. — Cards have been issued for two dances to be given at 

the Hotc-tl St. Francis the first on January 21st and the second on 

February ISth. 

DANSANT. 

GLASS. — Mr. and Mrs. Frank Glass and Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Nahl have 
Issued invitations to a cabaret dansant which they will give Friday 
■ evening, January 23d, at the Town and Gown Club, in Berkeley. 

PETERS.— Miss Anne Peters has invited a number of friends to attend 
the theatre next Monday evening, and later be her guests at the 
dansant at the Hotel St. Francis. The affair will be in honor of Miss 
Sadie Murray. 

PIXLEY.— Mrs. Frank PIxley had one of the largest and certainly one 
of the most attractive tables at the dansant at the Palace on Saturday 
afternoon, having twenty young buds of the school set and some of 
the boys of the same age. 

SPROULE.— Mr. and Mrs. William Sproule gave a dinner dance on last 
Tuesday evening for the latter's daughter, Miss Marie Louise Bald- 
win, who has come out from New York to spend the holidays at home. 

SPRECKELS.— Mr. and Mrs. Adolph B. Spreckels gave a dinner dance 
on Monday night to' over a score of their friends, the affair being a 
jolly fancy dress entertainment. 

ST. FRANCIS. — The dansant at the St. Francis on Monday a week ago 
was a gala occasion for the younger set, as many of the girls and 
boys home from school enjoyed their first dansant at a fashionable 
public place at this assembly. 

LUNCHEONS. 

BOS. — Mrs. George Bos will entertain Wednesday afternoon at a bridge 
luncheon given at the Bellevue Hotel, where Mrs. Bos resides. 

DEERING. — Mrs. Harry Lombard, society woman of Los Angeles, who is 
sojouprning at the St. Francis, will be the motif for a luncheon that 
will be given by Mrs. Charles Deering at the latter's home. 

FORD. — Mr. and Mrs. Barnard Ford entertained a number of friends last 
Sunday at a luncheon at their new home in Burlingame in honor of 
Mrs. Ford's sister. Miss Leslie Miller. 

LIVINGSTON. — Miss Belle Phyllis Livingston entertained at luncheon at 
the Fairmont on Saturday last, afterwards attending trie dansant at 
the Palace with her guests. 

DINNERS. 

ANDERSON. —Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Anderson will give a dinner pre- 
ceding the Cinderella dance which will be given at the Falrmonl on 
January 30th. 

BOLTRN. — Mr. and Mrs. Bowers Bourn gave a dinner Tuesday evening of 
last week in honor of Miss Helen Crocker. 

BRICE. — Mrs. .1. J. Brice and her daughter. Miss Elizabeth Brice, will give 
a dinner on January 30th In the south-side laurel court of the Fairmont 
preceding the Cinderella dance, 

HAXiSEY. — Mrs. Emma E. Halsey and her son, T. V. Halsey, entertained 
at dinner last Thursday evening in the private dining room at the 
Hotel Cecil. 

JOHNSON.— Mr, and Mrs. Y>. W. W. Johnson, of La Playa, Carmel-by-the- 
Sea, entertained recently at a dinner, followed by a dance. This is 
their second affair this season. 



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January 10, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



IS 



PIKE.— Mr. and Mrs. Roy M. Pike gave a dinner recently at their home 
in Pacific avenue In honor of Mr, and Mrs. G 
New York for a brief visit. 
REES. Colon. ,,i a dinner dance New Year's 

and Mrs. Hampton, who left this 

week for the Philippines. 

Thomas. Mi. and Mis. William Thomas will entertain at a dinner in the 
alrmont on Friday evening, prior to the Green - 

' 3. II. Williams were dinner hosts Mon- 
eek at their quarters at Fort Scott in compliment 
to Colonel and Mis. Richmond Pearson Davis. 
WORDEN.- Among those who will entertain at dinner parties on Friday 
evening prior to the Greenwaj are Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Worden. who 
will give a dinner with the gold service in the gray room at the Fair- 
mont for forty guests. 

DEBUT. 
SCOTT. — Mrs. J. Walter Scott formally presented her daughter, Miss 
Adele Scott, to society last Wednesday week. The coming out party 
was given at the Scott home in East Oakland. 

HOUSE PARTIES. 
PHELAN. — Mr. James D. Phelan entertained a number of friends at a 

house party last week at his home near Los Gatos. 
WRIGHT. — Mr. and Mrs. George T. Wright entertained a house party 

over the new year at their bungalow at Brookdale, near Los Gatos. 

BOX PARTIES. 

SISSON. — Miss Madeleine Sisson was hostess at a box party given in 
honor of two brides-elect, Miss Flora Ziegler and Miss Rita Maundell, 
last Thursday week. 

ENTERTAINING. 

ABBOTT. — Mr. and Mrs. William Martin Abbott will entertain during the 
month for their son Lindley. The Misses Jean Pollock, Dorothy Deane, 
Katie-bel McGregor and Marie Louise Black will assist in receiving. 
AT THE HOTELS. 

DKL MONTE. — Mrs. Plunkett and her father, Mr. H. Abbott, of Vancou- 
ver, are again at Del Monte for the winter. Their many friends wel- 
comed their return last Wednesday. Their home is now in Vancouver, 
although Mrs. Plunkett has a home in London, where she stayed this 
summer. — The New Year's Golf Tournament at Del Monte turned out 
to be a great success, notwithstanding the forbidding weather of the 
last few days of the old year, for New Year's day was bright and sun- 
shiny. Mr. Tisdale was the winner of the Men's first division, and 
Miss Alice Warner in the ladies'. 

PACIFIC GROVE.— A. W. Hall, of Jonesboro. Arkansas, with his bride, 
stopped off on their honeymoon trip, which is to include the Hawaiian 
Islands. — Mr. A. Sullivan, of Sitka, Alaska, a special operator of the 
Government Secret Service, is stopping at the hotel while visiting 
friends in the city. He is off on a six months' leave, while trying to 
recover from a siege of rheumatism acquired in the North, and hopes 
the healthy conditions of California will put him back to the good. 

ARRIVALS. 

CAROLAN. — Mr. and M is. Francis Carol an returned to town yesterday 

after having spent the week end at Burlingame Country Club. 
KOSHLAND.— Mr. and Mrs. Max I. Rush land, who were married in 

Bakersfield Sunday, arrived at the Palace Hotel M lay, where they 

will make their home, 

LINDl :LOM.— Miss Bvtta Llndblom returned recently from New York. 
where she has been attending the Clamrosch Institute. 

Si l REVE, — Mr. and Mis. George Rodman Shreve and their three pretty 
daughters, i he Misses Rebecca, Elizabeth and Agnes Shreve, returned 
Wednesday to San Mateo, where they win take possession of then- 
home. 

si 'RECK I'M .s. Aii. and Mrs.Rudolph Spreckels and their children have 
returned from Hotel i 'el Monte, where the; hai been spending the 
past week. 

WEBSTER, Mr, and Mrs, Walter I ■ Webster, who hi 
in Bui ope For > : --\ ei ml ha, returned here I his ■ 

DEPARTURES. 
ANDREWS. Mrs. C. F. Andrews, wit", of Captain Andrews, left M 

for the Philippines. 

\u.\isi;v. Mr Raymond '■■ ■■ left Tu iaj EQu >pe, to enjoy a 

I rip he has for SORie tl t>i pal ing. 

BRBVORT. — Mr. Wm'. Hrevort, Jr.. h i Portland, Ore., 

Indefinitely. 
BISHOP Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Bishop. Jr., left Wednesday for a 

pleasure Lrlp to I 'anama, 
JUDSON, Mrs, Ch i and Mr. and Mis, Chester Judson left last 

Friday week foi I h on the Adriatic 

for Europi i ! 

MAUD. Mr. and Mi Charles son, QHnton 

l,;i Montague tefl for a visit ol weeks in the Ha- 

waliai 
MORSE, Mrs Samu ursday for a visit in the East 

OTIS, v r. and Mrs. Hall McAllister and Miss 

\Uister on a trip to Ad Canyon. 

I'MIl, I. ll ' voyage party gathered at the 

son to hid farewell to Col. and Mrs. Cbas 

. mpton. 
VAI.I.i: lam M, Vallette left Monday for a trip to New 

VINCENT Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Rose Vincent left Tuesday for New 
York en route to their home in Ireland. 

Dr. Clyde Payne and Dr. Eugene Payne. Dentists, have resumed 

practice at 146 Grant avenue. Telephone Kearny 66. Hours: 9 to 4. 



Pears' 

Don't simply 
"get a cake of soap." 
Get good soap. Ask 
for Pears' and yon 
have pure soap. 
Then bathing will 
mean more than 
mere cleanliness; it 
will be luxury at 
trifling cost. 

Sales increasing; since 1789. 



INTIMATIONS. 

COCHRAN.— Mr. W. Bourke Cochran joined Mrs. Cochran in England 
just before the holidays, having sailed on the Olympic and embarking 
at Plymouth. 

CROCKER.— Mrs. William H. Crocker has been entertaining Madame 
Melba at New Place, and renewing a friendship with the diva formed 
in Paris several years ago. 

GRAS.— Dr. and Mrs. Edmund Gras, who have many friends in this city, 
gave a dance last week at their home in Paris. 

HENSHAW.- Mr. and Mrs. "William G. Henshaw are expected home this 
week from New York, where Mrs. Henshaw has been visiting friends 
during her husband's brief trip to Europe. 

HOUGH. — Commander H. H. Hough, who is the American naval attache 
in Paris, has given interesting accounts of the successful experiments 
made between Eiffel Tower and Arlington. 

INNES-KER. — Lord Alaister Innes-Ker of London, who will arrive at 
I loronado the last of next week, and will be the guest of Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Dupee at their attractive home on Ocean Boulevard, is one 
of the crack polo players of the Life Guards. 

KKLLCGG.— F. YV. Kellogg is at the Hotel del Coronado. 

KING— Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Randolph King and their son, Mr. Wm. 
King expect to leave; this week for Europe, where they will spend 
several months in travel, 

KOHL. — Mrs. C. Frederick Kohl is at the Hotel del Coronado. 

LOCKHART. — Miss Florence Lockhart is enjoying a stay at the Hotel 
del Coronado. 

MACDONALP— Mr. and Mrs. Alan Macdonald are now occupying their 
handsome new home at Sea Cliff, overlooking the Pacific in one of 
the most picturesque of the scenic suburban additions. 

'.II" r.!;i; Miss Mauricis Mintzer and Mr. Lueio Mintzer have decided 
to coin.' to town for a few months, and have rented the flat on Green 
i of Mr. and Mrs. Francis Morgan Grace. 
1 1 IAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Horace W. Morgan have issued invitations for 
an Informal dancing party that is tn be given at their home in Wash- 
ington street on Saturday evening, January 17th. 

OELRICH9 Era Harry Oelrichs are at present in Egypt, where 

they will remain several weeks. 

peters. — On December 16th, Mr. Charles Rollo Peters exhibited about 
fifteen portrait heads of various tvpns of Breton women, notably one 
of a child, besides a number of strong drawings which attracted a 
great deal of attention and elicited most favorable comment. At pres- 
ent he is in London, where he will continue his creditable work, with 
the intention of giving an exposition at the Bailey Gallery in Bond 
street. lie plans to return to San Francisco in the spring. 

SCHUMANN. t Roland Schumann of the cruiser Callfornli 

re the arrival of his ship in order to 
New rear's with his wife. 

RODGERS. — Rear Admiral Rodgers. 0. S. X.. Mrs. Rodgers and their 
U Lon in Southern E*TS 

SIDEBOTHAM.— Mrs. H. P. Umbsen and Miss Sldebotham expect to leave 
on the 15th for Philadelphia to visit the family of the latter's fiance. 
Mr. Harry Thayer. 

SPRECKELS.— Mr. and Mrs. C'.aus August Spreekels have closed their 
apartment on the Avenue du Bois de Boulogne in Paris, and have gone 
t-> Cap Martin. 

STRUVE.— Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Struve of Seattle are visiting thefr 
friends in town. 

TEVK.~Mrs, William S. Tevis has returned to her home in San Mateo 
after having spent the holidays in Bakersfield. 

WRIGHT— Miss Helen Wright has sent out invitations for an Informal 
dinner Saturday evening. January lnth. preceding the Junior As- 
sembly. 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 10, 1914. 



ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

St. Francis.— M. Maurice, the celebrated apostle 
of the new dances, will make his bow in San Fran- 
cisco next Monday at the St. Francis Hotel. M. 
Maurice will be accompanied by his wife, Florence 
Walton, and in company they will demonstrate the 
tango and other dances at the "The Dansant" and 
the after-the-theatre supper in the newly deco- 
rated Rose Restaurant. It was Maurice who gave 
the tango the vogue in Paris, Berlin, London and 
New York. People who have seen him claim that his 
dancing is something to rave about, and as all fancy 
seems to run danceward, there is little doubt but that 
the famous tangoist will reap a full measure of popu- 
larity here. His appearance at the select dansants on 
Mondays and Fridays will afford society matrons an 
excellent view of his characteristic grace. Admission 
to these affairs is limited to ticket-holders. The 
Rose Restaurant will be open to the public for after- 
the-theatre parties. 

* * * 

Orpheum. — The Orpheum bill for next week will 
have as its joint headline attractions, Maurice and 
Florence Walton, the world's most popular ballroom 
dancers, who were the rage of London, Paris and 
New York, and Nance O'Neil and her company in the 
one-act play, "In Self Defense" or "The Second 
Ash Tray," by Gaston Mervale. Miss O'Neil's en- 
gagement will be for one week only. Maurice and 
Walton will include in their program Valse Clas- 
sique, Argentine "Tango," Hesitation Waltz, and 
Maurice Walk. 

Bert Fitzgibbon, the original Daffy Dill, will give 
the audiences fifteen minutes of genuine enjoyment. 

Martin E. Johnson, the only white man to make 
the entire voyage of the South Sea Islands with Jack 
London in his little 45-foot yacht, "The Snark," will 
show his own motion pictures of life in the far-off 
South Pacific Islands. 

Daisy Leon, the little prima donna, erstwhile a 
Gus Edwards child protege, will contribute a fasci- 
nating turn. 

Roberto, the famous European juggler, with Bea 
Verea, an excellent vocalist, will furnish unique en- 
tertainment. 



Columbia Theatre. — Otis Skinner in Edward Knoblauch's 
Oriental drama, "Kismet," presented by Klaw & Erlanger and 
Harrison Grey Fiske, will begin a two weeks' engagement at 
the Columbia Theatre next Monday night, January 12th. "Kis- 
met," though described as "An Arabian Night," is not, however, 
a dramatization of any one of Schecherezade's remarkable 
stories. Rather it is a paraphrase of them all. The plot, the 
incidents and the characters, are original with Mr. Knoblauch, 
yet so thoroughly did he saturate himself with the wondrous 
tales that their flavor permeates the play from beginning to 
end. The intrigue, the humor, the lightning quick changes of 
fortune, the splendors and barbarities, the pomp and pagean- 
try, the craft, cunning and wit of Oriental life as revealed in 
"The Arabian Nights" are all present in "Kismet," and are 
woven together in a gorgeous dramatic tapestry, the charm of 
which is indescribable. 

Owing to the length of the performance, the curtain will rise 
promptly at eight o'clock evenings, and at two o'clock at the 
Wednesday and Saturday matinees. 

* * * 
_ Tivoli. — There is a never-to-be-forgotten fascination about a 
circus and all that pertains to circus life, and in "Thor, Lord of 
the Jungles," which will be seen at the Tivoli for the week 
commencing Sunday, the spectator will be taken back to the 
days of childhood and given every thrill that goes with the ad- 
vent of the big white tents. The gripping story takes place on 
two continents, sweeping from the primeval jungles of wildest 
Africa to the busy haunts of men, and the crowds that go with 
the three rings of the "greatest aggregation in the world." 
"Thor" is the name of the African lion, and Kathlyn Williams, 
the favorite motion picture actress, will play Gene. A supple- 
mentary picture of exceptional interest will be "A Waif of the 




M. Maurice and Florence Walton, who will appear at the Or- 
pheum next week, commencing Sunday afternoon. They will 
also be seen at the Rose Restaurant of the St. Francis Hotel, 
during the After-the-Theatre Supper, commencing January 12. 

Plains," a drama of frontier life in three reels, while a Key- 
stone comedy will furnish diversity to the bill. 

"The Third Degree," the filmatization of Charles Klein's 
great play of the same name, will be shown at the Tivoli for the 

last times this Saturday evening. 

» * » 

The Savoy. — Ordinary adjectives are not expressive enough 
when it comes to describing George Kleine's latest production, 
the Cines photo-drama "Antony and Cleopatra," which has 
created a remarkable sensation at the Savoy Theatre, and 
which will commence the second week of a most successful en- 
gagement on Monday afternoon. Nothing approaching it has 
ever been revealed upon the screen since the art of motion pho- 
tography was first discovered. Even "Quo Vadis," which was 
made by the same company, pales into insignificance beside it, 
and "Quo Vadis," up to the present, has been considered the 
world's photo-drama masterpiece. The embarkation of the 
Roman army for Egypt, the Roman Senate in session, and 
Cleopatra at her court, are but a few of the big scenes. Mati- 
nees of "Antony and Cleopatra" are given daily at 2 :20, with 
evening performances at 8:30, and the delightful incidental 
music given by Hans Koenig and his picked musicians makes 

the entertainment doubly pleasing. 

* * * 

A Icazar.— Next week, commencing Monday night, January 
12th, will mark the farewell appearances this season of those 
two brilliant artists, Evelyn Vaughan and Bert Lytell, at the 



January 10, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



Alcazar Theatre. In casting around for a suitable vehicle for 
such an auspicious occasion the Alcazar management hit upon 
the happy scheme of having the patrons of the theatre vote 
for the play they would prefer as the medium for their favorites' 
farewell. Hundreds of letters poured into the box office, and 
out of every ten were found from seven to nine requests for a 
revival of Bisson's great epochal drama of mother love, "Madam 
X." This great dramatic sensation, therefore, will be offered at 
the Alcazar all of next week, Miss Vaughan and Mr. Lytell 
closing their engagement in it on Sunday night, January 18th. 
Following comes another Alcazar surprise, The great Irish 
singing actor, Andrew Mack, will open a starring engagement 
at the popular O'Farrell street playhouse in "Tom Moore," a de- 
lightful play of Ireland's premier poet. 



Julia Obernesser, whose arpeggios in Liszt's Romance and 
Recitative, "The Evening Star," were daintily executed. Miss 
Vine Burns has discovered the key to the true combination of 
technique and poesy. That was evident in her "Song Without 
Words" in E Major, Mendelssohn, and Lavallee's "Papillon." 
Mr. Carl Gunderson closed the program with Liszt's Liebe- 
straum" in a very effective manner. 



— —"Little g ' r '' w ^ at nave y° u ' n vour basket?" asked the 
inquisitive man. "If mother'd wanted everybody to know she 
wouldn't have put the lid on so tight," oiDed the little miss- 
Ex. 



Orpheum 



Symphony Concerts, Second Series. — The 2d series of Fri- 
day afternoon symphony concerts to be given by the San Fran- 
cisco Symphony Orchestra at the Cort Theatre will begin Fri- 
day afternoon at 3 o'clock, with Kathleen Parlow, violin solo- 
ist. 

The list of assisting artists engaged .for the coming series 
of symphony concerts include: Kathleen Parlow, violinist; 
Corinne Frada, a child pianist of exceptional talent; Josef 
Hofmann, pianist; Fritz Kreisler, violinist, and Jean Gerardy, - 

'cellist. Among the novelties to be performed are: Hadley, \j(Jb%$j\Jl TrlGdtVB 
Rhapsody, "The Culprit Fay;" Chadwick, "Symphonic * 

Sketches," Debussy, "The Sea Pictures," Strauss, Symphonic 
Poem, "Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks," Sibelius, Sympho- 
nic poem, "Swan of Tuonela." 



O'Farrell Street Bet, Stoektonand Powell 
Phone DoukIhs 70 

Safest and Most Magnificent Theatre in America 
Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

A MARVELOUS NEW SHOW 
MAURICE AND FLORENCE WALTON, World's Most, Popular Ball Room 
Dancers; NANCE O'NEIL & CO in "In Self Defensa" or The Second Uh 
Tray" ( One Week Only I; BERT FITZGIBBON, The Original Dairy Dill: 
MARTIN JOHNSON'S Travelogues, Stories and Pictures of the Jack London 
Tour of the South Sea Islands; DAISY LEON, The Little Prima Donna- 
ROBERTO, Europe's Famous Juggler Assisted by BEA VERERA. the 
Famous Singer; MAUDE MULLER and ED STANLEY; WORLD'S NEWS IN 
MOTION VIEWS; Last Week HORACE GOLDIN, The Royal Illusionist pre- 
senting "The Old and the New and a Tiger God Too." 
Evening prices, 10c. 25c, 50c. 75c. Box seats, $1. Matinee prices 
(except Sundays and holidays), 10c, 25c, 50c. 

O'Farrell, Opposite Orpheum 
Phone Sutter 4111 



Alcazar Theatre 



The Gaiety. — The introduction of new business, new songs 
and new comedians has given a new lease of life to "The Girl at 
the Gate" at the Gaiety, and in consequence business has in- 
creased in the same measure as popular appreciation has 
grown of the efforts to make this a thoroughly entertaining 
show. Much of this emphatic commendation on the part of the 
public is undoubtedly due to Bickel and Watson. San Fran- 
ciscans won't have so very much longer to enjoy the perform- 
ances of their favorite comedienne, Irene Franklin, for the 
course of "The Girl at the Gate" will steer her away from 
O'Farrell street very shortly, so that those who have not yet 

heard Miss Franklin's new numbers at the Gaiety will be well SaVOV 1 /lf2CttT6 
advised if they rectify their omission before it is too late. The 
Gaiety's new production starring Marie Dressier is well on its 
way to completion, and though no definite date has been yet 
announced for its opening, the probabilities are that it will take 
place some time during the present month. 



America's Most Popular Comedienne 

IRENE FRANKLIN 
Supported by 00 Comedians, Singers and Dancers in the Musical Merriment 

THE GIRL AT THE GATE 
Another $2.00 Worth for $1.00. 

PRICES— Nights. Saturday and Sunday Matinees, 25c to $1.00; Thursday 
Matinee, 25c. , r )0c, 75c. 



O'Farrell Street near Powell 
Phone Kearny 2 
Week Commencing Monday Night. January 12th. Farewell Week of 

EVELYN VAUGHAN-BERT LYTELL 
Supported by t lie Alcazar Players In A Splendid Revival, At the Request 
of Hundreds of Our Patrons, Of Their Greatest Success 

MADAM X 
A Dramatic Sensation 
Prices— Night, 25c to $1; Mat. 25c to roc. 

M ; , l s, THURSDAY. SATURDAY, SUNDAY. 

MONDAY, JANUARY 19th. ANDREW MACK. Supported by The Alcazar 
riayers in "TOM MOORE." 

"The Playhouse Beautiful" 
McAllister St. near Market 
Phone Market 130 
Uatlnee 2:30 DAILY Night 8:30 
Mr. George Kleine's Wondrous Photo-Drama 

ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA 
Tin' Peer of All Spectacular Productions, in S Parts. 
All S.-ats Reserved, 25c. and 50c. 



Kohler & Chase Hall. — This week's Matinee of Music, which 
will be given under the auspices of Kohler & Chase this after- 
noon, will prove of more than ordinary interest Miss Anita 
Olmsted, soprano, has been chosen as the feature of this pro- 
gram, and her reputation as a concert artist is so pronounced 
that the large audience which will no doubt be in attendance 
will be charmed with the artistry of her interpretations. She 
possesses a clear voice of flexible quality. The instrumental part 
of the program has also been arranged with the greatest care, 
and the compositions, which will be rendered on the Knabe 
Player Piano and on the Pipe Organ, will prove to belong to the 
very best class of musical literature. The program folows: 

Polonaise Militaire (Chopin), Knabe Player Piano; Winds in 
the Trees (Thomas), To You (Speaks), Miss Olmsted, with 
Knabe Player Piano accompaniment; Minuet (Paderewski), 
Knabe Player Piano; At Dawning (Cadman), Toys' Lament 
(D'Hardelot), Miss Olmsted, with Knabe Player Piano accom- 
paniment; Selection, Pipe Organ. 

• • * 

The Kruger Club. 

The Kruger Club gave a very interesting piano recital in the 
studio of Georg Kruger last Monday evening. The program 
was opened by Miss Flora Gabriel, who played "Les Sylvains" 
by Chaminade in a charming manner. Miss Mary Sweeny fol- 
lowed with a dainty Valse Mignonne by Schutt. Miss Helen 
Auer evidently loves the mystic in Grieg — she showed it in her 
interpretation of his "To the Spring," while in Miss Marie 
Riesener's playing of Chopin's "Nocturne" in E Flat major, and 
Gruenfeldt's "Serenade," execution was of paramount import- 
ance, coupled with expression, which was also true of Miss 



Columbia Theatre 



Cnriier Geary and Mason Streets 
Phone Franklin l;">j 

The Leading Playhouse 
TWO WEEKS REr;iNNIN<; MONDAY JANUARY Uth. MATINEES WED- 
NESDAYS AND SATURDAYS 
Klnw and Erlanger Present 

OTIS SKINNER 
I Uy Arrangement with Charles Frohnmn ) 
In "An Arabian Night" 
KISMET 
Itv Edward Knoblauch, Produced and managed by Harrison Grey Fiske. 
PRICES- Evenings ami Saturday Matinees. 26c to t-\ 
25c to tLBO. 



Tivoli Photo Theatre 

To-day — Last Time- "THE THIRD DEGREE,' 

Commencing Sunday and All Next Week j 



Eddy Street near Market 
Photu-Plays de Luxe 



THOR, LORD OF THE JUNGLES 

A Romance Of the Wild and the Big White Tut-. 

Continuous, 12 M. to U P. M.. Daily. Matinees 10c: Evenings. 10 and 30c. 



HOTEL SHATTUCK 

FIREPROOF 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Thirty-five Minutes From San Francisco 

$3.00 per day American Plan $1.50 per day European Plan 



TELEPHONE PROSPECT 1973 

OLITA LUNT YOUNGBERG 

Pupils received for the modern dances. Rag, Tango, 
Hesitation Waltz, Relaxation, Grace Culture. Interpre- 
tation of Song. 

1443 POLK STREET STUDIO 11 

SKETCHES IN VAUDEVILLE FURNISHED 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 10, 1914. 





FINANCIAL 




Standard Oil Hits 
$100,000,000 Mark. 



Security Market 
East and Abroad. 



The week was marked with a pal- 
pable increase in prices among the 
best issues, based on Union Pacific's 
announcement to distribute its hold- 
ings of B. P. & O. to shareholders; this, with other distributions, 
will total a disbursement of approximately $31 per share to 
stockholders. Though bullish operations on any extended scale 
are still under check, the action of Union and other big national 
corporations is ingrafting a very much better feeling in business 
and security prospect, as it indicates that the directors of these 
so-called trusts are now inclined to submit to the demands of 
the Wilson administration. The American Tel. & Tel. Co. has 
voluntarily consented to the severance of the Western Union 
Tel. from its system, and the market value of its stock has 
strengthened greatly in consequence, despite the rabid scream 
of the yellow press that the severance of the two big corpora- 
tion would create a higher price to the public and a tighter or- 
ganized trust than ever. Public sentiment evidently believes 
otherwise, for as fast as these trusts accept the demands of 
U. S. Attorney General McReynolds regarding their dissolution 
and the satisfactory distribution of the pooled stocks, the prices 
of their shares invariably rise under the support of the invest- 
ing public. This has been the case, even in the distribution of 
the Standard Oil shares. New Haven consented, this week, to 
sell its Boston & Maine stock under the direction of Attorney- 
General McReynolds, and like negotiations are under way with 
other big corporations which have bumped into the Sherman 
Anti-Trust Act. As usual, the advances in the market caused 
by these disintegrations and ether bullish sentiments are met 
with profit-taking and slight set-backs. The outlook, however, 
is generally regarded as improving. Abroad, the Bank of 
England is said to be considering the reduction of its discount 
rate. Greece has authorized a loan of $100,000,000 of five per 
cent bonds to finance its war debts, and Servia one of $50,- 
000,000 in Paris at 93y 2 . The Balkan States are all in bad 
plight financially, and may be expected to ask Europe for loans 
to tide them over. Germany is holding money very tight, but 
generally the situation abroad shows slight improvement. This 
is indicated by France, where the embargo on the Bourse for- 
bidding the flotation of corporate and other bonds in precedence 
of government issues has been in a measure lifted. 



Better Tone in 
Local. Securities. 



The local market continued to show 
a firmer tone under the influence of 
the January disbursements of inter- 
est and dividends looking for bar- 
gains. Trading improved in certain favorite issues for this 
reason. Associated Oil was the feature among the listed stocks, 
and reached 42 L 2 , a gain of some 4 points within 10 days. To- 
wards the close of the week it began to develop signs of easing 
off, due to profit taking by those who got aboard when the price 
was around 38%- Several causes are assigned for the sharp 
rise ; among them a report that the Shell-Royal Dutch interests 
are negotiating for the purchase of the controlling interest of 
the company held by the S. P. Co.; another report is to the 
effect that Associated is in such a good financial position that 
the directors are considering the proposition of. increasing the 
dividend rate. Standard of California declared a dividend of 
$2.50 per share this week, payable March 16th to shareholders 
of February 2d. The company is in such a strong position that 
it proposes to increase its capital stock to 1,000,000 shares, 
valued at $100,000,000; details of this increase will be found 
below in this column. Directors of the Federal Sugar Refining 
Company declared the regular quarterly dividend of iy 2 per 
cent on the preferred stock, but passed the regular quarterly 
dividend of l 1 ^ per cent on common. Trading in the Exchange 
for the first week of 1914 shows a falling off as compared with 
the same period of last year. A more optimistic feeling is in 
the air, however, and investors incline to think that trade and 
confidence will increase with the spring weather. 



Standard Oil directors came out 
into the open this week with a mild 
sensation in financial circles by an- 
nouncing a proposal to sharehold- 
ers to increase the capital stock of the company from 500,000 
shares, valued at $50,000,000, to 1,000,000 shares, valued at 
$100,000,000. This means the quadrupling of the capital stock 
of the company almost within a year, which is going some in the 
face of the general complaint of hard times. Oil, however, 
seems to be king in California. According to the notice sent 
shareholders, this proposition to increase the capital stock will 
be voted on at Richmond, March 16th next. The same announce- 



statement of the condition of the 

BANK OF ITALY 

SAVINGS MEMBER COMMERCIAL 

Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

The San Francisco Clearing House Association 

DECEMBER 31, 1913 

* ASSETS 

Blrsl Mortgage Loans on Real Estate $6,031,879.58 

Real Estate, Bank Buildings, Furniture, Fixtures anil 

Safe Deposit Vaults 783.647.07 

Time Loans (Collateral and Personal) 1.500.362.15 

Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit 38.681.56 

' illa-i Assels 42.766.84 

United stabs, stale. Munich. ' ami Other 

■:■■ ' Iii6.7ni; I 

Demand Loans (Collateral and Personal).. S,760,543.2Q 

CASH 2.328.324.80 7,485,574.41 

$15,882,911.61 

LIABILITIES. 

Capital Paid Up } 1.250.000.00 

Saii. ins and Undivided i its 330,389.73 

i 37,598.00 

ii 38,681.56 

DEPOSITS .$14,226.242.32 

$15.382.911.61 

STATE OP CALIFI IRNIA 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAX FRANCISCO 

A, P. GIANNIN1 and A. PBDRINI, being i ich separately, duly 
sworn, each for himself, bi d A. P. Gianninl Is VJce-Presl- 

d Hid Manager, and that said A. Pedrlnl is Cashier of the Bank 

ol [taly, the corporation above mentioned, and thai every state- 
in. at contained therein is true of our own knowledge and bi 

A. P, GIANNINI. 
A. PEDRINI. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 31st day of December, 
I'.i:;. THOMAS S. BIJRNES. Notary Public. 

THE STORY OF OUR GROWTH 

As Shown by a Comparative Statement of Our Assets 

DBCEHBEB81, lw>i I28u.4r(fl,07 

[H i I MUKR 31. 1905 - Sl.Ml.290.80 

DECEMBER 81, 1906 - • $1,899,947.28 

DECEMBER 31. 1907 $2,221,347.35 

DECEMBER 31, 1908 .... $>,574,004.90 

DECEMBER 31, 1909 $8,817,217.70 

DECEMBER 31, 1910 - - - §6,539,861.47 

DECEMBER 31, 1911 - - - $8,379,347.02 

DECEMBER 31, 1912 - - $11,228,814.56 

DECEMBER 31, 1913 - $15,882,911.61 

Number of Depositors 42,738 
DIRECTORS 

I. BCATBNA. President. JAMES C. KAYS. 

JAS i PAGAN, Capitalist, Los Angeles, 

nt The Crocker GEO. J. GIANNINI, 

National Bank, San Francisco. president L. Scatena & So., 

ADOLF l.i Shi Francisco and Oakland. 

In -idont A. Levy & J. Zent- J. WISEMAN MACDONALD, 

in -r Co., San Francisco and Attoi n.-> -at-Law, Los An- 

i lakland. geles. 

JAMES FTJGAZI, JOHN LAGOMARSINO. 

Agenzla Fugazl Pacific Coast Merchant and Banker, Ven- 

Compagnle Generate tura md Santa Barbara Coun- 

Transatlantlque (French ties 

Steamship Line.) ,,r> r n r> vcroAT.TTPT 

StvSp^SJ'IS 1 ' Vlce - Presldent Physician and Surgeon, San 

NILk.^ l tSAsiu, Francisco 

. xilis Pease Invest- w r t-.ttijoxm 

m; '^iVc^MKVr 63 - -gaff Bank of Italy. Los 

I ;i, sictan and Surgeon. San c /™.% e R S 0ND0NA , 

SECONDO 'GUASTI, Rf al ^f^^n*™"^" 

lent Italian Vineyard Co. "-J-- F FAA f' R ^,°\ „„ „, „ 

les and Gur.sti. F. s . ene | & Pellerano. Dnig- 

[OVANN1 PERRO, gists. San Jose. 

Schlappapletra Estate. Ven- SAM B. FUGAZI. 

tura; G. Ferro & Co.. Ventura. Agenzia Fugazl. Pacific Coast 

i.os Angeles and New York. Agency Compagnie Generate 

1- C HALE, Transatlantiquo (French 

Mil. Bros. Inc.. San Fran- Steamship Line.) 

Cisco; Hale Bros.. Inc., Oak- P. J. DREHER. 

1; Hal,. Bros. Inc., Sacra- Vice-President California 

mento; Hale Bros.. Inc. Stock- Fruit Growers' Ex- 

ton; J. M. Hale Co.. Los An- Los Angeles; Secretary and 

ii, A. Hale & Co., San Manager San Antonio Fruit 

Jose Exchange, Pomona; Vlce- 

DR \. II. GIANNINI, President Fruit Growers' 

Vice-President Supply Co.. Los Angeles. 

Savings Deposits Made on or Before January lOth 
Will Earn Interest From January 1st 



January 10, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



ment to shareholders also contained the information that the 
regular quarterly dividend of $2.50 per share would be paid 
March 1st, to shareholders of record February 2d. The direc- 
tors also authorized, subject to the consent of the State Railroad 
Commission the sale at part of the 45,184 shares of stock of the 
company held jn the treasury since the capital was increased a 
little over a year ago. Shareholders of record of the company 
of February 2d will be entitled to subscribe to these shares in 
proportion to their present holdings. Warrants to each share- 
holder will be mailed, and the answers to exercise these options 
must be returned to the office by March 10th. 



The statement of the Hibernia Bank just published shows 

a remarkable record. Assets amount to $58,298,801.75. All 
the investments are in gilt edge securities, and show wonderful 
sagacity and good judgment on the part of those handling this 
large amount of money. The depositors are - certainly to be 
congratulated on the very healthy condition of this great Pacific 
Coast institution. 



The Ford Automobile Co., of Detroit, announced this 

week that it will distribute $10,000,000 among its employees. 
According to plans, disbursements will begin January 12th, and 
continue monthly; wages of all men employed by the company 
over 22 years old will be doubled, regardless of the length of 
time they have been with the company. 



The Anglo-California Trust Company was the first local 

State bank towards securing the Federal Reserve. On learn- 
ing that the new law was open for action, the bank promptly 
wired Secretary of the Treasury McAdoo an application for ad- 
mission to membership. 



Nevada Hills Mining Company reports for November 

net profits of $8,069, which increases the resources of the com- 
pany to $181,416, with no outstanding liabilities. 



A man who had been dining well crept home at 4 a. m. 

and managed to get into the library of his home without meet- 
ing his wife. He lit all the electric lights he could reach and 
sat down in the big chair in the middle of the room reading. 
He forgot to take off his overcoat and hat. His wife appeared 
in the doorway. "Henry!" she said, severely, "what are you 
doing here at this hour?" "I'm (hie) reading a book, m'dear," 
explained he. "I've had this-sh book for years and (hie) I've 
never had time to read it until to-night, and now I'm going to 
finish it." "Henry!" said his wife, even more severely, "put 
down that suitcase this minute and go to bed." — New York 
Tribune. 



The Vienna Cafe at 171 O'Farrell street, more than holds 

its own in the stiff competition among the first class restaurants 
of San Francisco, and it is able to do this by reason of the ap- 
petizing specialties which are made a feature of the place. 
Among other service of this special character may be noted the 
juicy steaks for which the house has acquired a just reputa- 
tion. Indeed, the cuisine is all good, and a pleasant feature 
characteristic of the place is that prices are moderate. The 
management of the house is thoroughly experienced, and lives 
up to the best traditions of epicurean service and cookery. The 
house has a regular clientele, which has discovered its culinary 
perfections, and the patronage grows day by day because the 
house makes good. Visitors to San Francisco should not omit 
the opportunity to test the fine cuisine and popular prices of the 
Vienna Cafe. (Adm 



TELEPHONE DOUGLAS 2487 



E. 



CO. 



F. HUTTON &. 

THE PIONEER HOUSE 

INVESTMENT BONDS 
490 California Street 

Branch ST. FRANCIS HOTEL. SAN FRANCISCO 



New York E 
New S 
■ 
Chicago Tto:ml of Trade 



Two Prlvati 

Chl< Fork ' 

. - 

- 
- 



AUCTION 

MONDAY 
JANUARY 19TH, 1914 

AT 12 O'CLOCK NOON 
AT OUR SALESROOM 

20 MONTGOMERY STREET 

PARCEL 1 

Choice Business lot in the heart of the 
busy Mission District. East line Mission 
Street, between 17th and 18th Streets 
Size 50 x 122.6. Will sub-divide. 

and 

PARCEL 2 

Choice Building Lots 

Southwesterly line Precita Avenue 420 
feet northwesterly from Folsom Street 
Size 80 x 243 to Bernal Avenue. A good 
opportunity for builders. 

FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS APPLY TO . 

G. H. Umbsen & Co. 

Real Estate Auctioneers 20 MONTGOMERY STREET 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

Established il;8 

SUTRO & CO. 

410 Montgomery Street 

Detailed Information in Regard to Any Security 

Will be Furniehed Upon Requeet 

Members-The San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange 



APPLICATION OF GUARDIAN FOR LEAVE TO MORTGAGE REAL ESTATE 
IN THE SUPERIOR rRT OP THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA in inA 

, . ,•,'■',,■■, ^D COUNTY OF SAN kkanVm". ■ m" N "' ™ ANn 

111 01 l Ml ESTATE AND GUARDIANSHIP nl.' rotj 
FRANCIS ATKINS, A MINOR H "' , ' NMin '" ''"'- 

1 I"'" •■■>'*"<;■; <>■■ petitlo rein of Etta M Blake the 

. minor 

■' '■ sage the . rein and 

b i ■. i i ...!-■ aring therefor 

' '- Inter 

rtrooi pi 10 

?stree 
San state of i-, . ,„in „„ 

they haven 

n lor such 

All that certain Iol - , e i od. situate, lying- an >lne In 

ftKuuiuiart] 

"£, NCII J° : '\ •'. '' ■ Pine street distant 

p| JoSm 
of Pine 

""'"' , - 5 f., 

he nolm 
e a part of SO P° nt 

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED low Cause ho n,.h 

lardlan on fll 
8th, 1914. 

'""*- >: 'il'.AHAM, 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
Joshua Hendy Iron Works. 
The regular annual m kholders of • ir„,wi„ 

■ 'nff 

IARDNER S*. r-t»rv 

Office— No. 75 Fremont 



20 



San F: 



rancisco 



News Letter 



JANUARY 10, 1914. 




INSVMCB 




WESTERN STATES LIFE. 
Last year this big millionaire company, with Warren D. Por- 
ter at its head, wrote 2,650 policies, representing $5,500,000 of 
insurance. This brings the total insurance in force carried by 
the Western Life up to about $12,000,000 represented by 5,450 
policies, a gain of $3,000,000 over the previous year. Only a 
life insurance man knows what is meant by a gain of 25 per 
cent in a single year. The wisdom of the management was 
shown early in its career by the engagement of an expert under- 
writer to look after the producing end of the business. The 
figures prove tint H. J. Saunders, the company's vice-president 
and manager of agencies, has made good, and full credit has 
been accorded him for his wonderful accomplishment. One 
hundred and thirty-five producers under his direction have con- 
tributed to this result. No company anywhere near the age of 
the Western States can show such a list of trained producers. 
The company faces the new year in splendid shape. It has 
builded broadly and strongly. The assets exceed $1,600,000, 
a gain during 1913 of $140,000. The total premium income last 
year was about $465,000, a gain of $100,000, and during the 
year the company's interest income increased more than $80,000 
— swelling the total income to $545,000. There is food here for 
thought. "Western money, Western made, should stay at home 

for Western trade." 

* * * 

The New World Life of Spokane has been examined by the 
insurance department of the State of Washington, and the publi- 
cation of its report shows the company to be solvent, and what 
is termed a "going condition," but criticism is made for failure 
of the company to comply with the laws in all particulars. The 
department discovered that the president of the company has 
been receiving commissions on the sale of insurance made in 
connection with the loaning or investment of the company's 
funds, and that the officers have been receiving a rebate on in- 
surance on their own lives. Complaint is made that salaries are 
too high. The contract made with the Columbia Underwriters 
is also criticised. The commissioner claims that it is impossible 
to profitably carry out the terms of ths contract. The exami- 
ners suggest that remedies for the correction of these and other 

bad practices be adopted. 

* * * 

John J. Clayton has been engaged by the California Insur- 
ance Company to do field work in California, covering the ter- 
ritory vacated by C. C. Coleman, who enters the San Francisco 
office in a clerical capacity. Clayton has spent all his life in 
the field and is thoroughly competent. Frank Cleves, Jr., re- 
signs as special agent of the Capital Fire of Sacramento, to do 
field work for the Hoadley Agency. His territory will embrace 
the central part of the State. • 

* « * 

George F. Roberts was engaged on January 1st to do field 
work for the Aetna Fire under Manager Breeding. He will have 
charge of Northern California, with headquarters at San Fran- 
cisco. He has been acting as special agent for the Phoenix of 
London. 

* * * 

H. M. Dinsmore has resigned as special agent for the West- 
ern Assurance, and accepted a position as special agent for the 
Prussian National, covering Northern California. 

* * * 

John J. Sheahan, assistant general agent of the Home Fire 
Insurance Company of New York, will leave on January 14th 
for Honolulu to enter his company in the Islands. He will be 
absent for about five weeks. 

* * » 

C. W. Stone, formerly with the board office at Vancouver and 
with Seely & Co., of Seattle, has been appointed special agent 
for the Miller, Henley and Scott office, managers of the West- 
ern Assurance Company for the Coast States. Mr. Stone takes 
the place of H. N. Dinsmore, who has accepted a position with 
the Prussian National. He will travel in California only. 



Announcement was made Saturday by the Industrial Acci- 
dent Commission of the following appointments: Dr. Morton 
R. Gibbons, accident director; C. W. Fellows, manager of in- 
surance department; Chris M. Bradley, attorney; John R. Brow- 
nell, superintendent of safety. With the exception of Brownell, 
who comes from Steelton, Pennsylvania, all the appointees are 

residents of San Francisco. 

* * * 

H. M. Hinchman succeeds Johnson & Higgins as general 

agent of the United States Lloyds automobile department on 

the Coast. 

» * * 

The Unit Standard Life Company, of Los Angeles, organized 
in September of last year, announces that it expects to be writ- 
ing business before June 1st. The Unit is to have $300,000 
capital and $100,000 surplus. The officers have not yet been 

elected. 

* * * 

John D. Giles has been appointed director of agencies of the 
Beneficial Life of Salt Lake. The company will for the present 
confine its operations to the State of Utah. 



1863 



1913 



FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 

Capital $1,500,000 Assets, $10,000,000 

FIRE MARINE AUTOMOBILE 

California and Saniome Streets, San Francisco, California. 

The West Coast Life Ins. Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

A strong, welt-managed Institution ; organized under the rigid Insurance 
.aws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit, and define and 
guard the Interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 

The Connecticut Fire Ins. Co. 

OF HARTFORD. ESTABLISHED 1850. 
SIXTY-THIRD ANNUAL STATEMENT. 

Capital $1,000,000 

Total Aeeeta 7.735,110 

Surplus to Policyholder 3.266,021 

Pacific Department: 

The Insurance Exchange San Francisco, Cal. 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager. 
Geo. E. Hilling! Roy C. Ward Geo. B. Diosmore J. C. Meeudorffer Jimet W. Dein 

GEO. E. BILLINGS CO. 

INSURANCE BROKERS AND AVERAGE ADJUSTERS 
$12 California St., San Francisco, Cal. Phone Douglas 2285 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 

(Best In the West) 

Employers' Liability. General Liability, Teams, Elevator. Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels. Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass. Accident and Health 
Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 



T. L. Miller. President 
Health Department. 



L. K. noge. General Manager Accident and 
Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. 

The Home Insurance Company 



Organized 1863. 



Cash Capita). J3.000.000 



Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners any- 
where In United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss by 
Are. Automobile Insurance. Indemnity for loss of rental income by fire. 
H. L. ROPF, General Agent. J. J. SHEAHAN, Ass't General Agent. 

324 Sanaome Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



January 10, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



The West Coast Life has written a group policy aggregating 
one millionjwo hundred thousand dollars on the lives of those 
employees of the United Railroads who have been with the com- 
pany three years or more. The business was written in open 
competition. Premiums were paid by the railroad company, 
and the insurance is entirely apart from the obligations of the 
Workmen's Compensation Law. 

* * » 

Companies operating in Oregon are contemplating the issu- 
ing of a new policy to be used in competition with the insurance 
written under the Oregon Workmen's Compensation act. It 
will provide for greater benefits to the employee, compensation 
being based upon actual earning capacity instead of limiting 

the benefit to $40 per month. 

* * • 

The Association of Portland Casualty Agents has been or- 
ganized, and the following officers elected : James I. Wood, 
president; Edward Pettis, vice-president; W. E. Pearson, sec- 
retary-treasurer. The Association will establish three rating 
bureaus under the supervision of the general agents of Oregon 
for liability, surety and automobile rating, but these rates will 

not be compulsory. 

* * * 

Proceedings for the final dissolution of the California 
National Life Insurance Company, of San Diego, are in pro- 
gress, and at their conclusion stock of the International Life of 
St. Louis will be distributed according to the terms of the mer- 
ger agreement. 

* * * 

Manager Briggs, of the Standard Accident, has appointed 
George A. Campbell, formerly special agent for the American 
Automobile, manager of the Standard's automobile business in 

the Pacific Coast department. 

* * * 

James S. Evans is now counter man for the Yorkshire, under 
McClure Kelly. He was for many years with the Union As- 
surance Company. 

* * * 

The following officers of the Underwriters' Equitable Rating 
Bureau of Oregon have been re-elected : W. H. Raymond, 
president; John D. Coleman, vice-president; James McCune, 

secretary. 

* * * 

The fire business of the Globe Fire, of San Antonio, has been 
re-insured in the Occidental Fire of Albuquerque, N. M. The 
Globe will hereafter confine its operations to automobile insur- 
ance. 

* • * 

The Washington Industrial Accident Boards make the aston- 
ishing assertion that safety devices have not made any appre- 
ciable reduction in the number of accidents reported. 

* * » 

John J. Sheahan, assistant general agent of the Home Fire 
Insurance Company of New York, will leave on January 14th 
for Honolulu to enter his company in the Hawaiian Islands. 

He will be absent about five weeks. 

* * * 

T. J. A. Tiedemann has resigned the Coast general agency 
of the General Accident. Charles R. Simpson, manager of the 
claims department, will look after the company's interests until 

the appointment of Mr. Tiedemann's successor. 

* • * 

The California State Life, of Sacramento, reports paid-for 
business last year four millions. Total in force, ten million 
one hundred thousand. Increase for year two million one hun- 
dred thousand. 

* • • 

Rates on liability business in Tacoma, Wash., are reported 
to be badly demoralized. Cuts of from 25 to 40 per cent are 

being made. 

* * * 

Superintendent of Agencies E. D. Field, of the National Life 
of Vermont, is on the Coast, and is expected to arrive in San 

Francisco this week. 

* * * 

There was no increase this year of the total of life insurance 
written in this country, over the amount written last year. The 
total of all the companies about equaled the total written in 
1912. 



CLUB NEWS. 
The regular annual meeting of the Union League Club will 
be held on Tuesday next, when a new board of directors will 
be elected. The following is the regular ticket: President, 
George Filmer; First Vice-President, C. J. Wood; Second Vice- 
President, F. V. Keesling; Secretary, H. F. Pernau; Treasurer, 
A. R. McLaren; Director, 1-year term, George F. Newton; 
Director, 2-year term, Jos. Seeley; Director, 2-year term, U. S. 
Webb; Director, 2-year term, Henry Avila. 



-The Bohemian Club Christmas jinks was held last Satur- 
day night, and the occasion was chiefly devoted to a pungent 
satire on the prevailing fashion of "white slave" plays. The 
play was written by Porter Garnett and C. K. Field. The cast 
included Mark Daniels, Charles Dillon, Frank Deering, Geo. 
Bell and Richard Hotaling. 

During the course of the performance, Charles Dillon was 
taken suddenly ill and had to be removed to a hospital. He is 
a member of the firm of Dillon, Goodwin & Co. 



The legal proceedings in adjustment of the tangled af- 
fairs of F. M. Smith, the deposed borax king, appear to be de- 
veloping more heat than light. Angry denials and biting sar- 
casm pay no debts. 



• fc47\jv j 


Sell and knit to order 


\ iHw; i-h>A\ 


the Pfister Quality Under- 


Hut) 1l^iC/£ 


wear, Bathing Suits, 


V«V»V Www**'*' 


Athletic Suits, Sweaters, 


knitJtingco. 


Jerseys, Shaker and 


114 SANSOME ST. 


Jumbo knit Coat 
Sweaters and Ruff Neck 


Cor. Bush 


Coats. _ 


ROOM 31 


Come and See 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society (The German Bank.) 
(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending December 31, 1913, a dividend has been de- 
. tared at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, payable 

on and after Friday, Ja iry -, 1914. Dividends not called for are added 

to the deposit memmt and earn dividends from January 1. 1914. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Manager. 
Office — 526 California street. Mission Branch — Cor. Mission and 21st 
streets. Richmond District Branch — Corner Clement St. and 7th Ave. 
Halght si. Branch — Cor. Haight and Belvedere streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Humboldt Savings Bank 
(Member Of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending December 31. 1913, a dividend lias been declared 

at the rat* Oi I) per cent per annum on all savings deposits, payable 

on and after Friday, January 2. lull. Dividends not called for are added 
rate Of Interest as the principal from January 1, 1914. 
H. C. KLEVESAHL, Cashier. 
Office— 783 Market street, near Fourth. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Bank of Italy 
(Member of the Associated E inks of San Francisco.) 

For the half year ending December 31, 1918, a dividend has I 
al the rate of four < 1 1 pei on all savings depo 

on and after Friday, January 3 1914, Dividends not called for are added 
to ami i ■■" ranuary 1, 

i:>ll \, iry 10th will earn Interest from 

• v 1, 1914. A. PEDRINI. Cashier. 

L. SCATENA, President, 
i >tti. - ier Montgomery and Clay streets. Market St. 
Market. Turk and M;i."i> str>.-'-t«. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Hibernla Savings and Loan Society. 
(Member ,.f the Associated Savings Banks of E 
i, M the hall year endli 1918, a dividend has been de- 

if four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, payable 

it >■ 2, 1914. Dividends not drawn will be added 
,,, depos I part thereof, and will earn dividend from 

ranuary i 1914 Deposits made on or before January 10, 1914. will draw 
January I. 1914. R. M, TOBIN, Secretary. 

iket. McAllister and Jones streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Italian -American Bank. 
(Member Of the ka Of Han Fran' 

F->r the half year ending December 81, 1913, a di\ : . 

lira on all savings deposits 

usuary :'. 1914. Dividends not called for will 

inclpal and bear the same rate of interest from January 

l i'»i4 Money deposited on or before January 10. 1914. will earn interest 

frt>m Januarv'l. 1914. A. SBARBORO. President. 

Office Southeast corner Montgomery and Sacramento streets. 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 10, 1914. 




By R. R. l'Hommedieu. 

Watch the News Letter 

Owners of automobiles will certainly read carefully the News 
Letter until the new motor vehicle act has been passed upon by 
the courts, for, if the law is constitutional, and they operate 
their cars without a license, they are guilty of misdemeanor and 
subject to arrest and punishment. The situation on January 
1st is that non-conformers with the law will be willful violators 
of the act, and that many of the district attorneys of the State 
will refrain from proceeding against the offenders. At the same 
time, the Attorney-General contends that the law is constitu- 
tional, and that the local officers must proceed at once to prose- 
cute those who do not comply with its provisions. 

While it is a fact that there is no authority for any officer 
of the State, other than the courts, for setting aside this law, 
and that there will be wholesale violations, it must be recog- 
nized that there is exceptional cause of refraining from paying 
the license tax at this time. If the law is valid, the license tax 
will be paid, and the State will secure all that is its due, but 
should the law be found invalid, moneys paid as taxes will be 
held by the State, and there seems to be no way by which to 
recover it. Paying a license under protest counts for naught in 
law, for the protest puts no legal strings on the money thus 
paid. 



California Wins Records 

California holds the honors of having the only automobile 
contest record made during 1913, according to the records of 
the American Automobile Association. William Schimps, 
chairman of the contest committee, has issued a statement to 
the effect that "to California goes the honor of having the only 
two new speed records made in 1913. The first was made on 
February 10th at Fresno by Earl P. Cooper, covering 200 
miles in three hours, twenty-seven minutes, twenty-three and 
three-tenths seconds on a mile dirt track. On April 27th, Bar- 
ney Oldfield cut the world's record for a mile dirt track to forty- 
six and two-fifths seconds." 



How to Complete Highway 

To those who are a bit worried about the danger of delay in 
constructing the State highway along the coast between Los 
Angeles and San Francisco, the Santa Barbara Press would sug- 
gest a very simple plan for insuring the completion of the 
work. 

The route has been surveyed and accepted, so that much is 
certain. But there is danger that the money will be all spent 
before road building in Santa Barbara County is taken up by 
the State Commission. 

The State Commission has offered to build the road, provided 
bonds to the amount required for its construction are placed. 
If Santa Barbara County will buy these bonds, or provide 
for their purchase by others, the commission will then be mor- 
ally bound to do the rest. 

How to effect the financing of the bond issue will be one of 
the important subjects discussed by the county conference this 
afternoon. It can be done in one of several ways. The county 
can purchase them, and re-sell them at a small discount ; or the 
county can make up the discount, either out of the general fund 
or by voting bonds for this purpose. The improvement is worth 
this small price. The principal of the bonds is met by the State. 
Each county has to pay interest only on the amount of money 
spent by the State within the county. 



New Gas Invented 

"One of the effects occasioned by the phenomenal rise in the 
price of petrol has been the stimulus which inventors have re- 
ceived to increase their efforts to discover some cheaper form of 
the motor fuel, which will give results equal to those of the best 
petrol," says an English correspondent of the Automobile Trade 
Journal. 

"So far, however, apart from benzol, which is almost as 
expensive as spirit, the only substitute yet produced which ap- 
pears to hold commercial possibilities is a motor fuel known as 
Economin. Under the title of Economin Motor Spirit Company, 
Ltd., a company has just been registered in London with a 
share capital of approximately $1,681,000. Among the list of 
directors are to be found several names well known in com- 
mercial motor circles. 

"The object of this concern is to acquire the patent rights for 
the production of Economin motor fuel in Great Britain and the 
Colonies, and it is considered probable that before long large 
quantities will be manufactured and placed upon the market at 
a price far below that of petrol at the present time. 

"The Economin spirit is a distillate from a mixture consist- 
ing of 80 per cent kerosene and a 20 per cent solution consisting 
of concentrated sulphuric acid, benzine and benzol, containing 
resin and picric acid in certain specific amounts, the propor- 
tion by volume of benzine plus benzol to the kerosene being 
exactly four volumes of the former to twenty-one volumes of 
the latter. The whole is then thoroughly mixed, transferred to 
a suitable vessel and allowed to stand for several hours. 

"The mixture thus obtained is then transferred to a distilling 
apparatus and distilled at temperatures varying from 225 de- 
grees C. to 240 degrees C. This distillate yielded at these tem- 
peratures, which amounts to about between 75 and 80 per cent 
of the total volume of the mixture operated upon, is Economin 
motor spirit. By carrying the distillation process still further, 
an additional yield of about 10 to 15 per cent of distillate can 
be obtained, but it is doubtful if this fraction will be of service 
as a motor fuel. 

"The productive cost of this fuel, assuming the price of kero- 
sene at $16.40 per ton, and a yield of 80 per cent of Economin 
from the ingredients employed, is calculated not to exceed $12 
per gallon, and it is a profit of 6 cents per gallon, the company 
would reap a very handsome profit. 

"It is stated that when using Economin, no carburetor ad- 
justments are required, and the motor can be started just as 
easily as on petrol. Two comparative tests of 1,000 miles each 
have been carried out on a 15 h. p. car with the above fuel and 
Shell spirit, the figures obtained proving that of the two Econo- 
min is superior both in regard to power and low consumption. 
The tests were carried out under the supervision of the Royal 
Automobile Club, and over the club's standard routes." 



Sanctioned Meets 

At a meeting of the Contest Board of the American Automo- 
bile Association, held at A. A. A. National Headquarters last 
week, requests for assignment of 1914 dates for motor car con- 
tests were considered and the following tentative dates were 
assigned, contingent upon proper completion of the preliminary 
conditions prescribed by the Contest rules : 

Promoter — Indianapolis Motor Speedway; event — 500 mile 
race; date — May 30th; Sioux City Auto Club and Speedway 
Association, 300 mile race, July 4th; Tacoma Carnival Asso- 
ciation, road races, July 3d and 4th ; Seattle Speedway, July 13th 
and 14th; Chicago Automobile Club, Elgin Road Races, Aug. 
28th and 29th; Corona Auto Association, road race, September 
9th; El Paso Auto Club, Phoenix Road Race, November. 

For the past four years all drivers of motor cars in contests 
have been required to register annually with the contest board. 
Registry cards have been issued drivers, which cards may be 
required to be exhibited to the Referee or Starter upon demand 
at any sanctioned event. Under the present rules, in all road 
races, and in" beach, speedway or dirt track meets, fifty miles 
or more in length, or in practice therefor, the crew of a car 
must consist of both driver and mechanician, and for the first 
time the coming year all mechanicians will be required to be 
registered with the contest board. 

The fee for registration of drivers has been increased from 
$2 to $3, and in addition to the usual registry card, drivers will 



January 10, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



be issued a lapel button embracing the well known wheel de- 
sign of the A. A. A. and bearing the words "Registered Racing 
Driver," with the driver's registry number. The yearly reg- 
istry fee for mechanicians will be $2, and they will be issued 
somewhat similar registry cards and lapel buttons. 



State Association Controls 

Inasmuch as there have been numerous inquiries regarding 
the status of the various automobile clubs throughout the north- 
ern part of the State regarding their affiliation with the Ameri- 
can Automobile Association, no club north of the Tehachapi 
can be affiliated with the national body only through the Cali- 
fornia State Automobile Association, as the following telegram 
will show : 



"P. J. Walker, Monadnock Building, San Francisco. — Cali- 
fornia State Automobile Association was given territorial rights 
northern section of State several years ago; until it relinquishes 
such territory, no club can join national organization except 
through it. — John A. Wilson, President American Automobile 
Association." 

* * * 

Towne Resigns 

Burton A. Towne, chairman of the California State Highway 
Commission, has resigned, and Governor Johnson has appointed 
in his place Charles F. Sterns, of Eureka. Towne, who is well 
known in San Francisco, was a very active member of the Com- 
mission, and through his experience on the $2,000,000 bond is- 
sue for good roads in San Joaquin County, did much to make the 
roads of that section world famous. 



News Gathered Along Automobile Row 



New Year's Wish 

"A Unit Molded New Year's Wish" is the cheerful cap- 
tion of the greeting the B. F. Goodrich Company sends out to 
their friends in the tire business and on the newspapers. It 
reads : 

Here's wishing you a unit molded New Year — 
May there be no layer-separations in it — 
May the fabric of its days be truly stretched and formed — 
May every moment be resilient as the livest rubber — 
May you have a Safety Tread that stops the skid before it 
starts — 

May your brake be made effective by the Safety Tread — 
May you find the year symmetrically rounded like a Good- 
rich Tire — 

May your only blow-outs be with your friends — 
May your New Year be Best in the Long Run and your 
course be as smooth and enjoyable as though you rode all the 
way on Goodrich Tires. 

* » * 

Color of Coupes 

There are fads in coupe colors, just as there are fads in 
ladies' dresses, and the ladies are also responsible for the fad 
in the colors of their closed cars. This fad has hit the East 
and Middle West full force, but apparently has not yet reached 
the Coast. The Frank O. Renstrom Co., distributors of Regal 
motor cars, anticipate that the fad will hit the Coast before 
very long, and are prepared to meet the emergency when it 
arises. Renstrom has just returned from a trip to the factory in 
Detroit, and while there he saw evidence of milady's varied 
tastes in colors. The Regal coupe seems to just about suit the 
ladies, owing to its neat lines and underslung construction, 
which impart that tone of quality and give it that low-hanging 
body so easy to enter and easy for a lady to step from. The 
Regal coupe, in the opinion of the distributors, looks like a 
five thousand dollar car, while at the same time it sells at the 
popular price. One of the most beautiful colors in coupes is 
the lavender. Still another striking color is a pale blue, which 
is affected by a wealthy lady in Cleveland, Ohio. A Philadel- 
phia lady has a Regal coupe finished in gold leaf, with gold 
plated metal parts. 

• * * 

Ads. Pay 

"It was not so many years ago that advertising was consid- 
ered unethical from a business standpoint," says L. L. King, 
manager of the advertising department of The Goodyear Tire 
& Rubber Company, Akron, O. "Many of the finest old houses 
held aloof, saying that they did not have to advertise. Even 
to-day there are some business and professional men so bound 
by custom and tradition that they have not yet availed them- 
selves of the advantages of advertising. By so much as these 
customs hold out, by just so much is the public deprived of 
knowing all about these professions and businesses. 



"The most successful and the only honest way to deal with 
the public is to play the game out in the open. If there are 
true and interesting reasons why the public should buy some- 
thing from a certain manufacturer, then this manufacturer 
should be glad of the chance to say so over and over again, 
through the medium of reliable publications. Many instances 
can be cited where present manufacturers gained a world-wide 
reputation, and their product became known throughout the en- 
tire universe, simply through their aggressiveness in pushing 
their goods through the aid of these various high class medi- 
ums." 

* * * 

Air Tires On Trucks 

"Pneumatic tires on the front wheels of a motor truck saves 
expense bills," says H. D. Knudsen, the head of the truck de- 
partment of J. W. Leavitt & Company, agents for the Willys- 
Utility truck. "When our first Willys Utility three-quarter ton 
truck was delivered to us about six months ago we made a very 
careful examination of the chassis, and realized that the design 
and construction more than fulfilled the promises made by the 
Willy's Overland Company. 

"We were especially pleased with the tire equipment, real- 
izing from past experience that the pneumatic front tires would 
be a 'life saver' and would mean many dollars saved in repair 
bills for the owner. That our faith in this construction and the 
prophecies of the Willy's Overland Company have proved 
themselves correct has been clearly shown by the trucks in 
actual service in this territory. We have sold a great many of 
these trucks during the past half year, a large majority being 
used under most severe conditions. Without exception the 
owners are loud in their praise at the pneumatic tires on front 
wheels, as the majority write us 'They save your motor.' " 

* * * 

New Empire Quarters 

The superb new headquarters and executive offices of the 
Empire Automobile Company at the corner of Capitol avenue 
and Michigan street in the heart of Indianapolis' motor colony, 
is a striking proof of the growth and expansion of the Empire 
Company and its five passenger popular priced Empire touring 
car. For a long time the old headquarters and executive offices 
were inadequate. The company could not immediately find a 
suitable location of sufficient size to warrant making a change. 
The new home is a superb business headquarters. The build- 
ing is a concrete and steel structure, three stories high, equipped 
in the most modern fashion. There are 25,000 square feet of 
floor space, and the ceilings are high, assuring light and airy 
offices and work rooms. 

* * « 

Appointed Manager 

E. W. Leslie, well known in automobile circles in the south- 
ern part of the State, has been appointed manager for the South- 
rn territory by the Haynes Auto Sales Company. 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 10, 1914. 



Farmer and the Auto 

"The business of farming is essentially dependent on the 
condition of country roads, for whatever is not produced on the 
farm must be hauled to the farm, and many crops of the farm 
must be hauled away to the railroad stations and local markets," 
says B. H. Pratt, Pacific Coast Manager of the Fisk Rubber 
Company. "Farmers sooner or later come to realize the de- 
sirability of diversified farming. Perhaps no cause limits farm- 
ing of this description as effectively as bad roads. Of course, 
the prime requisite for successful diversified farming is a good 
market. This market may be either a nearby town or a city, or 
a distant market which requires railroad transportation. In 
any case, however, the speed of transportation from farm to the 
unloading point is essential. Diversified fanning usually means 
a change from staple crops, such as corn and wheat, to more 
perishable products such as fruits and garden truck; that is 
to say, from crops which must be moved away from the farm 
immediately. The possibility of this change is largely de- 
pendent upon road conditions. 

"A farmer 10 miles from a market for spring truck crops, 
such as rhubarb, peas and spinach, is at a great disadvantage 
if his market road is unimproved, and he may be totally unable 
to compete with the former the same distance from market 
in another direction on a good road. 

"About each market or shipping point there is a boundary 
line which incloses the area that can be cultivated profitably 
for delivery at that point. If this area is considered as bounded 
by a circle, it is not difficult to see that its size will depend upon 
road conditions. The profit to the farmer is determined by the 
difference between the production and transportation costs, and 
the selling prices. Production must cease when the transporta- 
tion costs wipe out the difference. 

"As one goes farther from market centers, one passes through 
successive zones of production, each of which contains fewer 
farm products because some products will not bear the addi- 
tional cost of transportation. With a good system of improved 
roads radiating from market centers it must follow, if all other 
things are equal, that the total area of farming land will in- 
crease, as well as the successive areas or zones capable of sup- 
porting diversified crops. The whole business of farming is 
sufficiently dependent upon weather conditions without the 
added uncertainty of road conditions." 



At the Jeffery Plant 

"The Thomas B. Jeffery Company, Kenosha, Wis., has one of 
the most complete plants for the manufacturing of automobiles 
both pleasure and truck in the United States," says Leon S. 
Greenebaum, vice-president of the Jeffery Auto Sales Com- 
pany, California distributors for the Jeffery cars. 

"My visit of a couple of weeks at the factory was a surprise. 
I had no idea of just what it really was. The company has 
twenty-eight acres under cover, and it took me a full day to 
walk through the factory on my investigation tour. The com- 
pany employs over two thousand men at the present time. 

"What was most striking was the high grade of men em- 
ployed. Not only in the office force, but all through the factory 
even down to the shipping department they are well paid, 
which makes the men happy and satisfied. 

"L. H. Bill, now in charge at the factory, and who is so well 
known in California, and especially in San Francisco, has made 
good. Everybody has nothing but praise for his management. 
He is thoroughly well liked, and in the short time that he has 
been at the head of the factory, he has dispensed with all the 
dead timber; that is, those who were not up to date, and now 
harmony reigns supreme in the entire plant. 

"While at the factory. I met Charles Schaeffer, head engi- 
neer, who had just returned from Europe. Schaeffer spends 
considerable time each year in Europe, going through the dif- 
ferent factories looking up new ideas, and also watching how the 
older ones are proving up. Schaeffer says that at the present 
time Europe is after the light durable car. The heavy cumber- 
some cars of former days are almost unknown except those that 
are doing second-hand duty. This is one of the strong features 
which Schaeffer brought back, and which is being incorpor- 
ated by the Jeffery Company in the new product. They are 
following out the idea of a light, practical, durable car to the 
letter, more so than other manufacturers," 



'Twas Ever Thus 

"Gus Williams has figured out that there are seven stages 
in the auto disease," says O. C. McFarland, of the Osen-Mc- 
Farland Auto Company, agents for the Mitchell cars. "Wil- 
liams says: There's no record of any serious desire on the part 
of a man until he arrives at the age when he may legally drive 
an automobile. Nothing counts up to that. The first stage is the 
autointoxication period, as it were. The malady is never 
fatal, however, for the second stage develops right on its heels. 
In this you gratify your obsession to ride by getting yourself 
invited to tour in a friend's car. The third stage finds you offer- 
ing to pay for the tires and gasoline if your neighbor takes you 
out. In the fourth stage you sit in the front seat and occasion- 
ally induce your friend, the auto owner, to let you drive where 
the traffic is not annoying. 

"The fifth stage is more serious, especially if you happen to 
be in the theatrical business. You develop a fierce antipathy 
toward Pullman palace car travel, and sometimes, when the 
'jumps' from city to city are not long, arrange to make them 
in rented autos. The sixth stage is the period of self-denial and 
parsimony. Your friends and acquaintances begin to point their 
fingers at you, for you are living tremendously cheap — econo- 
mizing and saving. The auto bug is whizzing through your 
capillaries at an alarming rate. You would not pay $5 for a 
one-carat diamond in this stage if you could not sell the jewel 
at an immense profit. 

"Then comes the seventh stage — that of final possession of a 
satisfying car, such as my Mitchell Six. You wish to remain 
in this stage all your life. I'm living in the seventh stage, and 
will take my car with me to every city I have an engagement." 



Russian Tire Here 

Another fine make of tire has entered the California market. 
It is known as the Prowodnik, and is manufactured by a Rus- 
sian Company, which works at Riga, Russia. This line is 
handled by Reese & Son, of New York, who have opened a 
large office at Los Angeles for the distribution of the Russian 
product on the Pacific Coast. 



AUTO OWNERS 

Why take chances on your Ignition? Insist on using 

RAJAH PLUGS 



Do you know Rajah Plugs cost 
supply-houses three times as much 
as the cheap ordinary plugs? 

Some reason for their boosting the 
plug which pays them the long 
profit. 

Why are all these plugs similiar in 
appearance to the "Rajah?" 

They all know that 

Rajah MEANS Quality" 

Insist on the Genuine 

Hughson & Merton, inc. 



580 Golden Gate Ave. 



San Fram-isco 



January 10, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



Touring Cars 
Runabouts 

Town Cars - 



Autos Here to Stay 

"Motor cars are becoming less and less 
instruments of sport — more and more in- 
struments of utility. They are settling 
down to their broader and more useful 
function of rapid and convenient trans- 
portation for business or pleasure. The 
craze for speed is giving way to a more 
practical demand for economical and re- 
liable service. The light and medium- 
powered machine for city and country 
use is vastly in the majority," says 
Henry D. McCoy, of Chanslor & Lyon 
Company. 

"With this wide-spread tendency to- 
wards a more useful and less expensive operation of motor 
cars, the tire question is certain to become acute. There is 
a demand for something more dependable than pneumatics, 
with all their trouble and expense. It is estimated that fully 
75 per cent of the cost of running the average motor car is used 
up in tires. This is an extravagant tax. Three thousand five 
hundred miles is a high average for the life of a pneumatic tire, 
and the limit of its maker's guarantee. How inadequate this 
is will be apparent when you consider that five thousand miles 
is a very moderate annual performance for any gasoline car. 
This means at least a full set of tires every year, to say noth- 
ing about the extra tubes and casing. 

"And this is not all. A puncture or a blowout may happen 
at any time. Sometimes it may be easily repaired — at other 
times the injury wrought is either beyond repair or is so seri- 
ous that considerable money must be spent in restoring it. 

"Embarrassing delays on the road, your car out of commis- 
sion when you need it, a constant feeling of insecurity when 
driving at any distance from home, are too common incidents 
in motoring experience to need comment. They all result from 
pneumatic tires. 

"As standard equipment for the great bulk of motor cars, 




PACIFIC KISSEL- KAR BRANCH 

Van Nesi and Golden Gate Aves., San Francisco 

We Sell on Easy Terms 
Standard Models 

Prices F. O. B. Factory. 
Model- 



Price 

- BOO 

750 



AMERICAN 



American Motors California Co. 

476-482 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco 

Prices K. 0. it. Factory 

Models prices 

128 i Cylinder, 2 Pai 30 a. r. % 1550 

642 Cylinder, 2 Passenger 60 H. P. 2750 

644 6 Cylinder, 4 Passenger 60H.P. 2760 

646 6 Cylinder, 6 Passenger BOH. P. 2960 



pneumatics are certain to be displaced by some form of tire 
combining easy riding with a construction which is proof 
against puncture trouble. 

"That tire has already been invented, and is now being suc- 
cessfully used under thousands of gasoline and electric cars 
of all descriptions. Ninety per cent of all electrics are to-day 
being equipped with the Motz Cushion tires. It has all of the 
resiliency of pneumatics properly inflated, and is just as effi- 
cient; can be used to even greater advantage under a gas car 
driven at ordinary speed. Only in speeding and for racing 
purposes is the pneumatic to be preferred, and then it must be 
loosely inflated. 

"Doubtless for any purpose a softly inflated pneumatic is 
the most resilient, but for every-day use, how many motor car 
owners can afford to run with softly inflated tires? The ex- 
pense would be prohibitive. Softly inflated pneumatic tires 
wear out and rim-out in no time. 

"When properly inflated, the pneumatic is no easier riding 
than the Motz Cushion Tire. This is demonstrated not only 
theoretically by a study of construction, but also by the experi- 
ence of thousands of motor car owners who have tried both 
kinds." 



If you want to prolong the life 
of your engine, 

If you want to eliminate smoke 
and carbon, 
i> * rr\ j—* t If you want to reduce your oil 

MoloKoL ■•— ■ 

Uae MoToRoL 
"It suits because It doesn't soot" 

Hughson & Merton, Inc. 

530 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 


There is nothing in Goodrich Advertising 
that isn't in Goodrich Goods 

Goodrich SL Tires 

Best in the Long Run 

There are forty-three years of experience in 
rubber manufacturing in every Goodrich Tire 

THE B. F. GOODRICH COMPANY 

Everything that's best in Rubber 
341-847 Market Street San Francisco 

Loa Angeles Oakland Fresno Sacramento 


LIGHT YOUR AUTOMOBILE WITH THE 

DYNETO Automatic Electric Lighting System 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 
Pacific Com Ajents 
630 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 
CALL AND SEE DEMONSTRATION 


AUTO FENDER & RADIATOR WORKS 

Make and Repair 

Fenders, Radiators. Hoods, Metal Bodies, Tanks, 

Dash Shields, Lamps, Mud Pans, Tool 

Boxes, Metal Spinning, Etc. 

466 Golden Gate Ave. 32-34 Van Ness Ave. 

Phone Franklin 6460 Phone Market 6409 


Full factory equipment on all Pack- 

1 1 j, ,-.,-.. . CDH aril. OUsmoMles. Coles, Thomas and 

HU l\ cK Stvcn others. Absolutely perfect. 

Full set of four -$u to SiS. Under 

AIIXII IARY SPRINn & compression by heavy loads, rough 

AUAILIAKI OrrurNVJ Oi ro .dj or bumps. Under all conditions 

rides as easy as on asphalt. Impos- 
SHOCK ABSORBER slele to break springs. No competition 

HOOVER SPRING CO. 
6i' Turk St.. San Francisco 


PEART & ELKINGTON 

VULCANIZING Z' TV™ 

42 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 


Machinists and Engineers 
IV C CM AM DDHC Automobile Repairing a Specialty 

lS.cc IN A IN DrvUo. )SO Goli ,„ c .„ A< „„, „„ Hyd , 

and Latkln Streets 
Phones: Franklin Ma). Hesaa J mis 


FREE FROM CARBON 
PANHARD L. H. A B.I. BILL 
^~v t t 543 Golden Gate Ave. 
^— * J- J— 1 San Francisco. Cal. 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 10, 1914. 



Bulck Wins 

The latest Buick triumph is the winning of the highest honors 
in the recent 500 miles reliability run, completed at New York 
City recently. In many respects this was the hardest test that 
motor cars have ever been put through in this country, for not 
only were the cars penalized for lateness at control, but for 
chassis trouble and also for defective equipment and work of 
any nature done on the road. This is the first time cars entered 
in a reliability run have been penalized for electric starting and 
lighting systems, also the first time that tire trouble has been 
taken into account in making the score for a technical test. 
Besides these other subjects for penalization was speedometer, 
horn, spring, tire weight, baggage weight, battery storage, air 
tanks, and in fact every bolt, nut and screw used in the car, ex- 
cepting top and windshield. All kinds of tests were made at 
the end of the run to see that cars were in as good condition as 
when they started. In this contest the Buick cars carried off 

the honors in a most convincing way. 

* * * 

Poppet Valves 

"For seve r al years the motoring world has seemed to feel 
that the conventional poppet valve motor was destined to give 
way to some other type, notwithstanding the fact that the pro- 
duction of poppet valve type of automobile motors has each 
year been more than ten times that of all other types," says 
George Weidely, designer of the Premier car, who was the 
first engineer in the world to adopt shaft drive in his stock cars. 
This same designer is exhibiting in the Premier car at the New 
York Show a new motor which promises to become an import- 
ant factor not only in its claims to give more than 75 per cent 
more mileage from a gallon of gasoline, but its ability to suc- 
cessfully handle low grade gasoline, which adds to its attrac- 
tiveness. This motor is of the poppet valve type, but differs 
materially from the conventional poppet valve. While the 
same principles which have proven their worth in all the best 
cars in the world are employed, the application is wholly dif- 
ferent. ' 

* * * 

Borland Electric Gear 

The Borland Electric Worm Bevel Gear is not a worm gear, 
neither is it a bevel gear, but a worm bevel gear wherein is 
combined the best features of both the worm and the bevel, 
with the result that the Borland Electric Worm Bevel Gear will 
create a sensation in automobile circles that will make this new 
drive the most talked of drive that has ever been put in any 

electric propelled automobile. 

* * * 

New House Magazine 

"The Complete Motorist," privately printed and issued to the 
followers of America's cleanest sport, is out. Elwood Haynes, 
builder of America's first car, is the author. It contains a brief 
history of the life and inventions of Elwood Haynes, followed 

by a minute description of the Haynes car in two chapters. 

* * * 

Marmon at Show 

An especially interesting feature of the Nordyke & Marmon 
Company exhibit at the Automobile Show at the Grand Central 
Palace, is the five-passenger "Forty-One" touring car. This new 
model is attracting wide attention in automobile circles every- 
where. Many motor car owners and enthusiasts have made long 
journeys to the Indianapolis factory, just to inspect the new 
model. The Marmon "41," which is given its first public ex- 
hibition at the show, is painted dark maroon, with mouldings, 
fenders, tool box and side shields in black. 

* * * 

Goodrich New Tuhe 

The Goodrich Tire Company has just put on the market a 
new Indian inner tube. The Goodrich people are now offering 
a splendid tube. It is slightly heavier in construction than a 
Gray's tube, which is well known for quality. There is more 
toughness and bounce in the new tube than is generally found 
in the ordinary red tubes. 

* * * 

New Carburetor Adjuster 

E. H. French, representing the Whitman Motor Appliance 
Company of Medford, Oregon, is in San Francisco. He has 
come south to introduce the Whitman Carburetor, a device 
manufactured by his firm, and one which is claimed a great 
saving in fuel consumption. 



" *Y<? HlpL^O CfS</j<.Tf CtHpyff V just THE 

cfJe Y©i/ vifjiiT. 

M , w % fir " 




Phone Sutter 300 



Pacific Sightseeing Co., Prop. 



FOURTH ST. GARAGE 

FOURTH & HARRISON STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Commercial Trucks Automobile 

A Specialty Supplies 

The attention of owners of pleasure cars living In San Mateo 
County Is called to the convenience of this Garage to Third 
and Townsend Street Depot. 

THE LARGEST GROUND FLOOR FIREPROOF GARAGE WEST OF CHICAGO 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

Call on us when you want photographs of any kind. 
We can and will please you. Our new studio, the 
largest west of New York, covers 9,000 square feet of 
floor space, and Is completely equipped for every branch 
of our business. You are cordially invited to call and 
we will be very glad to take you through the different 
departments, portrait, commercial, copying, enlarging, 
Kodak, etc. You will be interested. 

ARTHUR SPAULDING CO., 
Everything in Modern Photography. 

625-633 Eddy St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Phones— Franklin 1184. Home C 4084. 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft and Transportation 

While anywhere in United States, Canada and Europe 



/ETNA INSURANCE CO. 



OF HARTFORD 
PACIFIC BRANCH— 32S California Street, 



San Francitco 



Tips to Automobilists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 
The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide: 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
SAN JOSE.— Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for flrst-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlors for ladles In connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE.— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North *irst street. The best French 
dinner in California, 76 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

PALO ALTO.— PALO ALTO GARAGE, 443 Emmerson St. Tel., P. A. 
333. Auto livery at all hours. Tires and sundries In stock. Gasoline, oil, 
repairing, lathework, vulcanizing. Open day and night. 



January 10, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



27 




CORONACH. 

He is gone on the mountain 

He is lost to the forest, 
Like a summer-dried fountain, 

When our need was the sorest. 
The fount reappearing 

From the raindrops shall borrow 
But to us comes no cheering, 

To Duncan no morrow! 

The hand of the reaper 

Takes the ears that are hoary, 
But the voice of the weeper 

Wails manhood in glory. 
The autumn winds rushing 

Waft the leaves that are serest, 
But our flower was in flushing 

When blighting was nearest. 

Fleet foot on the correi, 

Sage counsel in cumber, 
Red hand in the foray, 

How sound is thy slumber! 
Like the dew on the mountain, 

Like the foam on the river, 
Like the bubble on the fountain, 

Thou art gone ; and for ever ! 



—Sir W. Scott. 



UPON WESTMINSTER BRIDGE. 
Earth has not anything to show more fair : 
Dull would he be of soul who could pass by 
A sight so touching in its majesty; 
This City now doth like a garment wear 

The beauty of the morning : silent, bare, 
Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie 
Open unto the fields, and to the sky, 
All bright and glittering in the smokeless air. 

Never did sun more beautifully steep 
In his first splendor valley, rock, or hill; 
Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep! 

The river glideth at his own sweet will: 
Dear God! the very houses seem asleep; 
And all that mighty heart is lying still! 

— W. Wadsworth. 



OZYMANDIAS OF EGYPT. 
I met a traveler from an antique land 
Who said : Two vast and trunkless legs of stone 
Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand 
Half sunk, a shatter'd visage lies, whose frown 
And wrinkled lips and sneer of cold command 
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read 
Which yet survive, stamp'd on these lifeless thing;; 
The hand that mock'd them and the heart that fed ; 
And on the pedestal these words appear : 
"My name is Ozymandias, king of kings : 
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!'' 
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay 
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare, 
The lone and level sands stretch far away. 

—P. B. Shelley. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. (Adierttoement) 



. ~ A ™ an who cloth es no one but himself has only himself 
to suit. — Ex. 

t TTu 00 , y x° U ev f r weep over a stor y ? " "Sometimes, when 
1 get it back from the publishers."— Houston Post. 

, .,~"W. h u at ' s most Iiable t0 get broke about your automo- 
bile? The owner, replied Mr. Chuggins.-Washington Star. 

- 'There's a young woman who makes little things count." 

schcll ?-Ex lt? " " Teaches aritl ™etic in a primary 

Another good thing about being a vegetarian is that when 

the price of hen eggs is prohibitive one can eat the nests — 
Dallas News. 

"He is one of those near-vegetarians." "What is a near- 

vegetanan?" "He never eats meat except when he is invited 
out. — Houston Post. 

——"Did your husband have any luck on his hunting trip?" 
Splendid! Didn't you hear?" "No, what was it?" "He got 
back alive." — Houston Post. 

„ " Tn e elephant is mad at the camel." "What for?" 

"Why, Humpty woke him up out of a nice nap to ask if he had 
time to carry a trunk." — Ex. 

"And did you ever seek the man?" we asked the Office 

"Once or twice," replied the Office; "but I found him waiting 
outside my door." — Cincinnati Enquirer. 

The boy stood on the burning deck, 

Upon his face a frown. 
'Twas hot to stand upon that wreck, 
But hotter sitting down. — Ex. 

Counsel for the Defense (to client who has been dozing 

during the verdict)— Wake up and get out. You're acquitted. 
The Accused — Lor' lumme. Wot ! Not guilty ? — Sydney Bul- 
letin. 

"You can't fool all the people all the time," announced 

the Investigator. "I know it," replied the Trust Magnate; 
"there is plenty of profit in fooling half of them half the time." 
— Cincinnati Enquirer. 

Small Boy— Mamma, is it really true that the devil has 

horns and a club foot? Mother — Ah, my dear, sometimes the 
devil appears in the shape of a very handsome and charming 
young man. Boy (pityingly)— Oh, mummy! You're thinking 
of Cupid. — Punch. 

• "Some of your constituents are disagreeing with you," 

said the trusted lieutenant. "Well, keep tab on them," replied 
Senator Sorghum; "when enough disagree with me to constitute 
a reliable majority, I'm going to turn around and agree with 
them." — Washington Star. 

A large, slouchy colored man went shuffling down the 

road whistling like a lark. His clothes were ragged and his 
shoes were out at toes and heels, and he appeared to be in the 
depths of poverty for all his mirth. As he passed a prosperous- 
looking house, a man stepped from the doorway and hailed him. 
"Hey, Jim ! I got a job for you. Do you you want to make a 
quarter?" "No, sah," said the ragged one; "I done got a quar- 
ter." — Everybody's Magazine. 

The young men of the town- had bought the vacant lot 

opposite Miss Martha Billingsby's "fashionable school for 
young ladies," purposing to build a clubhouse thereon. "I am 
sorry for you," said one of Miss Martha's friends; "I fear hav- 
ing those young men opposite you, instead of that empty lot, 
will seriously injure your school." "Oh, never fear," answered 
Miss Martha promptly; "I can assure you that it wrll still be an 
empty lot." — Neale's Monthly. 



Dr. Agnew, rectal diseases. Pacific Building. 4th and Market street*. 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 10, 1914. 



Wh. 



erever you go 



asl 



k for 



BUFFALO BREWING CO.'S 

LAGER BEER 

On Draught and in Bottles 
at Most First-Class Dealers. 



NEUHAUS & COMPANY 

MERCHANT TAILORS 

N a t w 133 Kearny Street Bet s^lnd n F C io S oV tter 
To make you acquainted with our new location we will 
make you one of our $35.00 Suits or Overcoats to order 
for $20.00. Fit Guaranteed or No Sale. 
Phone Kearny 5938 (Formerly 506 Market St., S. F., Cal.) 



Telephont Kearny I461 Private Exchange Connecting All Warehouses 

SAN FRANCISCO WAREHOUSE CO. 

Warehousemen Forwarding Agents Distributors Public Weighers 

Spur Trick Connections With All Riilroids 

Main Office: 625-647 Third Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



SUMMONS. 
Justices' Court, F No. 33 

IN THE JUSTICES' COURT OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN 
STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 

Action brought in the Justices' Court 
in the City and County of San Fran- 
Cisco, and Complaint filed in the office 
of Clerk of said Court. 



EDWARD W. 



FRANCISCO. 
GUNTHER. 
Plaintiff 



E. M. CHADBOURNE, 

Defendant 



THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA TO E. M. CHAD- 
BOURNE. 

YOU ARE HEREBY DIRECTED to appear in action brought against 
you by the above named Plaintiff in the Justices' Court of the City and 
County of San Francisco, and to answer to the complaint filed therein; 
within five days (exclusive of the day of service) after the service on you 
of this summons, if served within this County, otherwise within twenty 
days. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you appear and answer as above 
required the said plaintiff will take judgment for any money or damages 
demanded in the Complaint, as arising upon contract, or plaintiff will 
apply to the Court for any other relief demanded in the Complaint. 

This action has been assigned, and you are directed to appear before 
Bernard J. Flood. Esq., one of the Justices of said Court, at his office. 
City Hall, Market street, between 8th and 9th streets, in said Citv and 
County. 

Make legal service and due return hereon: By order nf the Presiding Jus- 
tice of the Peace of the City and County of S:m Francisco. 

Given under my hand this December 18, 1913. 
EDWARD W. GUNTHER. 
Law and Collection Office, 
Kohl Building. Fifth Floor, 
Cor. Montgomery and California Sts. 

San Francisco. ROBERT W. DENNIS. Justices' Clerk 

Attorney for Plaintiff. By J. F. COLLINS. Deputy Clerk 



VALUABLE NEWSPAPER INFORMATION 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau 

88 FIRST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 
Phones: Kearny 392 J 1538 

CLIPPINGS OF ANYTHING YOU WISH 



BUZZELL ELECTRIC WORKS 

543-545 Sansome Street 
Motors and armatures repaired and rewound. Gen- 
eral machine work and all kinds of electrical equipment 
repaired. We buy, rent, exchange and Inspect motors. 
Phone Douglas 3373 Night Phone Mission 3128 



BRUSHES 



623 Sacramento Street, between 
Kearny and Montgomery Streets 



With full line of Brushes. Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 

to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders. Buckets, Chamois. Metal 

Polish and Cleaning Powders. Hardware. Wood and Willow Ware. 

Call, write or telephone Kearny 5787 

WM. BUCHANAN 




A Cogent Philosopher. 

The philosophers are usually a gloomy tribe, so that it is 
pleasant and encouraging to discover one like Herbert Quick 
whose inspiring parable is written in a happy vein of optimism, 
illuminated by a pleasant humor. He calls this parable or 
allegory, "The Good Ship Earth" (Bobbs-Merrill, price $1.25 
net), with an explanatory subtitle, "A Survey of World Prob- 
lems." 

It is an ambitious work that Mr. Quick has undertaken, deal- 
ing with the land question in the vein of Henry George and the 
population question in a manner which, although not altogether 
original, is impressive and instructive. The preface to the book 
is written by Professor Edward Alesworth Ross, formerly of 
Stanford, and now of the University of Wisconsin, who gives 
Mr. Quick's theories his highest endorsement. 

Current ideas on the subject of population are gently satirized 
by Mr. Quick, where he tells us that "increase of population is 
usually regarded as a good thing. We Americans are especially 
prone to think of a growing population as a good thing. We 
strive to attract people to our States, our cities, our towns. We 
stuff local census figures sometimes to show growth where we 
have had none. We hide our heads in shame when the statistics 
show a loss of population or a gain supposed to be too small." 

All this is very well, but Mr. Quick takes up the other side 
of the population, and tells us that "to find the places where 
the earth is really overpopulated one must go to the Orient — 
to China, Japan, Korea and India. And here, where the popu- 
lation presses on subsistence, we find what we shall one day find 
in these States of ours if the universal law of multiplication 
goes on unchecked. We find squalor unspeakable, misery in- 
describable, fear in the heart of every man and four-fifths of 
the thoughts of every mind and of the utterances of every 
mouth related to food." 

That is to say, Mr. Quick does not agree with Roosevelt. He 
is not frightened by a declining birth rate, and on the whole, 
within limits, regards it as a good thing. In fine, he accepts 
as desirable that equilibrium of births and deaths which Her- 
bert Spencer describes as the ultimate result of race develop- 
ment. 



Some Book Notes. 

The second in the series of books published for the Bureau 
of Social Hygiene by The Century Co., Abraham Flexner's 
"Prostitution in Europe," will be issued January 17th. Mr. Flex- 
ner's book is based on several months' careful study in the 
large cities abroad; and, it is said, will clear up the widespread 
misapprehension prevailing as to the policies pursued by Euro- 
pean cities, and their results. 

Helen Keller, who is lecturing with her teacher, Mrs. Macy, 
throughout the country this winter, says that her idea of beauty 
is expressed in her book, "The Song of the Stone Wall." 

The Century Co.'s early 1914 fiction issues will include "Wil- 
liam and Bill," a study of boy life by Grace MacGowan Cook 
and Caroline Wood Morrison, and "Home," the novel whose 
anonymous serial publication in The Century Magazine is arous- 
ing such interest. 

Royal Cortissoz, as his title, "Art and Common Sese" (Scrib- 
ners) indicates, also writes in full sympathy with the layman. 
The volume includes essays on divers topics : Ingres, Rembrant, 
Hals,' Vermeer, Whistler, Sargent, Alfred Stevens, Rodin, Mor- 
ris Hunt, etc. Though that common sense which the author ad- 
vocates binds them all together, it does not prevent them from 
being exceedingly entertaining and bright. There are certain 
ones of particular interest to such as do not usually take to art 
subjects. For instance, "J. P. Morgan as an Art Collector," 
"Four leaders in American Architecture" (Richardson, Hunt, 
McKim, and Burnham), "The Post-Impressionist Illusion," and 
the first article, which gives title to the book. 

Gordon Arthur Smith, the author of "Mascarose" (Scribners), 
a story of the middle ages, in which the veins of romance, satire 



January 10, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



29 



and poetry delightfully blend, is the son of the author of "The 
Monk and the Dancer," "The Turquoise Cup," etc. He is a 
young Harvard graduate, of the class of 1908, and until recently 
he has been studying architecture in Paris. 

"From the Porch," a new volume of essays of a reminiscent 
character, by Lady Ritchie, Thackeray's eldest daughter, has 
just been issued by Charles Scribner's Sons. In them she re- 
counts meetings with many of the literary figures of the Vic- 
torian era, including Dickens, Carlyle and George Eliot. She 
is best known as an author under the name of Miss Thackeray, 
and has written over a dozen volumes of novels, tales and bio- 
graphical essays. Some of her best known novels are "Old 
Kensington," "The Village of the Cliff" and "The Story of Eliz- 
abeth." She excels in delicate and thoughtful portraiture of 
character, and her stories are also notable for their caustic 
and shrewd comments on life and conduct. Her books have 
been popular, and she has won quite a following for herself 
in this country, which will welcome any new volume from her 
pen. The title of the volume signifies familiar reminiscences 
and recollections spoken or written on the porch of a cottage be- 
longing to Lady Ritchie at Freshwater on the Isle of Wight, a 
picture of which appears in the volume. 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



Experiences of Joseph Pulitzer. 

An interesting anecdote of Joseph Pulitzer's early days, 
which he told with great relish, related to his experience as fire- 
man on a Mississippi ferry boat. His limited knowledge of 
English was regarded by the captain as a personal affront, 
and that fire-eating old timer made it his particular business 
to let young Pulitzer feel the weight of his authority. At last 
the overwork and the constant bullying drove Mr. Pulitzer into 
revolt, and he left the boat after a violent quarrel with the cap- 
tain. Whenever Mr. Pulitzer reached this point in the story, and 
I heard him tell it several times, his face lighted up with 
amusement, and he had to stop until he had enjoyed a good 
laugh. 

"Well, my God!". he would conclude, "about two years later, 
when I had learned English, studied some law and been made 
a notary public, this very same captain walked into my office in 
St. Louis one day to have some documents sealed. As soon 
as he saw me he stopped short as if he had been shot, and said : 
'Say, ain't you the damned cuss that I fired off my boat?' 

"I told him that I was. He was the most surprised man I 
ever saw, but after he had sworn himself hoarse he faced the 
facts and gave me his business." 

Perhaps the most characteristic of all Mr. Pulitzer's stories 
about himself was one relating to an occurrence which took 
place after he had become editor and part proprietor of the 
Westliche Post. He had given great offense to a certain judge 
in St. Louis, and the latter declared one day from the bench 
that before the sun set he would seek out Pulitzer and shoot 
him down like a dog. If my memory serves me, Mr. Pulitzer 
was in court when this threat was made — in any case it came 
to his ears — and he immediately issued an "Extra" announcing 
the proposed assassination, and stating that he would remain 
in his office until the setting of the sun in order that no hitch 
might occur in the program. — Alleyne Ireland in the January 
Metropolitan. 



Rex Beach, author of "The Iron Trail," is now suffering, 

it seems, one of the penalties which lie in wait for those who 
achieve fame — the possession of a double. Recently his pub- 
lishers received the following telegram sent from the South: 
"Rex Beach has been arrested here. Is drunk. Tell us if it is 
Rex Beach." The reply read: "Rex Beach here. Says he is 
not drunk and not in Alabama." The literary activities of this 
impersonator took the form of four-leaf checks which he "auto- 
graphed" with Rex Beach's name. 



OF EXTRAORDINARY INTEREST. 

The Christmas News Letter has for many years been antici- 
pated with pleasure by its exchanges as well as its readers. 
The 1913 number is one of extraordinary interest. It is beauti- 
fully illustrated and well edited, and its special and miscella- 
neous features are especially entertaining and instructive. It is 
a splendid number to send to an Eastern friend. — Woodland 
Democrat. 



SNELL SEMINARY 

Has Moved to 

2237 PIEDMONT AVE., BERKELEY 

Boarding and day School. 
Founded 1874. From pri- 
mary to college entrance, 

ADELAIDE SMITH 

PRINCIPAL 



Hitchcock Military Academy 

SAN RAFAEL, CAL. 

THE ONLY SCHOOL IN THE WEST HAVING 
SEPARATE ROOMS FOR EACH BOY 

Accredited; Large Campus Gymnasium, Indoor 
Rifle Range.Cadets may enter any time of the 
year. Summer camp on Eel River, June to 
August. 

Principals 
REX W. SHERER S. J. HALLEY 



Miss Harker's School PA C L ° F0 A R L J A 

Boarding and Day School (or Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mills. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nurse 
for younger children. Ninth year. 

Catalogue upon application. 



A. W. Beift 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1626 California Street 



Ufa Cla 

Day and Nlirht 



llluatr&tlna: 
Sketohlnr 
Painting- 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged ; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavla. Telephone Park 2940. 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgeon of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.: 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevius, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy St., now at room 403 
Westbank Building, corner Ellis and Market. 

ATTORNEYS* AT- LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building, San Pran- 
cisc o. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dr. R. T. Leaner, Surgeon Chiropodist, formerly of 6 Geary street; 
removes corns entirely whole — painless — without knife. Bunions and in- 
growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 212-214 West- 
bank Bldg.. 830 Market St. Tel. Kearny 3578. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public and Pension Attorney. All legal 
papers drawn up accurately. 217 Montgomery St. above Bus-b. San Fran- 
cisco. Cal Phone Dou*laa (S01 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER 



37-45 First Street Phono Sutter 223C 

Private Exchange Connecting All Dapartmants 



30 




San Francisco News Letter 

•■■■ ■■■•■ | 



January 10, 1914. 



r'V 1 ■ 



The New Poodle Dog 



HOTEL 

and 
RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: Franklin 2960 Home C 6705 





MAISON DOREE 

HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

l".l-li7 Ellis Street IT Glasgow Stree 

Phono Douglas MHO 

TRY OUR SPECIAL 

50c 4-COURSE QUICK LUNCHEON 

With Claret, or Glass of Beer, Tea or Coffee 

From n a. m. to 2 p. m. 

OUR SI. 00 DINNERS ARE, POSITIVELY 
THE BEST IN TOWN 



BLANCO'S 



O'Farrell and Larkin 
Streets 



Phone Franklin 8 

No visitor should leave the city without seeing the 
finest cafe in America 



Sutter 1672 
Horn* C 3970 
Home C 4781. Hotel 



Cyril Arnanton 
Henry Rlttman 
C. Lahederne 



NEW DELMOIMICO'S 

(FORMERLY MAISON TORTONI) 
RESTAURANT AND HOTEL NOW OPEN 

Best French Dinner In the City with Wine. Ii.oo. Banquet Hells end Private 

Dining Rooms. Music Every Evening. 
362 Geary Street San Franclaco 



J. B. Pod 



J. Berges 



C. Meilhebusu 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old POODLE DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT EVERY EVENING 

415-421 Bush St.. Sea Francisco (Above Kearay) Eichaaae. Douglas 1411 




FOR AFTER THEATRE SPECIALTIES 
(Eabarrt Ip IGuxp 

Highest Class Entertainment in San 
Francisco. 20 Star Entertainers 



French and Italian Dinners, With 
Wine, $1.00, also a la Carte. 

MASON AND EDDY STREETS 

Phones: Sutter 3739 Kearny 1628 




Senator Catron of New Mexico has made a personal investi- 
gation of conditions in Mexico, and he is convinced that inter- 
vention by the United States is inevitable. Senator Catron 
is a member of the committee on military affairs, and he admits 
that the United States army as at present constituted is in no 
condition to invade a foreign country. He estimates that we 
should acquire an army of 200,000 men to take care of the 
Mexican situation. He is quoted: 

"The conditions in Mexico are worse than they were in 
Cuba when we intervened in that island in behalf of 
humanity. In Mexico at the present time there is more 
human suffering, there has been greater loss of life and a 
greater amount of property destroyed than in Cuba pre- 
vious to the war of 1898. And most of that property in 
Mexico belonged to citizens of the United States. Few 
Americans lost their lives in Cuba before the Spanish war, 
and but little property belonging to the citizens of this 
country was destroyed during the insurrection in that 
island, but the loss of American lives in Mexico since the 
present disturbances began have been appalling. 

"While loss of property is a secondary consideration, it 
is a fact that two-fifths of the property of Mexico, amount- 
ing to something like $1,038,000,000 at the beginning of 
the present disturbances, has been destroyed or shrunk in 
values to less than one-third of its former value. If pres- 
ent conditions continue, or Mexico is at peace under con- 
ditions which will surely prevail until the United States in- 
tervenes, the property of Americans in Mexico is not worth 
ten millions." 

Francisco Villa, the bandit leader of the revolutionaries and 
constitutionalists, refuses all compromise with Huerta, and 
has issued a statement of the terms of settlement demanded 
by his following. These conditions are as follows : 

"The elimination of General Huerta and his supporters. 
The complete surrender to the constitutionalist cause of 
politicians now opposing it. The restoration of the consti- 
tution. The selection of a provisional president acceptable 
to the constitutionalists and provisions for a popular elec- 
tion. Guarantee for a change in the land laws so that deeds 
to land would be more generally distributed. Ratification 
of confiscation by the rebels of the vast Terrazas, Creel and 
other estate valued at many millions of dollars. Nullifica- 
tion of all acts of the Huerta regime." 

The resignation of Huerta would clarify the situation per- 
haps, but there is little expectation that he will take this course, 
and accordingly the constitutionalists will have to fight their 
way to the City of Mexico. 



A Topsy Turvy Situation. 

Ireland is still disturbed by the question: "Will Ulster 
fight?" As usual, in Irish affairs, there are elements of humor 
in the situation created by the strenuous opposition to home 
rule in the northern province. The humor is sometimes un- 
conscious, as for example, one finds a Tory newspaper jubi- 
lantly and triumphantly describing the preparations in Ulster 
to initiate a rebellion against the British crown. Thus the spe- 
cial correspondent of the London Express writes from Balfast : 

"Belfast he.', sent out to-night a fleet of motor cars to the 
four points of the Ulster compass. As I write, they are 
racing through the darkness and the driving sleet. In 
country towns, men are sitting up awaiting their arrival. 
Here and there in bleak and lonely places other men 
linger in the night watching for the headlights. These 
motor cars are laden with rifles and ammunition for the Ul- 
ster volunteers. They are 'gun-running' in the most ap- 
proved style, distributing arms all over the country, empty- 
ing the arsenals in Belfast as quickly as they can. 



January 10, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



"But the men engaged are blind to the romance of the 
affair. The Ulster Covenanter of today is very like the 
other Covenanters who raised the blue banner in the long 
ago. He is in deadly earnest. There is a task to be ac- 
complished, and he will go through with it in the same 
quiet, determined way that he goes about his daily work. 
He is incapable of imagining himself a hero. He would 
be gravely offended if told that he made a picturesque fig- 
ure in these drab modern days. The men are emptying the 
arsenals in Belfast because they think it extremely prob- 
able that the Crimes Act will be revived in the near future, 
and they are not disposed to see the work of many anxious 
months wasted. The whereabouts of the arsenals are known 
to comparatively few persons, but there is reason to believe 
that some agents of the Dublin Castle authorities have suc- 
ceeded in disguising themselves as Unionists and joined 
the volunteers to do espionage work." 

The correspondent goes on to describe in the approved fash- 
ion of Irish politics of whatever brand the odious machinations 
of the "castle spies" and the police. A dozen years ago the 
nationalists were declaiming in identical terms, but now the 
boot is on the other leg. No more funny inversion of politics 
has ever characterized the topsy-turvy Irish situation. 



Timber Land Prices. 

Timber land prices in British Columbia bear a certain relation 
to Californian markets, and in that view some information con- 
tained in a recent consular report will be of interest. It is re- 
lated that in New Westminster a sale was recently made of the 
largest tract of timberland that has been disposed of by the 
Dominion Government in British Columbia, when at public auc- 
tion timber berth No. 522, containing 4,428.8 acres, was pur- 
chased by a Vancouver lumberman for $13,083. A larger 
amount ($24,000) was paid by the same person about two 
years ago for a much smaller tract. The berth recently sold is 
situated on Spuzzum Creek, which empties into the Fraser 
River near Spuzzum, on the Canadian Pacific Railway. The 
berth is estimated to contain approximately 150,000,000 board 
feet of excellent fir and cedar, and the present financial strin- 
gency is considered responsible for the low selling price. The 
purchaser proposes to erect a sawmill on the tract and flume the 
lumber to the Canadian Pacific Railway, where a modern 
planing mill will be installed. This is said to be a new depart- 
ure in lumber manufacture in British Columbia. Loading facili- 
ties will be arranged with the Canadian Northern Railway and 
an overhead cable system will probably be used to transport the 
lumber across the Fraser River. 



Mothers' Pensions in British Columbia. 

British Columbia appears to keep abreast of sociological 
movements, and it is related by Consul Woodward of Vancou- 
ver that delegates from the social service commission of Vic- 
toria, British Columbia, recently laid before the labor com- 
mission at Victoria the economic advantages of the establish- 
ment of mothers' pensions. It was pointed out that some States 
in the United State, as well as a number of European countries, 
had adopted this law in some form or other. The delegation 
brought to the attention of the commission the fact that while 
the creche, an institution for the care of children during the 
day while the mother was employed, was of great value under 
present conditions, it was far better that the mother be given 
a pension sufficient to enable her to take in light work at her 
home and thus bring up her children to be valuable members 
of society instead of leaving them to the care of strangers dur- 
ing the time she is employed. 



REMARKABLE ILLUSTRATIONS. 
The Christmas number of the San Francisco News Letter is 
one of the most elaborate of holiday publications. Its illustra- 
tions of California scenes are remarkable for their number, 
selectness and excellence, and the literary features measure 
up to the News Letter's well known high standard. — San Jose 
Times. 




50 YEARS 

OF CONSTANTLY INCREASING 
POPULARITY HAVE CROWNED 
THE INFALLIBLE REPUTATION OF 

HUNTER 

BALTIMORE 

RYE 



Sold at al! first-class cafes and by jobbers. 
WM. LANAHAN & SON, Baltimore, Md. 



TAKE a 
TRIP 
TO and 
THROUGH the 

PANAMA CANAL 

THIS WINTER 



2 CRUISES 
February 28 March 17, 1914 

$125 and up 

Per S. S. "KRONPRINZESSIN CECILIE" 

Secure Rooms NOW 



OTHER PLEASURE CRUISES 

5 Panama Canal — West Indies from New York. 
S. S. "Cleveland" 93 days Orient— India Cruise. 
S. S. "Cleveland" 135 days Around-the-World Cruise. 



Handsomely Illustrated Pamplets Sent on Application 

Hamburg- American Line 

160 Powell Street San Francisco 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. (AdrarUMmmti 



MR. PROPERTY OWNER 

Have you not always some slight repairs? Stopped 
basins, broken window cords, electrical repair work? 
We will assume all your repairs at a small monthly 
rate. Our representative will call at your request 

Phoenix Repair Company 

Nevada Bank Bldg., 14 Montgomery St. Phone Douglat 822 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 10, 1914. 



STATEMENT 

of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

HIBERNIA BANK 

DATED DECEMBER 31, 1913 



ASSETS. 

1— Bonds of the United States ($5,050,000.00), 
of the State of California and Cities and 
Counties thereof ($5,867,275.00), of the 
State of New York ($951,000.00), the ac- 
tual value of which is $12,398,440.52 

2 — Cash in Vault: U. S. Gold and Silver 

Coin ....$2,778,507.92 

Checks .... 30,723.56 

2,809,231.48 

3— Miscellaneous Bonds ($5,408,000.00), the 

actual value of which is 5,419,229.33 



$20,626,901.33 
They are : 

"San Francisco and North Pacific Railway 
Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($476,000.00), 
"Southern Pacific Branch Railway Company 
of California 6 per cent Bonds" ($340,- 
000.00), "Southern Pacific Company, San 
Francisco Terminal 4 per cent Bonds" ($150,- 
000.00), "Western Pacific Railway Company 
5 per cent Bonds" ($213,000.00), "San Fran- 
cisco and San Joaquin Valley Railway Com- 
pany 5 per cent Bonds" ($30,000.00), "North- 
ern California Railway Company 5 per cent 
Bonds" ($83,000.00), "Northern Railway 
Company of California 5 per cent Bonds" 
($120,000.00), "Market Street Railway Com- 
pany First Consolidated Mortgage 5 per 
cent Bonds" ($728,000.00), "Los Angeles 
Pacific Railroad Company of California Re- 
funding 5 per cent Bonds" ($400,000.00), 
"Los Angeles Railway Company of Califor- 
nia 5 per cent Bonds" ($334,000.00), "The 
Omnibus Cable Company 6 per cent Bonds" 
($167,000.00), "Sutter Street Railway Com- 
pany 5 per cent Bonds" ($150,000.00), 
"Gough Street Railway Company 5 per cent 
Bonds" ($20,000.00), "Ferries and Cliff 
House Railway Company 6 per cent Bonds" 
($6,000.00), "San Francisco, Oakland and 
San Jose Railway Company 5 per cent 
Bonds" ($5,000.00), "The Merchants' Ex- 
change 7 per cent Bonds" ($1,400,000.00), 
"San Francisco Gas & Electric Company 4 1 2 
per cent Bonds" ($535,000.00), "Los Angeles 
Gas & Electiic Company 5 per cent Bonds" 
($100,000.00), "Spring Valley Water Com- 
pany 4 per cent Bonds" ($50,000.00), "Ger- 
man House Association 6 per cent Bonds" 
($101,000.00.) 
-Promissory Notes and the debts thereby se- 
cured, the actual value of which is 34,041,389.89 

The condition of said Promissory Notes 
and debts is as follows: They are all exist- 
ing Contracts, owned by said Corporation, 
and are payable to it at its office, which is 
situated at the corner of Market, McAllister 
and Jones streets, in the City and County of 
San Francisco, State of California, and the 
payment thereof is secured by First Mort- 
gages on Real Estate within this State and 



the States of Oregon and Nevada. Said 
Promissory Notes are kept and held by said 
Corporation at its said office, which is its 
principal place of business, and said Notes 
and debts are there situated. 

5 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby se- 
cured, the actual value of which is 484,780.00 

The condition of said Promissory Notes 
and debts is as follows : They are all existing 
Contracts, owned by said Corporation, and 
are payable to it at its office, which is situ- 
ated as aforesaid, and the payment thereof is 
secured by pledge and hypothecation of 
Bonds of Railroad and Quasi-Public Corpora- 
tions and other securities. 

6' — (a) — Real Estate situated in the City and 
County of San Francisco ($1,936,214.49), and 
in the County of Santa Clara ($12,647.44), in 

this State, the actual value of which is 1,948,861.93 

(b) The Land and Building in which said 
Corporation keeps its office, the actual value 

of which is 983,288.50 

The condition of said Real Estate is that it 
belongs to said Corporation, and part of it is 
productive. 

7 — Interest on Loans and Bonds — uncollected 

and accrued 213,580.10 

TOTAL ASSETS $58,298,801.75 



LIABILITIES. 
I — Said Corporation Owes Deposits amount- 
ing to and the actual value of which is. . . .$54,474,351.04 
(Number of Depositors, 85,185. 
Average amount of Deposits, $d39.48.) 
2 — Contingent Funds — Accrued In- 
terest on Loans and Bonds $213,580.10 

3— Reserve Fund, Actual Value . . .. 3,610,870.61 

: 3,824,450.71 



TOTAL LIABILITIES $58,298,801.75 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
By CHARLES MAYO, President. 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
By R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA, 

City and County of San Francisco — ss. 

CHARLES MAYO and R. M. TOBIN, being each duly 
sworn, each for himself, says: That said CHARLES MAYO is 
President and that said R. M. TOBIN is Secretary of THE 
HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, the corpora- 
tion above mentioned, and that the foregoing statement is true. 

CHARLES MAYO, President. 

R. M. BOBIN, Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2d day of January, 1914 

CHAS. T. STANLEY 
Notary Public in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California. 












The wild ass takes whafs left. 




C.UblUh.d July JO. l&M 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




Vol. LXXXVII 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, January 17, 1914 



No. 3 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 21 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3B94. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — S. L. Carman, representative, 156 Fifth Ave. 

Chicago Office — Jno. A. Tenney, 452 Peoples Gas Building, Chicago. 

Boston Office — Charles S. Parr, 525 Tremont Temple. 

London Office — George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Matter intended for publication in the current number of the SAN 
FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER should 

be sent to the office not later than 5 p. m. Wednesday. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) — 1 year, $4.00; 6 months, $2.26. 
Foreign — 1 year, $6.00; 6 months, $3.26. 



Most of the serious fighting between Mexican armies 

takes place close to the border, which looks like evidence of 
wisdom and a preference for an easy getaway across the line. 

Fred Magee, a Sacramento football hero of the high 

school team, with ready wit flabbergasted an inexperienced 
footpad by flattening an orange on the robber's nose, and in the 
resulting confusion made a successful run around the end. 

William Charles de Meuron Wentworth Fitzwilliam, 

commonly known as Earl Fitzwilliam in the British peerage, 
is an extensive landholder in Fresno County, and petitions the 
Board of Supervisors to close a road which is in his way or out 
of his way, as you please. Give his lordship anything he 
wants. It is a pleasure and an honor. 

Dr. Alonzo E. Taylor, professor of chemistry in the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, has reduced the fashions of women's 
dress to terms of science, and figures it out that when the ladies 
come out in thin or diaphanous clothing they must eat ten per 
cent more food. Hence the high cost of living. The slit skirt 
is first cousin to the price of eggs. 

In a controversy between the war department and the 

National Guard Association of the United States brings out the 
fact that the militia is top-heavy with major-generals and briga- 
diers. The war department insists that the States shall make 
up the full quota of the rank and file or retire the superfluous 
generals. The States mostly refuse to do either. The brigadiers 
may die, but they never surrender. 

The weather prophecy debate very naturally grows 

stormy, and the padres are more or less politely disagreed, 
while Professor Leuschner, of the State University, occupies a 
safe and diplomatic roost on top of the fence, refusing to act as 
referee of the scientific contest. But the innocent bystander, if 
bewildered by the flow of astronomical lore, is yet capable of 
realizing that Father Ricard has the punch. 

California is a State of magnificent distances. A San 

Bernardino paper states that "at least one hundred miles of the 
boundary line of the two counties (San Bernardino and River- 
side) on the desert east of the San Bernardino mountains, has 
never been established since the division of the two counties 
years ago. "Until recently, the only question that could arise 
over the floating boundary was the jurisdiction of the Coroner. 



Not long ago the daily papers printed sensational front 

page stories about the invention of a so-called "wireless eye" 
which enabled people to see in the dark and do other astonish- 
ing stunts, the other day the inventor was arrested in Oakland 
on a charge of swindling by selling stock in an ingenious opti- 
cal illusion. 

The eternal tinkering with the election laws, most of it 

frivolous or futile, makes the voter dizzy keeping track of the 
changes. Among other electoral novelties and fashions, it ap- 
pears that after April 1st, only those who have registered this 
year will be qualified to sign initiative or nominating petitions, 
and there is some doubt as to whether any are now qualified to 
sign such petitions unless they have registered since January 
1st. 

The Palo Alto Citizen announces that "a movement that 

it is believed will result in the upheaval of the Oneal machine 
in San Jose and Santa Clara County will be a campaign in the 
county seat for the establishment of a commission form of gov- 
ernment." Here is a touching faith in the efficiency of govern- 
mental machinery to effect reforms. The assumption is that a 
political machine must wilt and fade away under the blistering 
light that shines from a municipal commission. Let us up- 
heave. 

A school book producing company, which supplies the 

texts used in the schools of California, after manufacture by the 
State, is compelled as a measure of self-defense to copyright 
its product in Japan, where it has been extensively pirated. 
The other day the San Francisco Customs House held up a 
shipment of California schotjl readers with Japanese interlinea- 
tions imported from Japan. As these books are contraband in 
the United States, and in Japan they seem to be between the 
Customs House and the deep sea. 

The Rev. Alfred Kummers, of the Central Methodist 

Church, rashly embarks on a poetic sea of metaphor to find 
"The Ideal Wife," and in the course of his perilous voyage, he 
finds that "when woman in her threefold relations as mother, 
wife and daughter shall form an indissoluble union with man 
as father, husband and son, then shall be fused a double trinity 
and a new era shall be born whose luster shall never fade." 
Respectfully referred to Judge Graham as the most eminent lay 
authority on the domestic relations. 

The Alameda County taxpayers association reports that 

Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley have wasted $70,148 on elec- 
tions in the past year. "In the city of Oakland," says the re- 
port, "every election out of twelve shows many items of inex- 
cusable extravagance." All this waste is done in the sacred 
name of the people's rule, but the fact is, that the people refuse 
to rule, and mostly stay away from the polls. What with the 
flagrant waste of money and the indifference of voters, it is not 
impossible that representative government now in well earned 
disgrace will come back to public favor. 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 17, 1914. 




Efforts made by the authorities of 
Individuality Among the University of California to in- 
College Women. troduce a system of co-operative 

buying and selling, with a purpose 
to reduce the cost of living for college women are now ac- 
knowledged to be a failure. Miss Lucy Ward Stebbins, dean 
of women, and Mrs. Myer E. Jaffa, wife of Professor Jaffa of 
the State food and drugs laboratory, and lecturer on dietetics, 
declare that the thing cannot be done. 

Undoubtedly material saving in the cost of food could be 
effected if the college women could be persuaded to unite on a 
general menu, but if everybody or a considerable proportion of 
everybody wants something different, the result is loss and not 
gain. The college women, according to Miss Stebbins, are too 
"individual" to agree on a common bill of fare. They hold, 
like other people that variety is the spice of living, whether the 
cost is high or low, and they positively object to having their 
meals standardized. That business ideal finds small accept- 
ance among the sororities. Miss Stebbins reports : 

"In connection with the women's house clubs and frater- 
nities, Mrs. Jaffa has conducted meetings of student house- 
managers with the somewhat dim hope that a system of co- 
operative buying might be evolved. At present, with the 
strong disposition toward individuality and variety, the 
difficulty of storage and delivery and the willingness of 
each group to pay a good price for the convenience offered 
by nearby retail dealers, it is not likely that any scheme 
can be made successful unless an expert is employed for 
the work of organization." 

There is besides a lack of organization among the college 
women which Miss Stebbins deplores. She reports, however, 
that there is a slowly increasing esprit de corps among them, 
and so far as housing the women students is concerned, she 
points to the college hall and the campus house as particularly 
successful experiments. 

3B- 

It is too soon yet to pass judg- 
Will Not Insure Miners, ment on the plan of insurance by 

the State to provide compensa- 
tion for accidental injury in the course of industry, but it ap- 
pears already to have developed defects in that it is a long way 
from covering the field. From a letter written by the State in- 
surance manager to a mine owner in Jackson, Amador County, 
it appears that the insurance department under his direction re- 
fuses to accept doubtful risks, and practically the most import- 
ant branches of mining are left uncovered. This letter was 
written to George A. Gritton, County Treasurer of Amador, who 
owns a gravel mine and is printed in the Jackson Ledger as 
follows : 

"Industrial Accident Board, Sacramento, December 22, 
1913. — Dear Sir: We have your letter of December 16th, 
and regret to advise you that we consider that tunnel work 
and underground mines present a catastrophe hazard which 
is beyond the safe carrying of the State, at least until we 
are in a position to complete arrangements for reinsurance. 
Very truly yours, C. W. Fellows, Insurance Manager." 

The conclusion is drawn from this letter that the State is 
looking after the cream only of the accident insurance business, 
leaving what remains to the outside companies, or will let the 
employees themselves stand the risk. Therefore, the Ledger 
asks: "If the people of California collectively shrink from as- 



suming the financial risk entailed by their own law, how can it 
be expected that the surety companies or the mining companies 
can afford to assume the burden?" In fact, the conclusion is 
compelled that, in the opinion of the State officials themselves, 
the Workmen's Compensation law, so far as the mining in- 
dustry is concerned, is unreasonable and oppressive." 



Our Growing Trade 
With Australia. 



San Francisco is building up an im- 
portant and steadily growing trade 
with Australia and New Zealand. 
Two years ago this city had no 
direct means of transportation for trade with the South Seas. 
Now there are two well-established and fully equipped lines 
of regular steamship communication, and the trade is con- 
stantly growing. A recent report by Consul General Bray of 
Sydney, N. S. W., quotes this passage : 

"Important features are contemplated in the Oceanic 
Steamship Co.'s new 10,000 ton steamer ordered for the 
Sydney trade. They will include a large roof garden, a 
children's nursery, gymnasium and elaborate accommo- 
dation for first, second and third class passengers. An- 
other important point about the new liner will be that she 
will be equipped with a refrigerating plant treble the ca- 
pacity of that now installed on the Sonoma and Ventura. 
The rapid increase of shipments of refrigerated meat and 
supplies from Australia to the United States is said to 
have caused the steamship directors much concern. The 
Sonoma and the Ventura are declared to possess but a lim- 
ited capacity for cold-storage cargoes." 

The chief significance of this news lies in the importance at- 
tached by the Oceanic Company to the enlargement of its re- 
frigerating plant, which points to a big and increasing trade in 
meats, butter and other perishable food products. That trade 
has already assumed considerable proportions, and it is certain 
to grow. 

Still another important phase of the transportation industry 
between Australia and the Pacific Coast is described by the 
Sydney Morning Herald, which reports the forthcoming instal- 
lation of a line of six steamships chiefly to be devoted to carry- 
ing case oil. The Herald gives these particulars : 

"The line has been established by the Gibson Co., which 
has entered into an important contract with the Standard 
Oil Company. Although case oil will be the principal 
cargo on the outward voyage, the new line will not devote 
its energies to this alone, and the company has accordingly 
arranged further contracts with the North Bend-Road and 
Willamette Pulp Paper Co. The first steamer of the line is 
expected to be in commission by next February. She will 
load her case oil at Point Richmond, San Francisco Bay, 
and will probably proceed to Astoria, Puget Sound, in 
connection with the last-named contract. This will be the 
procedure of the five other steamers, which will follow on 
at intervals of about two months. For the return journey 
to the Pacific Coast most of the vessels will load at New- 
castle. This cargo will be profitable in more respects than 
one, as they will be able to retain sufficient bunker coal 
to bring them back to Australia. Some of the steamers, 
however, will probably take back general cargo, and will 
bunker at Puget Sound for the return voyage." 

All this is reported under the head of new business and 
serves to indicate the importance of our steadily increasing 
trade with the Antipodes. 



January 17, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



The problem of the unemployed is 
The Swarming of far more serious in Los Angeles than 

The Genteel Poor. in San Francisco. It is not the hobo 

invasion that signifies so much, al- 
though that is sufficiently serious and far worse in the Southern 
city than here. It is the problem of genteel poverty that 
chiefly troubles Los Angeles. That city, by reason of its ex- 
tensively advertised climate and the promise of an easy living 
to be gained with little effort, has become the swarming place 
for crowds of people who seek "genteel" employment at any 
wages that will cover a bare living. The office stenographers' 
trade, for instance, is disastrously overdone, and the women are 
starving because they have no other means of livelihood. To 
dig they are unable, and to beg they are ashamed. Miss Delia 
C. De Lancy, writing to the New York Times, describes condi- 
tion in these words : 

"I know that every city has its quota of the great army 
of the unemployed, but Los Angeles is peculiarly and es- 
pecially afflicted in this respect, for reasons that are appar- 
ent. The glorious winter climate and beautiful scenery 
of Southern California have been advertised, not only 
through the United States, but all over the world. The re- 
sult is, that we have a transient population during the win- 
ter months of between 50,000 and 60,000 people, and of 
this number a large percentage are men and women who 
come here with the hope of securing employment that will 
pay their expenses through the winter. A few days ago 
I had occasion to visit several typewriter agencies in 
search of a competent law stenographer, and discovered 
that the conditions existing in this particular line of work 
are simply appalling. I was told by the managers of the 
agencies that there are at least twenty competent women 
for every stenographic position to be filled in the city of 
Los Angeles, and they have hundreds of applications on 
file which they cannot even consider. I am writing this 
with the hope that it may reach the eyes of at least a por- 
tion of the thousands who are leaving comfortable homes 
and positions, where they are earning fair wages, to join 
the waiting, anxious throng of the unemployed of this city. 
Los Angeles is a great city, with wonderful possibilities, 
but no city in the world, whatever its resources, can per- 
form the miraculous feat of furnishing employment to an 
unlimited horde of wage earners. We have the flowers, 
the green swards, and the sunshine; our scenes of unparal- 
leled beauty satisfy the eye, the artistic sense, and even 
the soul, but unfortunately they do not satisfy the stom- 
ach." 

These are some of the penalties of fame, however acquired, 
and they constitute an awkward condition. It is always possi- 
ble to find some sort of employment for the able-bodied man 
who is willing to work, but the problem of the genteel poor, es- 
pecially when they are women, is different. 

3KT 



Reports Greatly 
Exaggerated. 



The figures of electoral registration 
by parties have assumed the quality 
of news in view of the defiant chal- 
lenge sent out with plentiful horn- 
blowing by the Progressive leaders. Despite the reports of the 
decrease of the two old-line parties so industriously circulated 
by the organs of the Bull Moose, the testimony of the figures 
demonstrates the abundant vitality of those organizations. The 
figures, of course, change from hour to hour, but a few days 
ago the Republicans had a clear lead in this city, with the 
Democrats second, and the Progressives third. 

We would not attach too great importance to these figures 
for the game is still young, but as far as they go, they seem to 
supply an answer to the challenge issued by the Bull Moose, 
and the fashion in which the followers of that faction were im- 
plored to demonstrate their faith by works in the shape of reg- 
istration under the party name. Entertaining and instructive 



evidence of this state of mind is found in a half-page adver- 
tisement in the San Jose Mercury headed in flaring type: "Reg- 
ister as a Progressive, and do it now," with an explanatory note 
at the bottom reading : "This space purchased by the Progres- 
sive Party Club of San Jose." The body of the advertisement 
is devoted to abuse of the Republican party. Yet this impas- 
sioned appeal appears to have fallen on deaf ears, for a recent 
issue of the Mercury says editorially : 

"Registration in this county is progressing from day to 
day, as the Mercury Herald predicted, with the Repub- 
licans leading the Progressives about two to one, and the 
Democrats considerably less than either. This ratio or 
better will doubtless be maintained, since the tendency 
throughout the State is toward the old alignments rather 
than the new. It is the more noteworthy in view of the or- 
ganized activity of the Progressive party and the compara- 
tive indifference of Republicans." 

Other counties follow suit, and while we would not attach 
too much importance to the figures of early registration, they 
certainly indicate that the Republican and Democratic parties 
are neither dead nor sleeping. As we have been frequently as- 
sured by the Bull Moose horn-blowers that both parties were 
conclusively dead, we are now forced to the later conclusion that 
the reports were greatly exaggerated. 



No Rioting Will 
Be Tolerated. 



Chief White does well to inform the 
ringleaders of the I. W. W. that 
rioting or violence will not be toler- 
ated for an instant in this city. The 
other day a marching mob of these undesirables took possession 
of the business quarter of the city for an hour, terrorizing 
women and children, and assaulting men who dared come in 
their way. On Powell street a woman who got entangled in 
the mob had her clothes almost torn from her back. 

There are doubtless plenty of decent men in the ranks of the 
unemployed, men who honestly want work and food, and these 
will be supplied as fast as we can get around to them. Already 
extensive measures are in action to supply these needs, and no 
man need go without a meal. But there is an undesirable and 
disturbing element that spends its time hunting trouble, and 
wants nothing else. These people aim to live off the country 
like an invading army, and when they are offered work they 
make impudent refusal. A concrete instance of this disposition 
is supplied by the experience of the Sacramento municipal 
commission, as reported in the Union of that city, to wit: 

"Plenty of work has been offered to the men who are 
about the I. W. W. hall, but they refuse to take it. Yester- 
day a well known Placerville contractor offered to give 
twenty-five men $2.50 per day and board, and this was re- 
fused, the men demanding $3 per day and eight hours" 
work. Some of the unemployed who were sent to work for 
the West Sacramento Company worked about 15 minutes 
and stole the shovels given them to work with, returning 
to the city, where they sold the tools. These tactics have 
disgusted the members of the commission, who are willing 
to help the needy, but not the men who are parading the 
streets of the city pretending that they want work." 

The same disposition is found among the mob leaders in this 
cit .-, and when it finds expression in action, it will not be tol- 
erated for an instant — all of which may be said without preju- 
dice to a wise and humane handling of the problem of the 
unemployed. 

3BT 

Dr. John Grant Lyman, the Los Angeles blue sky oper- 
ator, now under sentence of fifteen months in jail, vows that he 
will devote the rest of his life trying to help first offenders. 
Here is another apostle of philanthropy in the lock-up. 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 17, 1914. 



THE CANDID FRIEND 

Dynamic Jurisprudence— Where Harriman was Badly Advised— Tideland Titles in Solu- 
tion—A Nose for News and a Nose for Law— An Agonized Conscience— A Double 
Majority— A Newspaper Yarn— San Quentin a Summer Resort 

BY EDWARD F. CAH1LL 



The recent tidelands decision of the State Supreme Court 
directs attention on the failure of lawyers to appreciate and 
measure the drift of jurisprudence. When the late E. H. Har- 
riman effected the merger of the Union and Southern Pacific 
he had the best legal advice that the transaction would stand 
the test of the courts, and was not obnoxious to the Sherman 
law against trusts. Among others, he had the advice of Elihu 
Root, who is regarded as the greatest lawyer in America. Ben- 
jamin Ide Wheeler, who knows him intimately, once told me 
that Senator Root's legal insight and acumen was almost un- 
canny by reason of their penetrating quality. Certainly no 
safer advise/ on the condition of the law as it then stood could 
have been had. Yet the event proved that Root was disas- 
trously mistaken. 

In a smaller way the same conditions have existed in regard 
,o tideland titles in California. I have always regarded such 
iitles as defective and unsafe, but when I have expressed my 
doubts to owners of such property they have scoffed at my 
fears, and have told me that they had the best legal advice as 
to the validity of their titles. 

8 ~8 8 

Where Lawyers Erred. 

The mistake that lawyers make in matters of this sort in- 
volving public rights is that they fail to appreciate the fact 
that jurisprudence is dynamic and not static. It moves. Doubt- 
less the lawyers were right in their opinion that tideland titles 
were valid as the law then stood, but they failed to recognize 
the fact that jurisprudence, especially in matters involving 
public rights, moves onward steadily. If they had been gifted 
with a nose for news instead of a nose for law, they might have 
been able to foresee a condition under which public opinion 
would compel a resumption of the State's rights in this regard. 
The philosophy of the situation was pithily summarized by 
Mr. Dooley when he remarked that "the Supreme Court reads 
the election returns." No more than any other science, juris- 
prudence is not stationary. In legal matters involving public 
rights or service, the advice of a lawyer might profitably be 
supplemented by the opinion of a newspaperman accustomed to 
estimate the drift and the drive of public opinion. 
X 5 S 

Indicates Line of Growth. 

Of course, it may be urged that all this is premature because 
the recent decision on tideland settles nothing important be- 
yond showing the direction in which things are moving. The 
status quo under that decision as it stands to-day is distinctly 
strange as well as confused. The apparent majority decision, 
roughly speaking, wipes out tideland titles by a vote of four 
to three, but one of the four — Chief Justice Beatty — hesitates 
and appears to agree with the minority on the question of com- 
pensation to tideland owners should the State resume the prop- 
erty. Justices Shaw, Angellotti and Sloss hold that the tide- 
land people never had any title, and therefore are entitled to 
no compensation. Judge Beatty agrees that they had no title, 
but still thinks they should be compensated. Justices Hen- 
shaw, Melvin and Lorigan are emphatic in their judgment that 
the owners should be fully compensated. 
S tf tf 

Psychology of the Court. 

The situation in the court is largely psychological. The Chief 
Justice is a grand old man whom we all respect and honor. " He 



is the very soul of honesty as he sees it, but he is afflicted with 
an agonized conscience, and is forever pursued by doubts that 
rack and torture a sensitive soul. So we find him in this in- 
stance uncomfortably roosted on top of the fence so that the 
court is left in the anomalous position of having two distinct 
majorities, with the Chief forming part of both. 

It should be obvious that if compensation for property 
rights must be paid for tideland owners, the decision changes 
nothing in the status quo ante. The State has always had the 
undisputed right under the law of eminent domain to condemn 
and take possession of these lands, or any other lands needed 
for a public purpose on payment of compensation to the owner. 
If the compensation rule is to prevail, the decision is brutum 
fulmen, a big fuss about nothing. 

S V X 
Compensation Rule Will Not Stand. 

But the compensation rule will not stand. Chief Justice Beatty 
retires at the end of the present year, and is not a candidate to 
succeed himself. There need be little doubt that he will be 
succeeded by some man who is more in touch with modern con- 
ceptions of jurisprudence, and we may look for a majority of 
gay, young evolutionaries laying down the law. It is not the 
place of a layman to decide which one of the two apparent 
majorities on the bench is right or wrong in the present case, 
and no opinion is hazarded here on that point. My single pur- 
pose is to point out the direction in which the jurisprudence of 
the State is moving. The case as it stands is left in a wholly 
unsettled state, and the vital question of compensation must 
be raised directly in another suit that cannot possibly come up 
for supreme adjudication for at least three or four years, when 
the personnel of the court may be very different. 

8 X 8 
A Living Science. 

In fine, the circumstances here and in the Southern Pacific 
merger suit supply a pregnant illustration of the fact that 
jurisprudence is not a dead science, but living. Yet it is and 
always has been the habit of lawyers to regard the science of 
law as a dead thing. Their first and most characteristic rule is 
expressed in dog latin, "Stare decisis"— let the decisions- 
stand. In the lawyers' creed a decision once made or a rule 
once laid down is fixed law forever. Sir Mathew Hale, the 
great English jurist, describes the common law as "the perfec- 
tion of human reason," and yet we know that this body of juris- 
prudence as it existed in Hale's time was a barbarous, medieval 
code, under which, for example, a wife was practically the 
chattel property of her husband. But the common law to-day 
is very different from the code of Hale's period. 

~8 "8 8 

Other Mixed Results. 

The mixed result in the tideland decision may be compared 
to the famous historical case that did so much to precipitate the 
war of secession. In that instance, it was said that "the court 
had given the law to the North and the nigger to the South." 
That decision was reversed with bayonets. 

Another historical case of the war period was that confirming 
the constitutionality of the legal tender act. In the opinion of 
many of the best lawyers of that day the law was clearly un- 
constitutional, but it was a war measure of public safety, and 
the consensus of lay opinion in the country compelled its ratifi- 
cation by the courts. 



January 17, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



Tom Reed and Judge Wallace. 

In this connection, a good story is told of the late Judge 
Wallace, of this city, and Thomas Brackett Reed, who later be- 
came the famous Speaker of the House of Representatives. 
Reed at that time was teaching school in Stockton, and was 
studying law for admission to the bar. Wallace was Chief 
Justice of the Supreme Court, which at that time conducted the 
examination of candidates for admission to the bar. Reed told 
the story himself. 

"My admission to the bar," he explained, "was characteristic 
of the time and place. It was in 1863, when everybody was 
stirred up about the legal tender act. One day Judge Wallace 
said to me, 'Tom, I hear you want to be admitted to practice in 
our courts.' I told him that I did. 'Very well,' said he, 'I'll ex- 
amine you. Is the legal tender act constitutional?' Knowing 
what he thought himself, I answered promptly: 'Yes, sir!' 'That 
is enough,' he said ; 'you're admitted. Any one who at your age 
can answer such a question without stopping to think, can 
hardly fail to make a hit in our profession.' " 

■Sr S ?r 
An Eavesdropper Nailed. 

The Los Angeles Graphic tells a good newspaper story of a 
hoax worked on an eavesdropping reporter of that city, and a 
narrowly averted journalistic catastrophe that ensued. It was 
at midnight in the reporters' room of the police station. The 
Times reporter was alone in the place when an automobile 
dashed up noisily, and the police reporters of the Tribune 
and Examiner jumped out. They ran for the telephones and 
began dictating the story of a wreck of a work train on the Pa- 
cific electric line. The motorman was killed. He had left a 
wife and four children. Several laborers whose names were 
carefuly supplied were badly injured. The Times man list- 
ened eagerly and jotted down the facts as they were related 
over the phones. It did not seem to strike him as remarkable 
that the two stories were identical in all details, a fact that 
might have put a more practiced hand at the game on suspicion. 
The sequel runs: 

"It took the Times man only a few seconds to rush across 
the corner to discover to the city editor what he had heard 
telephoned. He was told to write the story, and proceeded 
to do so, to the extent of about a column and a half. Along 
about time to go to press it occurred to one brilliant minded 
individual on the staff — rumor says it was the country edi- 
tor — that it might be a good plan to verify the yarn. This 
novel idea was seized with avidity by the receptive men- 
talities of the Times' local force, and the telephone was 
kept busy for half an hour routing Pacific Electric officials 
out of their slumber, to ask for the railway version of the 
accident. The ones who should have been the first to know 
of the wreck professed great surprise, and asked for infor- 
mation. Finally, after the Times press had started, and a 
few hundred copies of the paper with the account of the 
accident had gone out of the building beyond recall, the 
city editor of the Examiner decided the thing had gone far 
enough, and had the Times notified that its police reporter 
had been the victim of a plot to cure him of eavesdrop- 
ping." 

S S ~S 
Mapmakcrs at War. 

The mapmakers of Tuolumne and Stanislaus counties are 
at war over the location of the La Grange dam, which supplies 
water for the Turlock and Modesto irrigation districts. The 
Tuolumne surveyor claims to have discovered that the dam is 
a mile within that county's borders. Hitherto Stanislaus county 
has collected the taxes on the property. There was a time 
in the history of California when county surveyors settled dis- 
puted boundaries by stepping off the ground and a little earlier 
in the game there is more or less authentic record of a scienti- 



fic controversy in Stanislaus that was quieted with a chunk of 
old red sandstone that took the chief protagonist in the abdo- 
men so that 

He smiled a sort of sickly smile and curled up on the floor 
And the subsequent proceedings interested him no more. 

15 V IS 
Echoes of a Stormy Past. 

The Oakland police are in doubt about a woman arrested in 
that city whether to try her for insanity or for passing bad 
checks. The woman has done time in the penitentiary and 
in the insane asylum, but prefers the former as a steady home. 
To explain the method in her madness for passing bogus checks 
she told the police : 

"I want to live in style. I don't care if they send me back 
to San Quentin, though. It's a regular summer resort except 
that I don't like Mrs. Isabella Martin. I'm afraid she will 
poison me." 

These are the echoes of a stormy past invading the peaceful 
and elegant leisure of Eve in the Garden. God bless our home 
and keep the arsenic out of the tea. 

5 S V 
Nature Takes Its Course. 

The passion for regulating and prescribing the fashions of 
women's dress has rashly invaded the Los Angeles schools, and 
these are barred : Open work stockings ; split skirts ; beauty 
patches cut a la heart; jewels, bangles, earrings; extremely low 
neck gowns of silk; scented pink face powder and lip rouge. 

W. A. Winterburn, head of the art department in the Los An- 
geles Polytechnic High school, who should be authority on 
the esthetics of dress, is quoted : 

"Split skirts, low cut gowns, silk dresses, jewelry, paint or 
open work stockings are not appropriate for the school room. 
They distract the attention of the boys and girls from their 
lessons. A girl could be studying, playing good music, read- 
ing a worth-while book while she is primping. I indorse a 
movement for simplicity in dress for school girls." 

Dr. Snyder, principal of the Hollywood high school, said: 
"We want our girls to be real women, and not baby dolls. I 
know that extremes in dress in the class room distracts atten- 
tion from the business of the school, from the arithmetic, Latin, 
and in fact all lessons. The girls realize this, and are striving 
to co-operate in the matter of simplicity in dress. The split 
gown is a detriment to the pupils." 

"Primping," quotha! 

The masculine solicitude in these affairs and its general 
futility seems to recall the parable of the Roman poet about the 
rustic who sits on the bank waiting for the river to flow by. 
Nature takes its course. 




MACKIE & CO. 
1SLAY. SCOTLAND 

Never in Bulk 

Charles Meinecke &. Co. 

MM P.e.n. C...T »14 SACBAMtNTO ST.. ». F. 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 17, 1914. 




The Palo Alto Citizen says the Santa Clara county jail is 

branded by the grand jury as unfit to house human beings, but 
when the conditions noted were brought to the attention of a 
member of the Board of Supervisors, he pleaded: "I am op- 
posed to the promulgation of that story. We have not got the 
money to fix up the county jail, nor do we want to. The people 
of the county are clamoring for better roads, not a better jail, 
and we are trying to make better highways. The publication of 
the article would reflect on the Supervisors when they are not 
to blame for the jail, nor am I in sympathy with the idea of 
creating a demand for better conditions in the jail. Those fel- 
lows, who are in there have no reason to expect a home with all 
the modern conveniences when they commit the deed that sends 
them there. Let them be as they are; it will do them good." 
Such are the engrossing perplexities of Mr. Bumble. 

G. K. O'Leary, a San Jose photoplay manager, writes in 

reply to the suggestion that the "movies" should cut out the 
whole line of sensational pictures, and should devote a day or 
two every week to educational films. He says that in response 
to a similar request last year he made the experiment. He per- 
suaded the films company to weed out the sensations and send 
him an educational scenic or industrial picture every day. He 
adds that in the outcome "those very people that asked for 
these changes have never been to see if we have made them 
or not, and we are the only theatre in the city that is running 
this class of program, and a daily educational picture with 
nothing of the objectionable nature that this gentleman speaks 
of, and the children that attend this theatre can be counted on 
the fingers of one hand at any performance and the management 
has lost money by the policy." 

The San Bernardino Index prints a photograph of a row 

of houses sliding into the sea, and explains that this was due 
to the "high surf which pounded the teach southwest of San 
Francisco during the past week." The description is character- 
istic geography for the use of Southern California newspapers. 
Whenever the climate misbehaves or goes wrong down there it 
is at once moved up to San Francisco. As a matter of fact, no 
row of houses slid into the sea anywhere in the neighborhood 
of San Francisco, but this did happen in more instances than 
one on the Los Angeles beaches some five hundred miles away 
from this city. Besides, what land is "southwest of San Fran- 
cisco." We know of none much nearer than Hawaii. 

The elimination of the horse proceeds. During the past 

year the Oakland street department conducted a census of the 
traffic with this result, among others, that the motor traffic now 
exceeds the horse drawn traffic by a substantial margin. A 
total of 69,593 motor vehicles having been counted, as against 
60,242 horse-drawn vehicles. That is to say, 53.6 per cent of all 
traffic passing twenty-five selected stations consisted of motor 
vehicles of all kinds, and 46.4 per cent of horse-drawn vehicles. 
A similar census in San Francisco would be useful in the way 
of indicating the value of the different kinds of pavement. 

' The figure fiend of the Stockton Record, taking the cen- 
sus and the geography in combination, measures the density of 
population in the several cities of California. Some of the re- 
sults are_ interesting and suggestive, as for instance, when we 
learn that San Francisco has a population of 10,215 to the 
square mile, whereas Los Angeles has only 3,949 to the mile. 



One learns from the Oakland Observer that the local 

school board is troubled over the question whether the city is 
liable for loss of life or injury to pupils in case of fire or dis- 
aster, and the matter has been referred to the District Attorney 
for his opinion. Attorney-General Webb is said to have given 
an opinion that under the new liability law the school depart- 
ment would be liable for damages in case of accident. The un- 
known and unsuspected potentialities of this law are bewil- 
dering. 

The unemployed are hard to please. In Los Angeles, 

nearly all the girls registered at the municipal employment 
bureau refused offers of domestic service, although they say 
they are starving. One woman who has been on the register 
since it was opened is said to have refused twelve offers of 
service. One reason alleged for these refusals is that the girls 
are not accorded the privilege of entertaining company in the 
kitchen or even in the parlor. They all want to be steno- 
graphers. 

This is great weather for ducks and prophets. All signs 

come true in a wet year. There is Hatfield, the rainmaker, 
who has a contract with the farmers to cause ten inches of rain 
to fall on the west side of San Joaquin County. All he has to 
do this year is to keep track of his rain gauge and count up his 
prospective profits. No; he is not betting on sunspots, and he 
insists that he will ultimately be recognized by the government, 
but not as a blue sky operator. 

The district attorney of Santa Clara County threatens a 

social cyclone in that neighborhood, and promises to call as 
witnesses to prove the character of certain notorious road houses 
fifteen married women and several married men. The San Jose 
Mercury Herald says : "Of course there is nothing new in the 
confessions of these girls." Apparently there is a new district 
attorney in the county. 

A Battle Creek, Mich., crank wants to hold human stock 

shows with blue ribbons for the most perfect men and women. 
"We want good men and good women," he says, "and why not 
proceed in the same manner as we do in raising sheep and 
hogs." Well, for one thing, we know exactly what we want in 
a hog, but what we should desire in a man and how to get it is 
quite uncertain. 

The Bakersfield Californian unkindly asks Chester H. 

Rowell to explain why the Republicans and Democrats lead 
the Progressives in the Fresno registration. Rowell is the 
keeper of the Progressive conscience in that bailiwick, and he 
has repeatedly protested that both of the two old parties are 
conclusively dead, and he was glad of it because he helped to 
kill them. 

Fire Chief Anderson of Sacramento last week inspected 

a cheap lodging house run by the Salvation Army, which he 
found to be in an insanitary condition. Anderson stated that 
the army was deriving an income from the building, which 
would warrant an investment of $18,000, although the house is 
not worth more than $600. Thrift, Horatio, thrift! 

An echo of the New Year celebration in Oakland has it 

that the ladies — God bless them — at a fashionable cafe insti- 
tuted a kissing competition with Jack London as the object of 
osculation. It is related that the high kiss lasted five minutes 
by the stop watch. 

The San Jose Mercury Herald asks: "Have we a police 

department?" The question sounds familiar and indeed uni- 
versal. 

It seems as if Hiram Johnson might need some of those 

Republican votes now going on the great register. 



January 17, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



.9 




PUDASUR&S WAND 

"We obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




mmim 



PAUL GERSON. 



"Madame X" at the Alcazar. 

Mother love, the truest, the deepest, the most 
poignant, the holiest and the most human, is the 
key note of this play. This is why, at the final 
curtain, when people arise to put on their hats 
and coats, we see women, yes, and men too, un- 
ashamed, wiping away the tears. Mother love is 
the chord which touches us all. "Madame X" is 
not what one would call a great play. Its success 
lies in the faculty it has of reaching that some- 
thing in us which is responsive, that something 
like unto which there is nothing else in the world. 
If you should be a skeptic and doubt the truth of 
this statement, go to the Alcazar this week, and 
as you are leaving the theatre at the termination 
of the play, look around you, and you will see al- 
most without exception that every eye glistens, 
some red and swollen with weeping, men and wo- 
men; and you will then realize that mother love is 
universal, the one greatest refining influence which 
has been placed in the heart and the soul of the 
human. I witnessed the play when it was first 
done in this city some years ago, at the Savoy 
Theatre, I believe. I do not recall the name 
of the woman who portrayed "Madame X" at 
that time, but I have a distinct recollection of the 
great performance she gave of the role, better, I 
was informed, than that of Dorothy Donnelly, 
who, if memory serves, originated the part in 
New York. I wondered what Miss Vaughan 
would do with so great a part. I am glad to note 
that she gives her own interpretation of the erring 
woman, and her characterization is one which 
places her in my estimation with a number of our 
really great actresses of the day. This achieve- 
ment alone is enough to place the stamp of a great 
actress on Miss Vaughan. She does not act the 
part, she literally lives it. All her wonderful re- 
sources she calls to her command. I was under 
the impression that I had a pretty fair line on the 
work of Miss Vaughan, and that the many parts 
I have seen her in these years had given me a 
comprehensive idea of the scope and extent of 
her ability. In "Madame X" she surpasses all her 
previous efforts. The hardened professional 
chronicler of plays is commonly supposed to be 
flinty hearted, and that stage representations, no 
matter how emotional, have absolutely no effect 
on him. Monday evening at the Alcazar I found 
myself with the tears rolling unmolested down my cheeks, and 
then I knew that I was only like the others, a human being, and 
I forgot that I was there in the capacity of a critic. It is fitting 
that Miss Vaughan as her farewell should play this part. Our 
weeping serves a double purpose. In expressing our regret at 
losing her, we can look forward with renewed hope, confident 
that she and her talented husband will be with us again when 
the next Christmas holidays appear. 

Lytell was splendidly effective as the son. His appeal in 
the last act was given with a sincerity and a degree of feeling 
which was highly effective. He made his presence felt. Ly- 
tell has developed into an awfully clever actor, a dependable 
and a reliable man. Frank Burke was excellent as Louis Flo- 
riot. The more I see of Burke the better I like him. Edmond 
Lowe scored a decided hit as Noel, a performance which gives 
us an opportunity to observe some of the latent possibilities 
in the man. Ralph Bell as Dr. Chesnel, was satisfactory, and 
Kernan Cripps did fairly well with Laroque. Jerome Storm 
was capital as the simple-minded Victor, and Bert Wesner, of 
course, was fine as Perrisard. Louise Brownell had but little 




Edna Sho» alter, "The Girl of the Golden Voice," next week at Orpheum. 



to do, but was effective, and dainty Frances Carson was back 
again in a part suited to her sweet personality. Fred Wilson 
and Earle Emlay and Frank Wyman and S. A. Burton in small 
roles were uniformly good. The court room scene in the last 
act was very good. The play as a whole, with Miss Vaughan 
bearing the acting burden, is the most satisfying performance 
the Alcazar has given for some time. 

* * « 

"Antony and Cleopatra" at the Savoy. 

It was interesting to note the various comments made re- 
garding the merits of this wonderful film picture as the audience 
filed out into the street. The general opinion and verdict seemed 
to be that it was the greatest moving picture ever shown in this 
town. The important thing is that the audience as a whole was 
immensely pleased and tremendously impressed, and a satisfied 
audience is the best kind of an advertisement. The picture in 
question was taken by the Societa Italiana "Cines" of Rome, 
Italy. They have certainly done themselves proud. Personally 
I have witnessed a large number of feature pictures, but never 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 17, 1914. 



in my experience have I seen anything depicted on so massive 
and elaborate a plan where the details have been so faithfully 
worked out. Everything pertaining to the picture is historically 
.correct, down to the Roman triremes and the nude oarsmen. 
The handling of the mobs and the various battle scenes are done 
in a way which leaves little or nothing to be desired. Perspec- 
tives are worked out with wonderful artistic taste, and the pic- 
tures are grouped in a manner which shows conclusively that 
the Italians know a great deal about such things. The scenes 
of the entry of Octavius and his victorious army is a film mas- 
terpiece. So beautiful are the pictures that on several occasions 
the audience broke out into spontaneous applause, as if the 
figures had been living ones. Demonstrations like these are 
altogether new at a moving picture show, but they are doing the 
unusual at the Savoy these days. Mr. Bostwick, the manager of 
the house, has as cozy a theatre as can be found in this country, 
and the decorations are certainly unique and harmoniously ar- 
tistic, and of their kind without doubt the handsomest to be 



more than once. All the Italian actors in the long cast acquit 
themselves with much credit and in the hundreds of small parts 
and among the hundreds and hundreds in the mob scene I could 
not discern one instance where the participant was not doing 
his or her utmost to give the picture its full historical value. It 
is a marvelous picture. 

* * * 
Oil's Skinner in "Kismet'' at the Columbia. 

A wondrous spectacle is "Kismet," an ever-changing pano- 
rama of events in that far off East so little known to us. Ed- 
ward Knoblauch has evolved something new, an idea which is 
at once novel and tremendously interesting. In his Arabian 
Night tale, he has taken this character of Hajj, the beggar, and 
around him woven a fanciful tale, all of which is crowded into 
a day, and this story comprises love and hate and death. The 
author has chosen an environment which is highly picturesque 
and lovely to behold. His incidents are coherent, and the in- 




Triumphal return of Octavius, shown in "Antony and Cleopatra" at the Savoy Theatre. 



found anywhere. He has introduced an orchestra of seven sym- 
phony players, and their music becomes a pleasure to listen to, 
and between the acts we are regaled by the various soloists of 
the orchestra, who are all of them real musicians of the first 
rank. When I attended Saturday evening there was a line of 
automobiles in front of the theatre discharging their occupants, 
and I noted many of our most prominent social and business 
leaders in attendance. It is the aim of Mr. Bostwick to make of 
his house a moving picture theatre de luxe. He intends to bring 
here the very greatest masterpieces of the entire film world. 
His house is positively the last word in moving picture theatres. 
The Savoy shows the extreme development in every way in the 
moving picture world. It becomes a real pleasure to go there. 
Practically everybody is interested in the "movies" these days, 
and the Savoy aims to cater to those who want to see the best 
surrounded by refined and elegant and cultured surroundings. 
"Antony and Cleopatra" is a magnificent production and alto- 
gether remarkable in the fidelity with which each separate in- 
cident is caried out. It is a picture which you will wish to see 



terest is compelling and at times tense. Never have I witnessed 
an audience who have sat so literally spell-bound as at this 
performance. There is an atmosphere about the whole thing 
which succeeds in taking you away from these far Western 
shores, and transplanting you in the land of the gleaming min- 
arets and mosques. We have not out here seen the production 
of "The Garden of Allah," and so "Kismet," must stand as the 
biggest production of Oriental life we have ever seen staged. 
Haroun-al-Raschid himself could not have woven a more fanci- 
ful tale than has Knoblauch. The play, if so it can be called, is 
divided into numerous scenes, each of great beauty, and there is 
not a scene, however small, but is not filled with interest. I 
believe there are about ten of these scenes, and they pass before 
you more like a dream than a reality. You sit enthralled and 
thrilled. You wonder and you gasp, and when the final curtain 
falls you give an involuntary sigh of regret that it is all over 
and that we are back to earth again. "Kismet" almost baffles 
description. There is so much to tell it is hard to know where 
to begin. 



January 17, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



11 




Scene from "The Battle of Shiloh," the photo-drama of love 
and war, at the Tivoli. 

So much has been written about the play and the stupendous 
success it has gained that we at this late day can say but little. 
There remains, in fact, little for us to say. It has all been told 
and re-told these past two years. I can only ask you to go 
and see a most wonderful performance; that is, providing you 
are able to obtain seats. The clamor for an opportunity to see 
this spectacle is unusual, for even the Columbia, where records 
have been smashed time and again. Fortunate indeed was 
Harrison Grey Fiske, the producer, in securing for the great 
role of Hajj our greatest romantic actor, Otis Skinner. In this 
part of the beggar, who lives his life in a day, Skinner has 
thrown every shred of his splendid ability. Never, in the many 
parts I have witnessed him in have I known him to put such 
abandon and such earnestness, and it is evident that Skinner 
loves the role. It affords him a chance to run the entire gamut 
of emotion. In truth, there is no actor of the day on our entire 
English-speaking stage who is the peer of Skinner in work of 
this kind. Skinner simply revels in the part. He loves and he 
kills with equal skill. His art is now at the zenith. The role 
affords him his long-awaited opportunity. We thought some 
time ago that he was to do "Chanticler" in this country, but 
Frohman thought otherwise, and gave the role to Maud Adams 
who was almost a failure in it. It has been all for the best, 
however. One great reason for the large success of this play 
is its novelty. It is the one thing our people of to-day crave 
and demand. "Kismet" has every element of novelty which one 
can ask. The company is a very competent and large one, and 
of most interest to us is the appearance of Merle Maddern in 
the leading feminine role of Marsinah. Miss Maddern is a 
San Francisco girl, daughter of the late Mrs. Will Maddern, and 
received her first training for the stage at a local dramatic 
school. She is a relative of Mrs. Fiske. Miss Maddern has 
broadened and advanced in her art with large strides. She 
was a big surprise to me. She handled all of her big scenes 
with a surety of touch which denotes confidence. She will bear 
watching. The other roles are all in good hands, and the list 
is a long one. That scene of the bazaar is wonderful, and is a 
moving picture of Oriental life we shall long remember. "Kis- 
met" can exhaust all our adjectives. 

Big Bill at the Orpheum. 

The Orpheum this week is giving a marvelous bill of vaude- 
ville fare, with Maurice and Florence Walton as the leading 
features. These wonderful dancers express the very poetry of 
motion with all the latest improvements in the modern dances 
— tango, hesitation waltz, valse classique, and by way of cli- 
max the Maurice Walk, designed and executed by Mr. and Mrs. 
Maurice (Florence Walton.) The lithe and sinuous grace of 
the dances was greeted by the house with repeated thunders of 
applause, and the presentation to Mrs. Maurice of a sumptuous 
bouquet of American beauty roses. 

Nance O'Neil, a native daughter of California and an estab- 
lished favorite in San Francisco, shared the honors with the 



other headliners of the bill. The dramatic sketch in which she 
appears gives opportunity for some display of that wonderful 
emotional power for which Miss O'Neil has become distin- 
guished. Miss O'Neil is supported in very competent fashion 
by Alfred Hickman, George Majeroni and John Murray. 

Bert Fitzgibbon does some clever comedy work in a fifteen- 
minutes' sketch. Daisy Leon made a hit with her songs, and 
Martin E. Johnson shows an entertaining set of pictures of Jack 
London's voyage in the Snark. Some smart juggling is done 
by Roberto and Ben Verera. 

* * * 

A Circus Story at the Tivoli. 

The Tivoli has been presenting during the week a magnificent 
spectacle of which the central figure is "Thor, Lord of the 
Jungle." It is a tale of the circus told in moving pictures, and 
full of the fascination that seems to attend on the life of the 
sawdust and the ring. The story begins in the depths of the 
African jungle. "Thor" is the savage African lion whose cap- 
ture is shown by the films as well as his subsequent life as 
part of the menagerie of a three ring circus. This tale of the 
circus was supplemented by "A Waif of the Plains," a thrilling 
story of frontier life. 



Seven members of the Sacramento unemployed discov- 
ered Mrs. Rosie Garibaldi's wine cellar, and each secured a 
length of rubber hose which, says the Union, they attached to 
a barrel of the "red," and then lay down on their backs to have 
their fill. A woman who is no relation to Bacchus was passing 
and saw the merry crew. She phoned for the police. 



The Burlingame dog catcher has resigned his job be- 
cause his natural prey is too scarce in that neighborhood. "Too 
many rich dogs in Burlingame," he says, "and not enough 
strays wandering around." 



The North Beach gentleman who married a carnival 

queen was so jealous that he laid awake nights to hear her talk 
in her sleep. Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown. 




Aitor the Dance 

WIELAND'S 

'▼ THE HOME BEER 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 17, 1914. 



tfycmY, 




A neat little vendetta, done up in the proper finesse that dis- 
tinguishes a society package, and tied with the sauciest, crisp- 
iest kind of ribbons is being handed around the smart set, and 
even those who are just able to get a toe in on the sacred pre- 
cincts of said set are allowed to help pass around the vendetta. 

Do you "viva" for the Maurices? 

Do you "viva" for the Cranes? 

The viva touch is supplied by a story which Josephine de 
Nieto told the other night at a dinner party at Mrs. Eleanor 
Martin's. An American engineer was very busily engaged in 
trying to get out of Mexico, thoroughly intact in person and not 
altogether remote in soul — a difficult feat to accomplish un- 
der present conditions there. When he had almost reached the 
border, he was stopped by a band of men who demanded that 
he declare his principles. Sizing them up with that accurate 
eye which the engineer trains on everything, he shouted, "Viva 
Diaz." Whereupon the men fell upon him in fury, and demon- 
strated the Mexican synonym for a "beating up." A little far- 
ther on the road, he met another band, and this time in the full 
wisdom of experience he shouted: "Viva Huerta!" And with 
that, he was set upon by the ruffians, who did a thoroughly 
good job. The next group of men that he met stopped him and 
asked him for whom he vivaed. "You viva first," he answered. 

If one is not fond of argument, if one has no desire to see a 
blaze kindled out of a smouldering conversation on the dance, 
if one is strong for dove-colored conversation, and not keen 
about the tango anyway, the thing to do is to ask the other fel- 
low to viva first when the Maurices and the Cranes are men- 
tioned. 

But the trouble is, that while many people once qualified as 
lovers of peace at any cost, it's so hard now to find any one 
who is not keen about the tango. There are a great many who 
cannot dance it, but what they lack in skill with their bodies 
they make up in conversational ability and they are always 
ready to cross eloquence on the respective merits of dancers 
or the merits of the dance itself. So it's very difficult to find 
any one who is willing to let the other fellow viva first. In 
consequence, a conversation that starts in life in the calm and 
sequestered ways of stained glass seclusion before any one 
realizes what is happening has smashed the windows and is 
tearing around like dynamite let loose. The other night at the 
after-theatre supper a lady tried to get Bill Lange to declare 
that Mrs. Crane is a better dancer than Madam Maurice. "Ssh! 
we are watched," he hissed, in the best manner of a Nihilist, 
and then in low, fateful tones, "to-morrow at midnight, when 
no one is looking, at the corner of Sutter and Powell streets I 
will dare give my answer." 

© © © 

Others less astute and more daring are making comparisons. 
Unfortunately, the Russell Sage foundation fund does not per- 
mit investigation of such grave and fundamental conditions, so 
that it is not possible to here present statistics and to draw 
conclusions in the scientific manner of the modern investigator. 
But in the whirlwind discussion, any nimble society editor can 
patch up with a few satisfactory generalities. There is no doubt 
that Mrs. Crane is very popular here, and the advent of the 
great Maurice and his wife, who for dancing purposes is Flor- 
ence Walton, has if anything crystallized that popularity into 
fighting partisanship. If a Waltonite says that the dashing 
Florence has more verve, more of that indefinable something 
which the boy in the gallery would probably call "ginger," a 
Crane-ite admits it without a sigh, and calls attention to the 
fact that even the chorus is filled with girls who dance with 
verve and abandon, but Mrs. Crane's dancing has that glorified 
quality of poetry and wistfulness and will-o-the-wispness that 
makes her dances an art apart. The concensus. of opinion here 
seems to be that Mrs. Crane is the more unusual dancer of the 
two. 

Of course, Mrs. Crane must know this — must realize that she 
has not lost out to the wife of M. Maurice. Nevertheless, one 



hears those who are following the affairs of the dance comment 
on the fact that Mrs. Crane looks sad these days. Those who 
do arithmetic out loud on the accounts give as the answer that 
she also realizes that M. Maurice has somehow succeeded in 
putting the blight of inferiority on the dancing of Mr. Douglas 
Crane. They say that if a vote were taken that Mrs. Crane 
would win over Florence Walton Maurice, but M. Maurice him- 
self would snow Crane under. Mrs. Crane's first name is Ivy, 
and she has the proper clingsome qualities that should go with 
it, and ever since her arrival here has been distinguished by 
ardent loyalty to her husband, resenting fiercely any implica- 
tion that she is the star of the team. While they were both 
dancing with great success at a local playhouse, she had a 
pretty little manner of showing by handclasps and bows to him 
that she interpreted a good half of the applause as his sole 
property and not a community talent acquired through mar- 
riage. 

Those who make an analysis look like a shredded wheat bis- 
cuit, and dessicate a reason into shreds, maintain that Maurice 
has not won out by his dancing alone, but that he has the more 
pleasing personality; that in spite of the fact that he is a 
dancing-master he seems more man than mannikin — that he 
has a delightful way of looking as though life were a very gay 
and sunshiny place instead of going around in a very bored way 
and frightfully conscious of an impeccable costume. Far be it 
from me to take any sides in this argument. I am merely pre- 
senting what seems to be the consensus of opinion — that neither 
team gets the apple, but that it will have to be made into apple 
sauce, and that Mrs. Crane and M. Maurice get the biggest 
saucers. 

Before I go any further, you "viva first." 
© © © 

Mrs. Francis Carolan has brought back some of the crackers 
which are the last word of extravagant dining abroad, and 
which are used at private affairs in New York, but have not yet 
appeared on the menus at hotels as they do at the Ritz and 



OUR MID-WINTER SALE 

NOW IN PROGRESS 

A sweeping and unreserved clearance of fine 
Suits, Dresses and Coats. Everyone positively 
of the value we claim for it, and most unusual 
bargains. 

SUITS 

Suits that formerly sold up to $18.75, now - $6 

Suits that formerly sold up to $25.00, now - $9 

Suits that formerly sold up to $35.00, now - $12 

Suits that formerly sold up to $40.00, now - $1S 

Suits that formerly sold up to $50.00, now - $18 

Suits that formerly sold up to $60.00, now - $21 

Suits that formerly sold up to $75.00, now - $24 



COATS 



Coats that formerly sold up to $15, now 
Coats that formerly sold up to $20, now 
Coats that formerly sold up to $25, now 
Coats that formerly sold up to $30, now 
Coats that formerly sold up to $35, now 
Coats that formerly sold up to $40, now 
Coats that formerly sold up to $55, now 

DRESSES 

Dresses worth up to $12.50, now - 

Dresses worth up to $15.00, now - 

Dresses worth up to $18.75, now - 

Dresses worth up to $25.00, now - 

Dresses worth up to $35.00, now - 

Dresses worth up to $40.00, now • 

All Evening Gowns worth from $50 up at '; price 



$ 5 
$ 8 
$11 
$14 
$17 
$20 
$23 



$ 3 

$ 5 
$ 7 
$ 9 
$13 
$19 




974 MARKET ST. Bet. Mason and Taylor 



January 17, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



other fashionable hotels in London. Mrs. Carolan used them as 
surprise favors at an informal little dinner party the other 
night. When the crackers and cheese were passed, the guests 
found fascinating favors concealed in the crackers, and as this 
fad is new out here, it created much interest. A Ritz menu, 
which a friend brought back with her from London quotes 
crackers from ten to twenty-five dollars a dozen ready to serve, 
and announces that they will be made to order, if more expen- 
sive onces are desired. My friend, not knowing that favors 
were concealed in the crackers, decided that there must be a 
strike on in the biscuit factories, and confesses that she created 
much merriment by remarking to her hosts that it was fortunate 
that bread was obtainable at cheaper prices for Queen Mary, 
without fear of losing her head, might tell the crackerless peo- 
ple to eat bread! 

e © © 

The popularity of the dansant as a medium for benefits re- 
mains undiminished, and on Thursday of this week the one for 
the benefit of the Army Relief Fund brought out the full dan- 
cing set, which means that the army and navy were so well 
represented that there were more beaus than belles, and the 
added exhilaration of having plenty of men gave a tang to the 
affair quite apart from the clink of the many dollars that went 
for extras not down in the ordinary tea service. The dansant 
is the easiest way of making money for charity that has yet 
been invited. The patronesses do not have to bestir them- 
selves to make a go of it as they do in other ventures. Reports 
from the committee that managed the pageant for the benefit 
of the Seamen's Institute show that the only money which was 
cleared was at the afternoon dansant at the Palace. The 
patronesses of the Girls' Recreation Club have not yet added 
up all their profits, but their theatre party the other night netted 
them between $1,500 and $2,000. Mrs. Templeton Crocker, 
who has inherited her father's business ability, calculated that 
they might have made as much at a dansant with less trouble. 
They bought out the house for the second night of "Within 
the Law," raised the prices down stairs to three dollars, 
charged one hundred dollars for the boxes, which meant, of 
course, that they had to get in and sell seats to their friends 
who were willing to pay the extra charge, and selling seats at 
an advanced rate is never easy even when it is attempted by 
those who have social influence and great wealth, as in the case 
of the patronesses of this affair. Of course, this particular 
group sold out the house, but not without more effort than it 
takes to put over a successful dansant. 



Those who appreciate the unique and beautiful will be 

well repaid for a visit to the Tait-Zinkand Cafe. There can 
be seen one of the most pleasing creations of the decorator's 
art. It is a replica of Festival Hall of the Temple of Arbaces, 
from the Last Days of Pompeii. One senses immediately the 
atmosphere of the grandeur and beauty of the days of Pompeii, 
and the attention is held not only by the exquisite beauty and 
harmony, but by an unusualness as well. These decorations, 
when finished, will without doubt be the finest and most elabo- 
rate ever attempted in San Francisco. They are warm with 
the clime of their origin, and make a distinctive appeal to all 
who view them. 



One of Breuer's big canvases can be framed by E. B. 

Courvoisier as expeditiously and as satisfactorily as a little 
Copley print, or a monotype by Xavier Martinez. A wide and 
exclusive collection of framing materials. 431 Sutter street. 



(Advertisement) 




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Scottish Kite Temple. Van Ness and Sutter 
Just Opened Telephone Prospect ! 



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M. MAURICE AND FLORENCE WALTON 

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EVERY EVENING 

Under the Management of James Woods 



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VICTOR REITER, Manager 



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Special monthly rates. 

PACIFIC GROVE HOTEL 

Three miles by trolley from DEL 
MONTE, under same management. 
Daily rates $2.50 to $4 per day. 
Special monthly rates. 



Above hotels are under the management of 

H. R. WARNER, Del Monte, California 





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APPLIED ART WORK 




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Applied Art Needle Work Hand Painted China 




Occasion Cards, Card Prizes and other 




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HASTINGS Bl'ILDrl 




- 1 REET AT 01 I. P., CAL 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 17, 1914. 




^CIETX 




A neat little vendetta, done up in the proper finesse that dis- 
tinguishes a society package, and tied with the sauciest, crisp- 
iest kind of ribbons is being handed around the smart set, and 
even those who are just able to get a toe in on the sdcred pre- 
cincts of said set are allowed to help pass around the vendetta. 

Do you "viva" for the Maurices? 

Do you "viva" for the Cranes? 

The viva touch is supplied by a story which Josephine de 
Nieto told the other night at a dinner party at Mrs. Eleanor 
Martin's. An American engineer was very busily engaged in 
trying to get out of Mexico, thoroughly intact in person and not 
altogether remote in soul — a difficult feat to accomplish un- 
der present conditions there. When he had almost reached the 
border, he was stopped by a band of men who demanded that 
he declare his principles. Sizing them up with that accurate 
eye which the engineer trains on everything, he shouted, "Viva 
Diaz." Whereupon the men fell upon him in fury, and demon- 
strated the Mexican synonym for a "beating up." A little far- 
ther on the road, he met another band, and this time in the full 
wisdom of experience he shouted: "Viva Huerta!" And with 
that, he was set upon by the ruffians, who did a thoroughly 
good job. The next group of men that he met stopped him and 
asked him for whom he vivaed. "You viva first," he answered. 

If or.e is not fond of argument, if one has no desire to see a 
blaze kindled out of a smouldering conversation on the dance, 
if one is strong for dove-colored conversation, and not keen 
about the tango anyway, the thing to do is to ask the other fel- 
low to viva first when the Maurices and the Cranes are men- 
tioned. 

But the trouble is, that while many people once qualified as 
lovers of peace at any cost, it's so hard now to find any one 
who is not keen about the tango. There are a great many who 
cannot dance it, but what they lack in skill with their bodies 
they make up in conversational ability and they are always 
ready to cross eloquence on the respective merits of dancers 
or the merits of the dance itself. So it's very difficult to find 
any one who is willing to let the other fellow viva first. In 
consequence, a conversation that starts in life in the calm and 
sequestered ways of stained glass seclusion before any one 
realizes what is happening has smashed the windows and is 
tearing around like dynamite let loose. The other night at the 
after-theatre supper a lady tried to get Bill Lange to declare 
that Mrs. Crane is a better dancer than Madam Maurice. "Ssh! 
we are watched," he hissed, in the best manner of a Nihilist, 
and then in low, fateful tones, "to-morrow at midnight, when 
no one is looking, at the corner of Sutter and Powell streets I 
will dare give my answer." 

© © © 

Others less astute and more daring are making comparisons. 
Unfortunately, the Russell Sage foundation fund does not per- 
mit investigation of such grave and fundamental conditions, so 
that it is not possible to here present statistics and to draw 
conclusions in the scientific manner of the modern investigator. 
But in the whirlwind discussion, any nimble society editor can 
patch up with a few satisfactory generalities. There is no doubt 
that Mrs. Crane is very popular here, and the advent of the 
great Maurice and his wife, who for dancing purposes is Flor- 
ence Walton, has if anything crystallized that popularity into 
fighting partisanship. If a Waltonite says that the dashing 
Florence has more verve, more of that indefinable something 
which the boy in the gallery would probably call "ginger," a 
Crane-ite admits it without a sigh, and calls attention to 'the 
fact that even the chorus is filled with girls who dance with 
verve and abandon, but Mrs. Crane's dancing has that glorified 
quality of poetry and wistfulness and will-o-the-wispness that 
makes her dances an art apart. The concensus. of opinion here 
seems to be that Mrs. Crane is the more unusual dancer of the 
two. 

Of course, Mrs. Crane must know this— must realize that she 
has not lost out to the wife of M. Maurice. Nevertheless, one 



hears those who are following the affairs of the dance comment 
on the fact that Mrs. Crane looks sad these days. Those who 
do arithmetic out loud on the accounts give as the answer that 
she also realizes that M. Maurice has somehow succeeded in 
putting the blight of inferiority on the dancing of Mr. Douglas 
Crane. They say that if a vote were taken that Mrs. Crane 
would win over Florence Walton Maurice, but M. Maurice him- 
self would snow Crane under. Mrs. Crane's first name is Ivy, 
and she has the proper clingsome qualities that should go with 
it, and ever since her arrival here has been distinguished by 
ardent loyalty to her husband, resenting fiercely any implica- 
tion that she is the star of the team. While they were both 
dancing with great success at a local playhouse, she had a 
pretty little manner of showing by handclasps and bows to him 
that she interpreted a good half of the applause as his sole 
property and not a community talent acquired through mar- 
riage. 

Those who make an analysis look like a shredded wheat bis- 
cuit, and dessicate a reason into shreds, maintain that Maurice 
has not won out by his dancing alone, but that he has the more 
pleasing personality; that in spite of the fact that he is a 
dancing-master he seems more man than mannikin — that he 
has a delightful way of looking as though life were a very gay 
and sunshiny place instead of going around in a very bored way 
and frightfully conscious of an impeccable costume. Far be it 
from me to take any sides in this argument. I am merely pre- 
senting what seems to be the consensus of opinion — that neither 
team gets the apple, but that it will have to be made into apple 
sauce, and that Mrs. Crane and M. Maurice get the biggest 
saucers. 

Before I go any further, you "viva first." 
© © © 

Mrs. Francis Carolan has brought back some of the crackers 
which are the last word of extravagant dining abroad, and 
which are used at private affairs in New York, but have not yet 
appeared on the menus at hotels as they do at the Ritz and 



OUR MID-WINTER SALE 

NOW IN PROGRESS 

A sweeping and unreserved clearance of fine 
Suits, Dresses and Coats. Everyone positively 
of the value we claim for it, and most unusual 
bargains. 

SUITS 

Suits that formerly sold up to $18.75, now - $6 

Suits that formerly sold up to $25.00, now - $ 9 

Suits that formerly sold up to $35.00, now - $12 

Suits that formerly sold up to $40.00, now - $15 

Suits that formerly sold up to $50.00, now - $18 

Suits that formerly sold up to $60.00, now - $21 

Suits that formerly sold up to $75.00, now - $24 



COATS 



Coats th 
Coats th 
Coats th 
Coats th 
Coats th 
Coats th 
Coats th 



at formerly sold up to $15, now 
at formerly sold up to $20, now 
at formerly sold up to $25, now 
at formerly sold up to $30, now 
at formerly sold up to $35, now 
at formerly sold up to $40, now 
at formerly sold up to $55, now 



DRESSES 



Dresses worth up to $12.50, now - 

Dresses worth up to $15.00, now - 

Dresses worth up to $18.75, now - 

Dresses worth up to $25.00, now - 

Dresses worth up to $35.00, now - 

Dresses worth up to $40.00, now - 

All Evening Gowns worth from $50 up at ' / 2 price 



$ 5 
$ 8 
$11 

$14 
$17 
$20 
$23 



$ 3 
$ 5 

$ 7 
$ 9 
$13 
$19 




974 MARKET ST. Bet. Mason and Taylor 



January 17, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



other fashionable hotels in London. Mrs. Carolan used them as 
surprise favors at an informal little dinner party the other 
night. When the crackers and cheese were passed, the guests 
found fascinating favors concealed in the crackers, and as this 
fad is new out here, it created much interest. A Ritz menu, 
which a friend brought back with her from London quotes 
crackers from ten to twenty-five dollars a dozen ready to serve, 
and announces that they will be made to order, if more expen- 
sive onces are desired. My friend, not knowing that favors 
were concealed in the crackers, decided that there must be a 
strike on in the biscuit factories, and confesses that she created 
much merriment by remarking to her hosts that it was fortunate 
that bread was obtainable at cheaper prices for Queen Mary, 
without fear of losing her head, might tell the crackerless peo- 
ple to eat bread! 

© © © 

The popularity of the dansant as a medium for benefits re- 
mains undiminished, and on Thursday of this week the one for 
the benefit of the Army Relief Fund brought out the full dan- 
cing set, which means that the army and navy were so well 
represented that there were more beaus than belles, and the 
added exhilaration of having plenty of men gave a tang to the 
affair quite apart from the clink of the many dollars that went 
for extras not down in the ordinary tea service. The dansant 
is the easiest way of making money for charity that has yet 
been invited. The patronesses do not have to bestir them- 
selves to make a go of it as they do in other ventures. Reports 
from the committee that managed the pageant for the benefit 
of the Seamen's Institute show that the only money which was 
cleared was at the afternoon dansant at the Palace. The 
patronesses of the Girls' Recreation Club have not yet added 
up all their profits, but their theatre party the other night netted 
them between $1,500 and $2,000. Mrs. Templeton Crocker, 
who has inherited her father's business ability, calculated that 
they might have made as much at a dansant with less trouble. 
They bought out the house for the second night of "Within 
the Law," raised the prices down stairs to three dollars, 
charged one hundred dollars for the boxes, which meant, of 
course, that they had to get in and sell seats to their friends 
who were willing to pay the extra charge, and selling seats at 
an advanced rate is never easy even when it is attempted by 
those who have social influence and great wealth, as in the case 
of the patronesses of this affair. Of course, this particular 
group sold out the house, but not without more effort than it 
takes to put over a successful dansant. 



Those who appreciate the unique and beautiful will be 

well repaid for a visit to the Tait-Zinkand Cafe. There can 
be seen one of the most pleasing creations of the decorator's 
art. It is a replica of Festival Hall of the Temple of Arbaces, 
from the Last Days of Pompeii. One senses immediately the 
atmosphere of the grandeur and beauty of the days of Pompeii, 
and the attention is held not only by the exquisite beauty and 
harmony, but by an unusualness as well. These decorations, 
when finished, will without doubt be the finest and most elabo- 
rate ever attempted in San Francisco. They are warm with 
the clime of their origin, and make a distinctive appeal to all 
who view them. 



One of Breuer's big canvases can be framed by E. B. 

Courvoisier as expeditiously and as satisfactorily as a little 
Copley print, or a monotype by Xavier Martinez. A wide and 
exclusive collection of framing materials. 431 Sutter street. 



( Advert iMn«nU 





-.20* 


Mffltar sm& 


BtedgiMsfr ©IT IPumsosim Frocks 


MMaHnm® Alike 


Scottish Rite Temple, Van Xess and Sutter 


Just Opened 


Telephone Prospect 2 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

A delightful contribution to the charm of life in 
cosmopolitan San Francisco. 

M. MAURICE AND FLORENCE WALTON 

The world's greatest rhythmic dancers 

In the Rose Room, Herter's sensuously beautiful 
decorative achievement, during supper 

EVERY EVENING 

Under the Management of James Woods 



RESERVE YOUR TABLES FOR THE 

"THES DANSANTS" 

ON SATURDAY AFTERNOONS 
FROM 4 TO 7 

IN THE 

PALACE HOTEL COURT 



HOTEL OAKLAND cZSa 

460 Rooms with Outside Exposure (No Court Rooms' 
RATES: Rooms, detached bath $1.50 oerdayand up 
Rooms, private bath $2.00 per day and up 
EUROPEAN PLAN 

Advantageous Rates to Permanent Guests 
Noted for Cuisine and Service Restaurant Prices Moderate 
Home Atmosphere and Genuine Hospitality 
VICTOR REITER, Manager 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

125 miles south from San Francisco. 
Finest all grass Golf Course in Califor- 
nia. Daily rates, $5, $6, $7 per day. 
Special monthly rates. 

PACIFIC GROVE HOTEL 

Three miles by trolley from DEL 
MONTE, under same management. 
Daily rates $2.50 to $4 per day. 
Special monthly rates. 



Above hotels are under the management of 

H. R. WARNER, Del Monte, California 





#-n 


CLEARANCE SALE 




ffr 1 


DURING JANUARY 




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CHINESE CURIOS 




APPLIED ART WORK 




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MISS CLAYES 






401-404 Liebes Building, 177 Post St., near Grant Avenue 







Mrs. Marie Read 



Miss Josephine K. Fischer 



"tlr Ciift anil ifaimur S'linp" 

Applied Art Needle Work Hand Painted China 

Occasion Cards, Card Prizes and other 

Artistic Novelties 

IT GRANT AVB 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 17, 1914. 




Announcement* suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear In the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 

EEACH-WILKENS. — Mrs. J. N. Beach announces the engagement of her 
daughter, Marie, to Albert Wilkens. 

BLOOM-GORDON. — Mrs. A. Bloom announces the engagement of her 
daughter, Minnie, to Joseph Gordon of Cincinnati, Ohio. 

CLINE-PALMER. — One of the recent engagements was made known at 
a tea which Dr. and Mrs. J. W. Cline gave in Santa Rosa, announcing 
the betrothal of their daughter, Miss Ada Cline. to Mr. Frederick Ells- 
worth Palmer of San Francisco. 

EHRLICH-ALDERJIAN.— Mr. and Mrs. Herman Ehrlich announce the 
engagement of their daughter. Carrie, to Louis Alderman of Reno, 
Nevada. The wedding date is set for February 15th, 

GOLDSTEIN-OFFENBACH.— Mr. and Mrs. M. Goldstein announce the 
engagement of their daughter, Esther, to M. O. Offenbach. 

JACGBS-JACOBY— The engagement of Miss Eda Jacobs and Mr. Henry 
Jacoby has 'teen announced. 

MENDEL-SCHNEIDER. — Mr. and Mrs. Mendel announce the engagement 
of their daughter. Rose, to Mr. Leon Schneider. 

MOOSER-CUMMIXGS.— Mrs. Shelby Cummings gave a tea on Wednesday 
of last week to announce the engagement of her sister, Miss Aileen 
Mooser, to her husband's brother. Mr. Tracy Cummings. 

REID-TUBBS. — Mr. and Mrs. Merritt J. Reid announced the engagement 
•during the week of Miss Merritt Reid and Mr. Chapin Tubbs. 

SMITH-GOLDBERG.— Mr. and Mrs. H. Smith announce the engagement 
of their daughter, Jennie, to Mr. David Goldberg. 

VALENTINE -STARKE. — The engagement of Miss Eloise Valentine, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Valentine, to Bruce Stark of Vir- 
ginia, is announced. 

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
McHENRY-SCOTT. — Miss Marie McHenry, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 

Frank T. McHenry, has chosen February 10th as the date for her 

marriage to Leland Scott. 
SMITH-FREEMAN.— The marriage of Commander Frederick Newton 

Freeman and Miss Josephine Smith will be an elaborate function, at 

noon, at Coronado, at Christ Church, followed by a reception. 
SONNTAG-MURRAY. — Miss Ha Sonntag will be married to Hamilton 

Murray on Tuesday, February 17th. 

WEDDINGS. 

CARR-ELLTS. — Miss Daphne Carr, daughter of the late Commander 
Carr, C. M. G., Royal Navy, and niece of Sir Frederich Wigan, and 
Lieutenant Robert Ellis, C. A. C, were married on New Year's day. 

FISHER-BAUMGARTEN. — Miss Genevieve Fisher, daughter of Mrs. M. 
Fisher, and Mr. Leon Baurngarten were married on Sunday in the 
Rose Room of the Hotel -St. Francis, at high noon. 

GREENBLATT-STEIN.— Mr. and Mrs. Albert O. Stein, whose marriage 
took place on last Wednesday evening, are touring Southern Cali- 
fornia on their wedding trip. 

HIXZ- WALSH. — Miss Gertrude Hinz and Frank Walsh were married 
at the home of the bride's mother. Mrs. A. C. Hinz. in Mill Valley 
Tuesday night. 

HUFFMAN-GRIFFITH. — A wedding that was made known this week was 
that of Miss Laura C. Huffman and Dr. Archer Griffith. It was quietly 
celebrated Wednesday afternoon at the residence of the bride's 
mother on Broadway. 

JONES-CARSON. — The wedding of Lieutenant Herbert Jones. U. S. N., 
and Miss Ethelwyn Carson took place Saturday in Los Angeles at 
the home of the bride's mother, Mrs. E. W. Sargent. 

LACY-HIGGINS. — A Los Angeles wedding occurred Monday night in 
which many San Franciscans were interested, a number of them going 
South for the event. Miss Josephine Lacy became the bride of Mr. 
James Edwin Higgins, Jr., of this city in one of the most beautiful 
ceremonies of the winter. 

McMULLIN-GALLOIS.— Mr. and Mrs. John Gallois sailed on the Lusitania 
on the 14th, en route to Europe on their honeymoon. The wedding of 
Miss Eliza McMullin and Mr. John Gallois took place WedXK 
evening. 

SARTHOU-VON DER LEITH.— The engagement of Miss Eva Sarthou and 
Dr. Harold von der Leith was announced at a tea given during the 
week by Miss Marion de Guerre. The wedding took place on Wednes- 
day, January 14th, at the home of Mr, and Mrs. Frank Peters, in 
Green street, near Buchanan. 

SICKE-GREEN. — Miss Faulyne Sicke, daughter of Joseph Sicke, and Mr. 
Joseph R. Green of this city were married Wednesday evening of last 
week in St. Boniface's Church at S o'clock. 

DANCES. 

ABBOTT. — Mr. and Mrs. William M. Abbott will give a dance in honor of 
their son. Lindley, January 24th. 

BEAVER. — Miss Isabelle Beaver was hostess Tuesday evening at a 
dinner dance given in honor of Miss Amy Morrison. 

CALIFORNIA. — Captain Newton A. McCully and other officers of the U. 
S. S. California entertained at a farewell dance on last Saturday af- 
ternoon on board ship. The California left Sunday for Mare Island. 



DETRICK. — Mrs. Bowie Detrick and her son. Bowie" Detrick. will make 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Fagan the motifs for a small dance which they 
will give at their home in Jackson street, Saturday, January 17th. 

DRUM. — Mr. and Mrs. John S. Drum gave a small dance at their borne 
on Broadway, Friday evening, January 16th, in honor of winsome 
little Miss Marie Louise Black. 

MACCABIAN CLUB. — Maccabian Club will give a dance Sunday evening, 
January 18 th. 

MURPHY. — Mr. and Mrs. Daniel T. Murphy entertained a number of thtlr 
friends at their home on Tuesday evening, the group being members 
of a dancing club to which the Murphys also belong. 

SATURDAY EVENING ASSEMBLY.— The Saturday Evening Assembly 
will give its next dance on January 24th at the California Club. 

SEQUOIA CLUB. — Last Wednesday was the second of the series of 
dances given at Sequoia Club. 

STILLMAN. — Dr. and Mrs. Stanley Stillman gave a pretty dinner dance 
on Wednesday, the 7th, In honor of their niece, Miss Amy Morrison 
of Redlands. 

SPECIAL DANCING CLASS. — On Tuesday evening, the special dancing 
class organized by the Mesdames E. J. Pringle, Augustus Taylor, 
George Harry Mendel. George A. Pope, Cuyler Lee and George A. New- 
hall had its first assembly in the ballroom of one of the cafes down- 
town. 

WEDNESDAY NIGHT CLUB.— The Wednesday Night Bridge and Dan- 
cing Club enjoyed another of its delightful reunions last Wednesday, 
the 7th, at California Club, entertaining about a hundred. 
THEATRE PARTIES. 

NICOL. — Miss Helen Nicol was the guest of honor at a theatre party given 
by Miss Anne Peters Monday evening, when Captain and Mrs. John 
Bourke Murphy acted as chaperons. 

PETERS. — Captain and Mrs. John Burke Murphy chaperoned a jolly 
party of young people on Monday night at a theatre party, and later 
at the dansant at the Hotel St. Francis. 

RECITALS. 

VAN KIRK. — Miss Lila Van Kirk will give a series of drawing room trav- 
elogue recitals at the St. Francis Hotel in the red room, beginning 
January 13th and continuing Tuesdays and Thursdays until Janu- 
ary 2 2d. 

LUNCHEONS. 

RLANI.'IXG. — Mrs. Gordon Blanding has issued invitations to a luncheon 
which she will give Tuesday, January 20th, at the Fairmont Hotel, 
complimentary to Madame de la Lande. 

COLEMAN. — Miss Janet Coleman gave a luncheon Thursday, afterwards 
taking her guests to the concert given by Miss Kathleen Parlow. 

COWDIN. — Mr?. Cheever Cowdin entertained at luncheon at the Francisca 
Club Wednesday in honor of Miss Ruth Zeile and Miss Beatrice 
Nickel. 

DEERING. — Mrs. Henry Lombard of Los Angeles is visiting in town, re- 
newing old friendships. Mrs, Charles Deering was hostess at a lunch- 
eon at her home, with Mrs. Lombard as guest of honor. 

FORD. — Mrs. Bernard Ford gave a luncheon Wednesday in honor of Miss 
Vera de Sabla. 

GREER. — Mrs. Robert Greer was the complimented guest at a delightful 
luncheon given Tuesday afternoon by Mrs. Alfred Baker Spalding at 
the Town and Country Club. 

LENT. — Mrs. Eugene Lent has issued cards for a bridge luncheon for 
January 20th. 

McLOUGHLIN. — Miss Isabel McLoughlin was guest of honor at a luncheon 
which Miss Metha McMahon gave Monday at the Francisca Club. 

McMAHON. — Miss Metha McMahon entertained some of her friends at 
an attractive luncheon Tuesday at the Francisca Club, in honor of 
Miss Isabel McLoughlin. 

MURRAY. — Mrs. Maxwell Murray, wife of Lieutenant Murray, was 
hostess at a delightful informal violet luncheon recently, after which 
a few rubbers of bridge were enjoyed. 

DINNERS. 
BOURN.— Mr. William B. Bourn entertained a number of friends at a 

dinner last week at his residence on Webster street. 
DEARTN. — Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Dearin gave a dinner Thursday of last 

week in honor of their son, Harry, who has been home for the holidays. 
DE ROSENZWEIG. — Baroness de Rosenzweig gave an Informal dinner 

dance Thursday evening at the Palace for her nieces, the Misses 

Rose and Josephine Nieto. 
GREER. — Mr. and Mrs. Robert Greer were the motifs for an informal 

dinner given by Mr. and Mrs. Silas Palmer Wednesday evening. 
LOMBARD. — Gay Lombard, who has come down from Portland for a 

few weeks, gave a large stag dinner at the Burlingame Club Saturday 

evening. 
STEWART. — Miss Margaret Stewart entertained at dinner Thursday 

evening of last week in honor of Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Webster, who 

returned to San Francisco Monday, after a year's residence in Paris. 
SYMMES. — Tuesday evening at Hotel Cecil, Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Symmes 

gave a delightful dinner party. Mr. and Mrs. Whittle are at the 

Hotel Cecil with Mr. and Mrs. Symmes. 
TOBIN. — General and Mrs. John P. Wisser were the complimented guests 

at a prettily appointed dinner given by Captain and Mrs. Wm. H. 

Tobin Wednesday evening at their home at Fort Winfield Scott. 



January 17, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



TEAS. 

CHAMBERS. Mrs. Elisabeth Chambers and Mrs M&ynard E. Wright 
i i tea Friday afteri n In honor of Mis. Prank E, Chase. 

MORSIS. — Mrs. Charles J. Morse was hostess at a bridge tea Wednesday 
afternoon at the General Hospital at the Presidio. 

ROTH. An Friday, January L6th, Mrs. Leon Roto was hostess at a large 
i ridge tea at her home In Broadway in honor of her mother, Mrs. Eld- 
ward Weill, of Chicago. 

WALLACH. 'I'll.- Misses Louise and Helen Wallach gave a pretty tea at 
the Gables Wednesday afternoon, 

PARTIES. 

A VENALL— Saturday evening a delightful surprise party was given to 
Mr. ami Mrs. Lorenzo Avenali. who are only just settled in their at- 
tractive new home on Russian Hill. 

SCOTT. — Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Scott have sent out invitations for a dancing 
party to be given next Tuesday evening, January 20th. 

DANSANT. 

GLASS. — Mr. and Mrs. Frank Glass and Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Nahl have 
issued invitations to a cabaret dansant which they will give Friday 
evening, January 23d. at the Town and Gown Club in Berkeley. 

HOTEL OAKLAND. — Thursday evening, the first of the new series of dan- 
sants was given at the Hotel Oakland, under patronage of a num- 
ber of the most prominent society women here. 

KING. — Mr. and Mrs. Homer King and their daughters, Miss Hazel and 
Miss Genevieve King, entertained at a delightful tea dance at their 
home in Broadway last Thursday week. 

MORRISON. — The Misses Morrison, of San Jose, are spending the week- 
end in town, and Saturday entertained a coterie of their army and 
navy friends at the dansant at the Palace. 

NBILSON. — Mrs. William D. Neilson will be hostess at a dansant at the 
Fairmont on January 24th. 

PALACE HOTEL. — Coincident with the arrival of the peerless Mile. Fav- 
lowa and the Russian Imperial Ballet, is the debut of M. Bronislaw 
Mieczkowski and Mile. Agnes Mahr, two dancers of international re- 
nown, who will give a special exhibition of classical dancing at the 
Palace Hotel on Saturday afternoon, January 17th, at the regular 
dansant. 

BENEFIT FOR GIRLS' RECREATION CLUB. 

AMONG THOSE attending "Within the Law" at the Court Theatre Tues- 
day night for the benefit of the Girls' Recreation Club were: Mr. and 
Mrs. Templeton Crocker had Mr. and Mrs. Cheever Cowdin. Mr. and 
Mrs. Arthur Ghesebrough, Miss Marian Newhall and George Nickel. — 
With Mr. and Mrs. Charles Deering were Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lom- 
bard and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Farquharson. — Miss Josselyn, in the 
absence of William B. Bourns, had their box. and her guests, among 
others, included Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Grant, Mr. and Mrs. Breeze, 
Miss Emily Parrott and Mr. Caetani. — Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Martin's 
guests were Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. Tobin and Miss Virginia Jolliffe. — 
Mrs. Eleanor Martin had with her Colonel and Mrs. J. T. Knight. 
Miss Margaret Knight, Samuel Knight, Captain Harry Howland and 
Lieutenant Howell. —Mr. and .Mrs. IliM.-n'!' Morgan -ntei tained Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles S. Fee, Miss Eleanor Morgan and Miss Flora Low. — Mr. 
and Mrs. George Aimer Newhall had at their box Mr. and Mrs. John S. 
I hum and Mr. and Mrs. Mount ford Wilson. — Miss Anna Peters had 
with her i\iiss Sadie Murray. Lieutenant > 't'U^.T Pratt, twClss Helen 
Nicol, Captain and Mrs. John B. Murphy, the MiBses Enid Qregg, Har- 
riet Alexander, and Lieutenants William Simpson. Charles K. N 
Captain Herberl Bresa and Stuart Haldorn. — Mr, and Mis. u 

I >. Plllsbury entl'liaimil in honor ot' thHr relatives. Mi. and Mrs. John 

Taylor of Boston, having In addition Lieutenant and Mrs, Maxwell 
Murray, Dr, Tracy Russell and Peres King, Mr. and Mn 
Pope had a party, and Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Kohl also entertained 
some oi their friends, Mr, and Mis. James Shea had Mrs. a. Parrell, 
Miss Kail Mn- 1 1 Parrell, Mr. Bryan and Dion Holm.— Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Smith had Mr. and Mrs. Frank West di and 

Messrs. u. p. Schwerln, Wellington Qregg and Majoi J C Qlli 

Mi ami Mrs. Augustus Taylor had a h<<\ with Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph 
Sprockets and Mr. and Mis Henry Poster DuttOK Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam H. Taylor's parts Included Mr and Mrs Frederick MoNear, Miss 
Marion Zelle, Stnart Lowers and Kenneth U 

AT THE HOTELS. 

DHL MONTK. --'I'll.- many friends of Mr and Ml*. Henry lv Moore, of 

Los Angelea, are very glad to welcome their return to Del Monte 
on Thursday. Thej w< - In December, and ai-e 

planning to be here the balance of the month at least.— Mr. and Mrs. 

W. A I'eWilt, of New York I fOT ■ f«W d 

Dei Monte was ver> busy for the past three days entertaining visitors 
from Canada* who arrived by special trains. One came in Friday 

Ding, the other Saturday, leaving Sunday afternoon for Santa 

Barbara, All the party took the 17-rolle drive, and enjoyed them- 
selves in various wa\s in the beautiful grounds, There was a 

dance arranged for them on Friday, and also Saturday evening. The 
new dances are becoming • have 

started up, and the management Ised to arrange for the 

dansants. Word has be< d that Mr. and Mrs. Kinsley. 

of v,.. Rhode island, will arrive al Del Mont.- n> ■ fee 

PACIFIC OROVB. Miss i: Palmer, of Berkeley, R A Burgue and Jas. 
r. Hogan of Ban Francisco w D McCleUan of San Francisco, Wm. 

Martin Of Oakland, <J- B. Hamilton and A. EL Spencer of San Fran- 

P, a. r*n. lues and \v. K. Humphries of Los A ngeles , registered 

during the week. F. M, Johns and Mis. .1 IV LoomlS, Of Chicago, are 

early tourists having dona Southern California - Mr H. F. V, Maskell, 
of Vai who has been for the last two weeks at Del 

Monte, has taken apartments at this hO< WHO of 

his friends that live in the <: 



ARRIVALS. 
BOXIRDETTE The Mr , turned rrom San .lose 

■ nl the holidays with theli Bister, Mrs, i. Hartraann 

l "' 1 ' ' Mr «- Arthur .,., ■ ■;,-.,., ,,i the Hotel SI 

u ' ;i '-- ' ; ■ urned from b brii I * Isll In I 

SMITH.— Lieutenanl Bmorj Smith arrived on Shermi i 

Tuesday, and will be with the former's mother, Mn W n Bmlth 

at the Hotel Cecil. 
WILSON- Mr. and Mrs. Mountford S. Wilson have ,- to town to spend 

1 week with Mr. and Mrs. George Aimer Newhall al their home In 

Paicflc avenue. 

DEPARTURES. 

BAKER.— Mr. and Mrs, George Barr Baker departed for New York Thurs- 
day of last week after a most enjoyabli visit of a month, 

CASEY.— Mr. and Mrs. Harold Casey have g ■ to Coronado to remain 

until February 1st. 

FAY.— Mr. and Mrs Roland Faj have returned to their home in Berkeley. 
after having spent a few days in Burllngame with Dr. and Mrs Max 
Rothschild. 

HOFF.-Mr. and Mrs. J. Hon! of San Francisco left last week for an 
Eastern trip. They will visit several cities en route. 

KNOWLAND.— Congressman Joseph R. Knowland and Mrs. Knowland, 
with Miss Eleanor Knowland, left this week for Washington. D. C. 

LYMAN.— Mrs. Joseph C. Lyman has left San Francisco to reside in Los 
Angeles permanently. 

WILSON.— Mr. and Mrs. Mountford S. Wilson have returned to their home 
in Burlingame, after having spent a few days in town. 

INTIMATIONS. 

BARENT.— Miss Lillian Barent, who has been living in the East, will re- 
turn to San Francisco shortly. 
BLACK.— Miss Marie Louise Black expects to leave on the 23d for New 

York. 
BLANDING.— Miss Henrietta Blanding is at Sheperd's Hotel in Cairo, 

enjoying the winter at the gay resort city on the Nile. 
HELLMAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Marco Hellman will be in Berlin for the next 

few weeks. 
HILL. — Mrs. Horace Hill, Jr., is expected home within a fortnight. 
HOLMAN.— Mr. and Mrs. C. Devens Holman. who have been residing at 

the Hotel Bellevue, are established at their new home in Jackson 

street. 
KEARNY. —During Mr. and Mrs. Bishop's absence, their home in Bu- 
" chanan street will be occupied by Mrs. Philip Kearny, who has come 

from Santa Barbara to spend a few weeks en route to Europe. 
NEILSON. — The dansant which Mrs. William Delaware Nielson will give 

at the Fairmont on January 24th, is to be preceded by a reception to 

meet Mr. and Mrs. Felton Elkins. 
SHREVE. — Mr. and Mrs. George Shreve and the Misses Rebecca and 

Elizabeth Shreve returned last Monday to their home in San Mateo. 
STERN. — Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund Stern are at the Ritz-Carlton in New 

York, where they have been guests since their arrival from Europe. 

Dr. Clyde Payne and Dr. Eugene Payne, Dentists, have resumed 

practice at 116 Grant avenue. Telephone Kearny 66. Hours: 9 to 4. 



THE BALMACAAN 

Quite the proper thing with young 
men and many older ones. A loose, roomy 
coat of smart lines, 44 to 48 inches long— 
button-to-neck collar, with raglan or kim- 
ona sleeves. All cravenet- 
ted. Comes in rough home- 
spuns, tweeds and cheviots. 

Priced 

$25 to $40 

The $Pulb 

Chas.Keilus $Co.(incj 

726- MARKET STREET 




16 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 17, 1914. 




Andrew Mack at the Alcazar 
next week. 



ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Alcazar. — On next Mon- 
day night, January 19th, 
Andrew Mack, the premiere 
interpreter of the Irish 
drama, will commence a 
limited starring engage- 
ment, supported by the Al- 
cazar players and five spe- 
cially engaged artists, at the 
Alcazar Theatre, opening 
in Theodore Burt Sayre's 
beautiful romance of the 
Emerald Isle, "Tom 
Moore," a play founded on 
the life and adventures of 
the immortal Irish poet. 

As an interpreter of Irish 
plays, especially those of a 
romantic character, Mr. 
Mack is without a peer in 
the world. His success in 
the East during the past 
few seasons has prevented 
any Western engagements 
of consequence, and the 
fact that he is now aban- 
doning the extreme temp- 
tation of a vaudeville salary of $3,000 a week speaks for the 
high regard he has for the sort of entertainment that lies closest 
to his heart. Supporting Mr. Mack will be all the Alcazar 
favorites, together with Louise Hamilton, one of the most beau- 
tiful women on the American stage, Annie Mack Berlein, Ed- 
ward McCormick, B. T. Henderson and W. J. Townsend. 

* * * 

Kohler & Chase Hall. — The soloist for the regular weekly 
Matinee of Music which will be given under the direction of 
Kohler & Chase on Saturday afternoon, January 17th, will be 
Mrs. Richard Rees, soprano. Mrs. Rees has been for a number 
of years one of California's most favorite and able concert ar- 
tists. Her services are constantly so much in demand that she 
often is unable to fill several important engagements. She pos- 
sesses a singularly clear and exquisitely flexible voice and sings 
with that artistic finesse which appeals to every one. In addi- 
tion to the splendid solos by Mr. Rees, there will be a number 
of very delightful instrumental compositions which are to be 
rendered on the Knabe Player Piano and on the Pipe Organ. 

San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. — Dvorak, Chadwick, 
Debussy and Mendelssohn, with Corihne Frada, pianist, to 
assist Conductor Hadley and the San Francisco Symphony Or- 
chestra in an exposition of the beauties set forth in the Men- 
delssohn concert for pianoforte and grand orchestra, make 
next Friday's program for the seventh symphony concert at 
the Cort Theatre one of great musical value. Miss Corinne 
Frada, the soloist Friday afternoon, is but thirteen years of age, 
and has the distinction of being the youngest artist to appear 
with the orchestra. That the music committee made no mistake 
in engaging Miss Frada was proven conclusively at Miss 
Frada's rehearsal with the orchestra last Monday morning, the 
young pianist being the recipient of approval from the entire 
orchestra. 

Seats for the concert will go on sale next Monday at the box 
offices of Sherman, Clay & Co., Kohler & Chase, and the Cort 
Theatre. The prices will be from 75 cents to $2. 

* * * 

Orpheum. — The Orpheum announces another splendid and 
novel program for next week. Frank Keenan, the famous 
American character actor, and a capable little company will 
appear in Willard Mack's one-act play, "Vindication," which 
enbles Mr. Keenan, in the role of a Confederate Colonel and 
a veteran of the Civil War, to present one of those life-like 
portraits he has the power to create at will. 

Fred Lindsay, Australian bushman, will adapt sensational 
feats of swordsmanship to the stock whip. 

Edna Showalter, late prima donna of the New York Metro- 
politan Opera House Company, will sing favorite operatic 
selections. 



Albert Von Tilzer, whose name is a household word as a 
composer of popular songs, will, with the assistance of Dorothy 
Nord, sing a number of songs. 

Sharp and Turek will impersonate the city negro and also 
indulge in song and dance. 

Next week will be the last of Bert Fitzgibbon and Martin 

Johnson's Travalogues. It will also conclude the engagement 

of Maurice and Florence Walton, who will present the Brazilian 

Maxixe, the Skating Waltz, the Tango and the Eccentric One 

Step. 

» * * 

Gaiety. — The principal fun makers now in "The Girl at the 
Gate" are Bickel and Watson, but the management has seen to 
it that the final ten performances of the piece will outshine in 
attractiveness any of their predecessors. Two stunning new 
acts have been engaged for this week. First there are the Mar- 
velous Millers, whose dancing abilities are hardly eclipsed by 
any of those now basking in the lurid light of publicity. These 
clever steppers make their bow at Sunday's matinee perform- 
ance, and at the same time Bert Howard and Effie Lawrence 
will join the Gaiety Company in their comedy and singing 
specialties. 

The Gaiety will be "dark" Sunday the 25th inst., and will 
re-open on Monday week with what is confidently expected to 
be the sensation thus far of its career — no less than the starring 
of that magnificent comedienne, Marie Dressier herself, in her 
new musical revue, "The Merry Gambol," with a company of 
seventy. 

* * * 

Columbia Theatre. — The first performance of "Kismet," by 
Otis Skinner and the large supporting company under the direc- 
tion of Klaw and Erlanger and Harrison Grey Fiske at the 
Columbia Theatre last Monday night was one of the most bril- 
liant occasions, both theatrically and socially, of recent seasons, 
in the theatres of San Francisco. One of the very great charms 
of the presentation is the perfection of detail in the matter of 
scenery, costumes and accessories as well as the perfect group- 




Otis Skinner, who is appearing in Edward Knoblauch's 
Arabian Nights play, "Kismet," in the role of "Hajj, the Beg- 
gar of Bagdad," at the Columbia Theatre. 

ings and ihe management of the pageants. These perfections 
are due to the skill of Harrison Grey Fiske, who staged the pro- 
duction in America. 

The engagement of Otis Skinner in "Kismet" at the Columbia 
Theatre will continue throughout this week and next week. 
Matinees are given on Wednesday and Saturday. The final 
performance will be given on Saturday night, January 24th. 



January 17, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



Tivoli. — A motion picture of extraordinary interest is "The 
Battle of Shiloh," which will be shown for the first time in this 
city at the Tivoli for the week commencing Sunday. The 
story, which is told in four reels, is one of love and war, and is 
full of historical personages, including General Grant, of the 
Federal Service, and General Johnston, commander of the 
Confederate forces. At the beginning of hostilities, Tom 
Winston, despite the pleadings of his sister, Ellen, who is an ar- 
dent Confederate, goes north and acquires a commission in the 
Federal army. Frank Carey has entered the Confederate ser- 
vice, though his sister, Ethel, furiously denounces him as a 
traitor, and asserts her intention of herself serving the Union 
cause. Both girls become identified with the secret service de- 
partments of the North and South, The ensuing complications 
prove exciting, and the end of the story is thrilling and satis- 
factory. Comedy films will vary the program. 

Savoy. — One of the most thrilling and awe-inspiring mo- 
ments of George Kleine's glorious production of the Cines 
Photo-Drama, "Antony and Cleopatra," which will enter upon 
its third and last week here at the Savoy Theatre Monday, is 
when the Egyptian queen orders her slave thrown to the croco- 
diles of the Nile for daring to have fallen in love with Marc 
Antony. The picture is realistic in the extreme, and the huge 
monsters are seen swimming about the stream, which flows at 
the foot of the palace steps, lying in wait for any articles of 
food that may be thrown to them. At the Queen's signal, a 
powerful slave throws the girl into the waters, and the croco- 
diles make one dive for her, all disappearing into the depths of 
the river. Matinees are given daily at half past two, with 
evening performances at eight-thirty, and the music furnished 
by Hans Koenig and associates is delightful. 

"The Traffic in Souls," a motion picture that is a sensation of 
New York, follows "Antony and Cleopatra." 



Orpheum 



SHORTR1DGE FOR THE SENATE. 

With the retirement of Hon. George C. Perkins from the 
United States Senate at the end of the present term, the State 
of California will suffer a distinct loss. During his long and 
honorable service, Senator Perkins has acquired a standing and 
influence which has enabled him to accomplish much for the 
benefit of the State and to wield a strong influence among his 
colleagues in the shaping of national legislation. 

That the splendid prestige thus acquired for California in 
the councils of the nation may be retained, it is essential that 
his successor should be a man not alone well informed in the 
affairs of State, but one so capable of expressing his thoughts 
as to command the attention of his colleagues. Undoubtedly no 
man in the State of California more fully meets these important 
requirements than does Hon. Samuel M. Shortridge. A man of 
deep learning, a close student of the affairs of the world, he is 
fully informed in the problems confronting the country and its 
relations to the nations of the world. An orator of marked elo- 
quence, his words will command the attention and respect of 
a body composed of such able men as is even the Senate of the 
United States. Certainly the Republican party could find no 
more worthy nominee for this exalted position. — San Mateo 
Times-Gazette. 



The Dansant in the beautiful court of the Palace Hotel 

on Saturday afternoon, January 17th, promises a surprise in the 
introduction to San Francisco of the justly celebrated dancers, 
M. Moszkowsky and Mme. Agnes Mahr, who will exemplify 
many of the- intricacies of the Russian school. They will ap- 
pear on the floor at 4:45 and 5:45 p. m. The dansant will be 
continued through the dinner hour, so that guests and others 
dining may enjoy the pastime if they so desire. 



Lady patrons of Techau Tavern who have been the re- 
cipients, from time to time, of those attractive little souvenirs 
which the management presents on Saturday afternoons, will 
be interested to learn that, in the near future, an exhibition of 
the famous toilet preparations of the Aubrey Sisters of New 
York will be held on the main floor of this cafe. These cos- 
metics are in high favor all over the United States, and every 
lady should attend this exhibition, the date of which will soon 
be announced. In the meantime. Aubrey Sisters' souvenirs will 
be frequently presented to those ladies who attend the Tavern 
on Saturday afternoons. iaiwi»»»mii 



OFiirri'll Street llet. Stocktonand Powell 
Phone Douglas 70 
' rod tlosl Uagnlflci atre in America 

every day. 
PERFECT VAUDEVILLE 

F RA .?J,¥ ' .... Deny In "Vindication." 

MAY, I'm is Australian Bushman & Stock Whip 

EDNA SHOW VLTBB. "The Qlrlol theGoldi ., \ e"; ILBERT VOS 

American Popular Sons Writer and DOROTHY NORD: SHARP 4 

ii n \,\,.',!,"v V 1 ;:',','-' 1 ""' P a M WTZOIBBOK, The final Daffs 

Dill; MARTIN JOHNSON'S TRAVELOGI i: WORLD'S NEWS IN MOTION 
< ■■"> Week MAURICE ^ND FLORENCE WALTON, World's Uosl 

'•''" Ball Room Dancers, New Program 

Evening prices, 10c, 26c, BOc, 76c. Hox seats, $1. Matinee prices 
(except Sundays and holiday! , 26c, 50c. 



Gaiety Theatre 



O'Farron, opposite Orphean 
Phone Sutter mi 
America's Musi, Popular Comedienne 

IRENE FRANKLIN 

Supported by mi Comedians, Singers and Dancers in the Musical Merriment 

THE GIRL AT THE GATE 
Another $2.00 Worth for $1.00. 

PRICES— Nights, Saturday and Sunday Matinees, 26c to $1.00; Thursday 
Matinee, 25c, 50c, 75c. 



Alcazar Theatre 



O'Farreil Street near Powell 

Phone Kearny 2 

Week Commencing, Monday Night. January 19th, Matinees, THURS DAY 

SATURDAY, SUNDAY. 

Engagement Extraordinary of America's Foremost Irish Actor 

ANDREW MACK 
Supported By The ALCAZAR PLAYERS In The Beautiful Romantic Irish Play 

"TOM MOORE" 
Hear Mack Sing The Gems Of Ireland. 
Prices— Night, 25c to$l; Mat. 25c to 50c. 



Savoy' Theatre 



"The Playhouse Beautiful" 
McAllister St. near Market 
Phone Market 130 
MATINEE DAILY AT 2:80 
Mr. George Kleine's Glorious Photo Drama 

ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA 
Every Evening at 8:80. All Seats Reserved, 25c. and 50c. 
NOTE-" ANTONY & CLEOPATRA" will only be seen at the Savoy Theatre 
in San Francisco, 
Monday, January 26— "The Traffic in Souls." 



Columbia Theatre 



Corner Geary and Mason StreetB 
Phone Franklin 15j 

The Leading Playhouse 
BEGINNING MONDAY JANUARY 1U — LAST SIX NIGHTS — MATINEES. 
WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY. Klaw and Erlanger Present 
OTIS SKINNER 
( By Arrangement with Charles Frohman ) 
In "An Arabian Night" 
KISMET 
Produced and Managed by Harrison Grey Fiske. 
25— The Musical Comedy Triumph "ADELE." 
Saturday Matinee, 25c to $2. 



By Edward KnoMauch. 
Sunday Night. January 
PRICES— Evenings and 
Wednesday Matinee. 25c to $1.50. 



Tivoli Photo Theatre 



Eddy Street near Market 
Photo-Plays de Luxe 
Saturday— Last Times of THOR, LORD OF THE JUNGLES 
One Week, Starting Sunday: 

THE BATTLE OF SHILOH 
A Story of Ltr?6 and War. Continuous. 12 M. to II P. M., Daily. Matinees. 
10c; Evenings, 10c and JOc. 



SVMphoNY 

ORCHESTRA 

Henry h holey Conductor. 



CORT— FRIDAY. JANUARY 28, 8 P. II. 

s.il.iiM-CORINNE FRADA (Pianist) 

I'rogram Includes; Dvoms Overture. "Nature." Mendelssohn; Concerto fur 

Pianoforte No. i. <; Minor, ctuuiwick "symphonic sketches," Debussy 

jtral Ski ti has), "The Sea." 
PICKETS— 75c to 12.00: !!"\. Logs Seats 18.00. s,-nts on snlf Monday at Box 
a Sherman. Claj & Co.. ECohler ,v Chase and Cort Theatre. 



HOTEL SHATTUCK 

FIREPROOF 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Thirty-five Minutes From San Francisco 

$3.00 per day American Plan $1.50 per day European Plan 



TELEPHONE PROSPECT 1973 

OLITA LUNT YOUNGBERG 

Pupils received for the modern dances. Rag, Tango, 
Hesitation Waltz, Relaxation, Grace Culture. Interpre- 
tation of Song. 

1443 POLK STREET STUDIO 11 

SKETCHES IN VAUDEVILLE FURNISHED 



Gouraud's Oriental Beauty Leaves 

A dainty- little booklet of exquisitely perfumed powdered leave* to 
carry in the purse. A handy article for all occasions to quickly Im- 
prove the complexion. Sent for 10 cents In stamps or coin. F. T. Hop- 
kins. 37 Great Jonea SL. N. V. 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 17, 1914. 






IFINANCIAV 



Better Conditions in A $2,000,000 call for gold export to 
Security Market. Paris during the middle of the week 

caused hesitation in the list for a 
day or so, and there was scattered realizing; the undertone, 
however, continued strong, and a generally more optimistic 
tone pervades the New York and Boston market. This is re- 
flected in a better demand for bonds, a sign of fundamental 
improvement for which the best market experts have been anx- 
iously scanning the financial horizon for a long time past. 
Washington continues to be the center of sharp interest on ac- 
cout of Wilson's forthcoming message on prospective trust 
legislation; the document is expected to be conservative and 
to assist business. This belief was accentuated during the 
week by reports of Cabinet conferences along such lines. The 
country generally believes that the President is trying his best 
to excise the evils of the old trust system in a way to cause 
the least strain on the business community. This month is ex- 
pected to see the turn of the tide in unfulfilled steel tonnage, 
which declined steadily through 1913. Experts are already be- 
ginning to predict that there will be a great industrial awaken- 
ing before the close of the year. This month has already 
placed over 10,000 men at work in iron and other mills in the 
Eastern and Southern States. Abroad the situation is slightly 
better; the difficulties there are more handicapped by labor 
troubles than in this country, where they are of a sporadic char- 
acter. In South Africa, martial law has been proclaimed, fol- 
lowing the vote of the trades federation and Rand miners to 
order a general strike. 



Heavier Sales in 
Local Securities. 



Spring Valley, Associated Oil, 
Union Oil, Paci. Gas & Electric, and 
a number of other leading issues in 
their respective lines, became fea- 
tures in a better movement this week. Spring Valley bonds 
showed the best activity in a long while under the assumption 
that the city will take over the property of the company before 
maturity, in which case the bonds, whether left out or ex- 
changed, will have the value of a municipal bond. Union Oil 
advanced some 17 points on the report that the exercise of the 
General Petroleum option is off. Rumors to the contrary are 
abroad, and representatives of General Petroleum are still in 
Los Angeles, but creditable information is to the effect that 
other business is being attended to. A reflection of this con- 
dition is shown in the fact that General Petroleum issues eased 
off this week. Associated Oil recovered a set-back, and again 
advanced sharply to the surprise of the street. The report of 
the prospective sale of the control of the property to the Shell- 
Royal Dutch interests proved to be a canard. Brokers who 
have studied the prospects of the company are a unit in de- 
claring that the advance in the price of the stock is based on a 
very satisfactory treasury condition, which is rapidly accumu- 
lating under the profits arising from the thriving business due 
to the increasing demand for California oil. Aside from the 
usual scattered weak spots in the list, the tone of the market 
and the business handled for the week was distinctively better. 



Delegates to the International 
Local Interest in the Waterways Congress are beginning 
Waterways Congress. to gather in this city, and holders 

of first and second mortgage securi- 
ties, based on more than 1,000,000 acres of fertile land in the 
Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys should watch the proceed- 
ings of this body in order to help it if possible. Its object is 
reclamation and the improvement of our inland navigable 
waters and the presentation of the natural requirements to the 
national government in a form to attract its interest. Financial 
support to the extent of at least one-third is expected on the 
total cost of reclaiming the Sacramento valley under the general 
reclamation plan which has been adopted by the State. The 



California Debris Commission's inclusive estimate for the 
whole is $20,000,000, of which about one-third is apportioned 
strictly for river work. It is hoped that one-third of this amount 
will be furnished by the government as an aid to the Sacra- 
mento and its tributaries. Many of these tributaries have no 
railroad service and proper water transportation would aid 
greatly in the development of those areas of the State. Trans- 
portation on the Sacramento River has been advancing in leaps 
with the improvement of that waterway, which means that set- 
tlers along the course are reaping benefits in cheaper transpor- 
tation. Holders of mortgage securities along these routes 
should lend an active hand in furthering any activities de- 
veloped in the present International Waterways Congress. 



The outcome of the year 1913 in citrus fruits was far 

better than the first quarter given any promise. While the cold 
snap of one year ago cut the product nearly in half, this did not 
discourage growers. Results so far this season give very good 
promise. The shipments to December 15, 1913, were 4,150 
carloads, against 3,928 for 1912. A larger per centage in in- 
creased shipments are expected this month. The groves have 
been very much extended, and in a short time the returns are 
expected to be very greatly enlarged. The deciduous fruit sea- 
son closed with shipments aggregating $18,500,000 in value, 
almost reaching the value of California's gold product for the 
same period, $20,000,000. Over 13,330 carloads of this fruit 
have been shipped to date. 



The eleven associated savings banks of San Francisco 

show a gain in resources between January 31, 1913, and Decem- 
ber 24, 1913, of $9,217,981. These dates mark the calls made 
upon the banks by the State Superintendent of Banks. The 
resources of these banks on December 24, 1913, were $207,- 
226,717, as compared with $203,893,968 on June 4, 1913; $198,- 
008,736, January 31, 1913; $190,540,625, June 14, 1912; and 
$179,996,742, June 7, 1911. 



FOREST NOTES. 

The government has just sold 43,000 cords of cedar wood for 
shingles from the Washington national forest. The shingles 
manufactured from this wood, laid six inches to the weather, 
would cover two and one-half square miles of roof. 

The navy department has asked the forest service to investi- 
gate guijo, a Philippine wood, for possible use in decking boats 
and ships. Long-leaf pine, sugar maple and beech are the do- 
mestic woods most used for decks. 

The State university lands in Arizona are to be lumbered un- 
der a co-operative agreement between the government and the 
State Land Commission. Arizona is the first State in the South- 
west, and one of few in the country, to cut its timbered lands 
on forestry principles. 

The annual meeting of the American Forestry Association 
was held in Washington on January 14th. A president, twenty- 
one vice-presidents, a treasurer, an auditor, and five directors 
were elected, and plans for an active campaign for forest con- 
servation during 1914 were made. The association has 8,000 
members. 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

Established lis* 

SUTRO & CO. 

410 Montgomery Street 

Detailed Information in Retard to Any Security 

Will be FurnUhed Upon Request 

Members— The San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange 



TELEPHONE DOUGLAS 2487 

E. F. HUTTON & CO. 

THE PIONEER HOUSE 

INVESTMENT BONDS 

490 California Street 

Branch ST. FRANCIS HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO 
Members Two Private Wires to 

New York Stock Exchange Chicago and New York 

New York Cotton Exchange Denver, 714 Seventeenth Street 

New York Coffee Exchange Los Angeles, 112 W. Third Street 

Chicago Board of Trade New York, 31-33-35 New Street 






January 17, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



19 




PAST AND PRESENT. 

I remember, I remember 
The house where I was born, 
The little window where the sun 
Came peeping in at morn ; 
He never came a wink too soon 
Nor brought too long a day; 
But now, I often wish the night 
Had born my breath away. 

I remember, I remember 
The roses, red and white, 
The violets, and the lily-cups — 
Those flowers made of light ! 
The lilacs where the robins built, 
And where my brother set 
The laburnum on his birth-day — 
The tree is living yet! 

I remember, I remember 

Where I was used to swing, 

And thought the air must rush as fresh 

To swallows on the wing; 

My spirit flew in feathers then 

That is so heavy now, 

And summer pools could hardly cool 

The fever on my brow. 

I remember, I remember 

The fir trees dark and high; 

I used to think their slender tops 

Were close against the sky : 

It was a childish ignorance, 

But now 'tis little joy 

To know I'm farther off from Heaven 

Than when I was a boy. 



-T. Hood. 



ODE ON A LYCIAN TOMB. 



What gracious nunnery of grief is here! 

One woman garbed in sorrow's every mood; 
Each sad presentment celled apart, in fear 

Lest that herself upon herself intrude, 
And break some tender dream of sorrow's day, 
Here cloistered lonely, set in marble gray. 

O pale procession of immortal love, 

Forever married to immortal grief! 
All of life's childlike sorrow far above, 

Past help of time's compassionate relief; 
These changeless stones are treasuries of regret 
And mock the term by time for sorrow set. 

Cold mourners — set in stone so long ago. 

Too much my thoughts have dwelt with thee apart. 
Again my grief is young; full well I know 

The pang reborn, that mocked my feeble art 
With that too human wail in pain expressed, 
The parent cry above the empty nest. 

—Dr. S. Weir Mitchell. 



WHEN LINCOLN CAME TO WASHINGTON. 
The fourth of March, 1861, has seen Mr. Lincoln successfully 
installed as President of the United States, despite all predic- 
tions to the contrary. For the first time in the history of the 
United States it has been found necessary to conduct the Presi- 
dent-elect to the Capital surrounded by bayonets, and with 
loaded canons at different points on the route, where it was 
feared his passage might be obstructed — all of which added to 
the display, if it detracted as much from preconceived ideas of 
the inauguration of the President of a free republic. From 
early in the morning the tramp of the troops could be heard, 
and dashing aids in showy uniforms seem urging their horses 
almost to full speed and looking as if the fate, not only of the 
United States, but of the universe, depended on their individual 
efforts. "Masons" and "Odd Fellows" with marshals of 
the city and marshals of the day were running against one an- 
other at every corner, sublimely unconscious of everything but 
their destination. By nine the street in front of Willard's Hotel 
was lined with troops as far as the eye could see, and there they 
remained under arms until Mr. Lincoln appeared, leaning on 
the arm of Mr. Buchanan, who had previously driven down the 
avenue in his own carriage unattended. As soon as Mr. Lincoln 
stepped into the carriage that was to convey him to the Capitol, 
the troops presented arms, the band struck up "Dixie," and the 
sun, which had been under a light cloud all the morning, shone 
with undiminished splendor, as if nothing should be wanting to 
give effect to the moment. It was a scene never to be forgotten, 
atid seemed to make an unwonted impression on the spectators, 
hushing into silence for the instant every dissentient voice. 
As the carriage, which might be said to contain the destiny 
of the United States, disappeared, the troops filed after it, fol- 
lowed by. an immense throng of people of all ages and both 
sexes eagerly hurrying to the Capitol, where a platform had 
been erected outside of the building, from which Mr. Lincoln, 
after taking the oath of office as President of the United States, 
addressed them. I was not near enough to hear what he said, 
but on that sea of faces turned toward him I could read every 
variety of expression from exultation to despair, and felt long 
before I knew positively that there was no hope for the South. 
The remainder of the day was a gloomy one for all parties ; the 
excitement of the morning had passed away, leaving reflection, 
that enemy to all present enjoyment, with dark forebodings 
to overshadow our future. 

The Inauguration Ball. The dullest of all balls — scarcely a 
familiar face to be seen. The haut ton did not come out, be- 
cause "the Lincolns are not yet the fashion." The strangers 
who patronized the affair tried to make the most of it, but the 
room, or tent, was arranged with so little taste and was so badly 
lighted that it required a brilliant imagination to fancy enjoy- 
ment in such a scene. Mr. Douglas opened the ball with Mrs. 
Lincoln, who looked extremely well in a light blue "moire," 
but did not seem to be in good spirits — and it is said she re- 
marked that it had been the most unhappy day of her life. — 
Harper's Magazine. 

The Tango skirt has arrived. It is merely a pair of 

trousers in disguise. 

SUNSET LIMITED * 



The attorney for the gas company was making a popular 

address. "Think of the good the gas company has done!" he 
cried. "If I were permitted a pun, I would say, in the words of 
the immortal poet, 'Honor the Light Brigade.' " Voice of a 
consumer from the audience: "Oh, what a charge they made!' 
— Youth's Companion. 



I ^&&£ 



Connecting with 



i 



^' -rt^mj^'^k NEW YORK & NEW g 
* ^ ORLEANS LIMITED g 



TRAINS DE LUXE. NO EXCESS FARE * 

S 4/ 2 days NEW YORK *& days I 

£ A Delightful Winter Trip Through The Balmy South g 

For Particulars Address 2 

J. N. HARRISON \ 

Pacific Coast Passenger Agent y 



5 874 Market Street 



San Francisco ^ 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 17, 1914. 




IN9VMCE 




J. B. Levison is a native of Nevada. In 1878 he began his 
underwriting career in the office of the New Zealand Insurance 
Company. In the fall of 1880 he was appointed marine clerk 
of the general insurance agency of Hutchinson & Mann (later 
Mann & Wilson), which position he occupied until the organiza- 
tio of the Anglo-Nevada Insurance Company, when he took 
charge of the marine department of that company, and in 1888 
was made its marine secretary. When the marine business of 
the Anglo-Nevada was taken over by the Fireman's Fund in 
October, 1890, Mr. Levison was elected to the position of 
marine secretary of the latter company, and in January, 1900, 
was made second vice-president. 

* * * 

The Western States Life paid for more than $5,500,000 of 
new business last year, which is a twenty-five per cent advance 
over the amount written during 1912. The company's assets at 
the close of the year were over $1,600,000. The following pro- 
motions are announced by Vice-President Saunders: C. B. 
Beaumont, agency organizer at home office to have charge of 
Central California territory, with headquarters at Sacramento; 
W. J. Pitman, organizer at home office, to be district manager 
in the southern San Joaquin district, with headquarters at 
Fresno; M. E. Long to be district manager at Stockton; C. B. 
Rome, district manager at San Jose; and George L. Munson, 
district manager at Santa Rosa. 

* * * 

G. J. Roth has succeeded special agent Rod E. Smith as field 
man for the Northern Assurance, covering the Pacific North- 
west. S. J. Norton, special agent for the same company in 
Nebraska, has been transferred to the mountain field, succeed- 
ing Frank D. Welpton, who has been assigned to the Pacific 
Northwest, with headquarters at Seattle. 

* * * 

The annual banquet of the Life Underwriters' Association of 
San Francisco took place at the Hotel Stewart on the evening 
of January 8th, and was attended by the majority of the mem- 
bers and several distinguished guests. The proceedings were 
unusually interesting. 

* # * 

John W. Whittington has resigned from the Los Angeles firm 
of Whittington & Collins, general agents of the Pacific Mutual 
Life, and accepted an appointment as general agent for the 
National Life Insurance Company, U. S. A., for Southern Cali- 
fornia. 

* * * 

The three days' convention of the San Francisco Life Insur- 
ance Company's One Hundred Thousand Dollar Club termi- 
nated on the evening of January 7th, with a banquet in the Red 
Room of the St. Francis Hotel after the agents had been royally 
entertained during the two previous days. There were about 
one hundred in attendance. 

* * * 

Walter R. Vail, of Vail & Eldridge, who has been in attend- 
ance upon the convention of Provident Life and Trust agents at 
Philadelphia, will return early in February. 

* * * 

Articles of incorporation have been filed in Reno of the Ne- 
vada Life Insurance Company, capital stock ^100,000. The 
incorporators are W. M. McCaffery, C. T. Bender, Geo. A. Tay- 
lor, Robert M. Price, Charles Gulling and Dr. S. C. Gibson. 

* * * 

Nye Kern, formerly insurance manager for Murphy Faere & 
Co., of Spokane, will take the field for the Law Union and Rock 
and Union Assurance, under Manager H. H. Smith, covering 
Eastern Washington, Idaho and Montana, with headquarters at 
Spokane, Wash. Mr. Kern succeeds Special Agent I. M. Fisher. 

* * * 

George A. Yocum has been appointed special agent for the 
Phoenix of London and the Pelican Assurance for Northern 
California and Nevada with headquarters at San Francisco. 
Mr. Yocum is appointed to succeed George F. Roberts. 



Uncle William Sexton, since June, 1894, general adjuster of 
the Fireman's Fund Insurance Company, will retire from that 
position on February 1st, and Charles R. Thompson, for many 
years special agent of the company in the Northwest, has been 
appointed to the position of general adjuster, and will take up 
his residence in San Francisco. 

* * * 

Elliott S. Miller, who has been appointed general supervisor 
for the Connecticut Life, with headquarters at Los Angeles, 
was formerly in charge of six Western States for the company. 
He established the Seattle and Portland agencies. 

* * * 

Fred H. Fisher, a well known producer, has been engaged by 
the Western Union Life of Spokane. Mr. Fisher was for four- 
teen years with the Mutual Life of New York. 

* * * 

Beginning January 1st, Frank L. Hunter will be advanced 
from the office of metropolitan manager to the position of as- 
sistant manager, under J. L. Fuller, of the Norwich Union's 
Pacific department. 

» «■ * 

General Agent Dixwell Hewitt, of the Hartford's Pacific de- 
partment, has promoted Special Agent George E. Devine to the 

office of superintendent of agencies. 

* * * 

A. S. Rennie has resigned the Chicago management of the 
Security Mutual Life to represent the company in the State of 
Oregon. 

1863 1913 

FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 

Capital $1,500,000 Assets, $10,000,000 

FIRE MARINE AUTOMOBILE 

California and Saniome Streets, San Francisco, California. 

The West Coast Life Ins. Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

A strong, well-managed Institution; organized under the rigid insurance 
aws of California. Its policy forma are clear and explicit, and define and 
<uard the Interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Auk any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forma. 

The Connecticut Fire Ins. Co. 

OP HARTFORD. ESTABLISHED 1860. 
SIXTY-THIRD ANNUAL STATEMENT. 

Ca |il tal 11.000.000 

Total Assets 7.736,110 

Surplus to Policyholders 8,266,021 

Pacific Department: 

The Insurance Exchange San Francisco, Cal. 

Benjamin J. 8mlth, Manager. 
Geo. E. Billings Roy C. Wird Geo. B. Dinsmore J. C. Mensdorner Jimei W. Deis 

GEO. E. BILLINGS CO. 

INSURANCE BROKERS AND AVERAGE ADJUSTERS 
512 California St., San Francisco, Cat. Phone Douglas 2283 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 

(Best In the West) 

Employers' Liability, General Liability. Teams, Elevator. Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass. Accident and Health 
Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 



T. L. Miller. President; 
Health Department. 



L. B. Hoge, General Manager Accident and 



Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. 



January 17, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



Losses by fire in Seattle during the year 1913 exceed the 
average of the previous three years by forty per cent, and ag- 
gregate nearly one million dollars. The unusual figures are 
brought about by the number of fires during the past year in 
which the losses have exceeded $50,000. Of these, there have 
been more than in the last decade. July, one of the warmest 
months of the year, show fire losses of $14,362, while February, 
one of the wettest months of the year, tops the list with $324,- 

093. 

* * * 

E. M. Linville, superintendent of agencies for the Ocean Ac- 
cident, is in San Francisco, looking for a representative for his 
company. He will be here all this week. 

* * * 

Rattlesnakes infesting a country road where work is being 
done constitute an "industrial hazard," and a workman bitten 
by a snake is entitled to compensation from the State industrial 
insurance fund, according to a ruling of the State industrial in- 
surance commissioner of Washington. 

* « * 

Henry B. Tichnor, who was taken from the San Joaquin 
Valley field six months ago and put in training under special 
agent Thompson in the Pacific Northwest, will succeed that 
gentleman in Oregon and Western Idaho for the Fireman's 

Fund. 

* * * 

D. J. Roth has been taken from the office of the London As- 
surance Corporation's Pacific Department by Manager A. W. 
Thornton, and sent to do field work in Oregon, South Idaho and 
Western Washington, succeeding Rod E. Smith, who last week 
resigned to make an extended trip through Europe. 

* * * 

Hereafter all officers of the Fireman's Fund who shall ex- 
ceed the age limit of sixty-five years, will be retired on a pen- 
sion. 

» * * 

The Jersey Fire Underwriters, represented by Chapman & 
Neuman, has retired from California. After February 24th the 
Jersey Underwriters will retire from California, Washington, 

Oregon and British Columbia. 

* * * 

S. J. Norton will succeed Frank D. Welpton as special agent 
for the Northern of London in the mountain field. His head- 
quarters will be at Denver. Mr. Norton has been looking after 
the company's interests in Nebraska. 

* • • 

Manager A. W. Thornton, of the London Assurance, has en- 
tirely recovered from his recent illness that confined him to his 

house for several weeks. 

* * * 

The annual meeting of the Fire Underwriters' Association of 
Salt Lake City took place on January 10th, and was well at- 
tended. 

* * * 

General Agent George H. Tyson is in receipt of a wire from 
the Phoenix Insurance Company of Hartford, showing increase 
in assets of $2,750,000, and in net surplus of $900,000. The 
new statement will show total assets of $14,556,049, and sur- 
plus to policyholders, $7,055,091. 

» * * 

General Agent Geo. H. Tyson is in receipt of a wire from 
the Phoenix Insurance Co., of Hartford, showing increase in 
assets of $2,750,000, and in net surplus $900,000. For the new 
statement for 1914 the total assets are now $14,556,049; sur- 
plus to policyholders, $7,055,091. 



BALDWIN COMPANY'S NEW SALES MANAGER. 

They called it a "resolution feast," but in fact it turned out to 
be a banquet given last week by Mr. E. C. Wood, general mana- 
ger of the Western division of the Baldwin Piano Company, 
with the purpose of introducing to the employees of the com- 
pany Mr. R. L. McFarland, who will act as sales manager of 
the San Francisco branch. Mr. McFarland has hitherto been in 
charge of the Baldwin Company's interests in Los Angeles, 
where he made a great record for executive ability and sales- 
manship. He takes the place in San Francisco heretofore filled 
by Mr. E. M. Guise, who is leaving for the East 



li was believed that the big gray timber wolf is extint in 

California, but Constable Tom Carroll, of Fruitvale, who used 
to be the champion hammer thrower, shot one of these danger- 
ous beasts last week in Moraga Valley, within a few miles of 
Oakland. 








The wonderful land of the Pharaoh* 
The Home of Romance and Mystery 
The Winter Playground of the World 
The Egyptian State Railways have made the 
marvels of ancient Egypt easily accessible by a 
sumptuous service of fast expresses and trains de Luxe, 
serving all noteworthy centers. 

Luxor — 13'^ hours from Cairo Assouan— 19 hoars from Cairo 

Fare, $15.45, including sleeper Fare, $19.95, including sleeper to Luxor 

Up-to-date Hotels. 'Winter Palace and Luxor Hotel, Luxor 

Upper Egypt. Cataract Hotel, Savoy Hotel and Grand Hotel 

Assouan, Upper Egypt. ' 

For illustrated pamphlets, information and tickets, apply to 

American Agency of 

EGYPTIAN STATE RAILWAYS 

281 Fifth Avenue, New York City, or (o any local Steamship Agency 



NORTH GERMAN LLOYD 

LONDON- -PARIS- -BREMEN 

♦fBarbarossa January 10 George Washington January 31 

♦Scharnhorsl January 17 Kaiser Wilhelm d.Grosse February 10 

ECronpriezessln < lecilte January 20 *Bremen February 12 

*Koenig Albert January 27 *Bremen direct. UOne Cabin (II). 

Baltimore - Bremen direct. One - cabin (11); Wednesdays. Sailing on 
SATURDAY for THE MEDITERRANEAN 

Prinzess Irene, Thursday Jan. 8j Berlin, Jan. SI, Through rates from 
Now York t-» SOUTH AMERICA via Europe. Egypt, India and the 
Kar East. Independent trips 

AROUND THE WORLD, $652.30 
First Class throughout. Three winter cruises to the 

WEST INDIES & PANAMA CANAL 

I'.y 8. S, "GROSSES EUEFUEEST" 

JANUARY 14 FEBRUARY 12 MARCH 19 

Rate $160 up— 21 to 29 Days 

Cruises [nolude all ports of interest in the West Indies. Write for our 

ii. ■« booklet. "TO THE CANA1, AND CAIUBISKAN." 

Travelers' Checks Good All Over the World. 
OKLRICHS & CO.. General Igts.. 5 Broadway N.Y.i Robert Capelle, General 
Pacific Coast Agent. 250 Powell St.. near St. Francis Hotel and Geary St., 
San Frani 



PERFECT HEARING 

FOR THE 

DEAF 

Little Gem Ear Phone and Auto Massage 

For the accommodation of those who were unable to 
have a demonstration last week of this wonderful little 
instrument, demonstrations will be continued all this 
week at our Post Street store. 

CALIFORNIA OPTICAL COMPANY 



HONOLULU "Via The Sunshine Belt" 

S. S. SIBERIA - (18,000 Tons) 
Sails— Thursday— January 22 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED LITERATURE ON THE ORIENT 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

384 Flood Building, San Francisco, Phone Kearny 3620 



181 POST STREET 
2508 MISSION STREET 
1321 BROADWAY. OAKLAND 



SAN FRANCISCO 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 17. 1914. 




Strangers Within Our Gates. 

"The Immigration Problem," by Jeremiah W. Jenks and W. 
Jeff Lauck, is a monumental work now in its third edition, re- 
vised and enlarged. It deals with the problem, "How does im- 
migration affect American civilization now, and what is its in- 
fluence likely to be in the future." The book is based on the 
report of the United States Immigration Commission, which 
devoted four years to study and investigation of the problem. 
This report fills forty-two volumes, but its results and conclu- 
sions are intelligently and clearly set forth in the work of Jenks 
and Lauck. The book is one of timely interest in California, 
in view of the prospective influx of European labor to follow 
on the opening of the Panama Canal. A large section of the 
work is devoted to the problems growing out of Asiatic immi- 
gration to the Pacific Coast, and the objections to the same 
from the American point of view. 

As it now appears, this work of over 550 pages may be_ ac- 
cepted as absolutely authoritative and reliable, along lines 
covered by no other single volume, and as to important socio- 
logical and racial questions treated elsewhere, only in the forty- 
two bulky books of report made to the government by the Im- 
migration Commission. Even in those, the expert opinions of 
Dr. Jenks and Professor Lauck are lacking, as also the facts 
and views presented by other experts associated with them. 

"The Immigration Problem," by Jeremiah W. Jenks, Ph. D., 
LL. D., and W. Jett Lauck. Third edition, revised, enlarged. 
Price, $1.75 net. Funk & Wagnalls Company, Publishers, New 
York. 



Jack London, as Seen by Himself. 

There is published in an English periodical a brief sketch of 
Jack London's life written by himself. Jack London is already 
well known in this country, but there are nevertheless some in- 
teresting facts presented in this article, particularly as they 
come at first hand. It is from this "self-interview" that the 
following paragraphs are taken : 

"I tramped all through the United States, from California to 
Boston, and up and down, returning to the Pacific Coast by way 
of Canada, where I got into jail and served a term for vagrancy, 
and the whole tramping experience made me become a social- 
ist. In my nineteenth year I returned to Oakland and started 
at the High School, which ran the usual school magazine. This 
publication was a weekly — no, I guess a monthly — one, and I 
wrote stories for it, very little imaginary, just recitals of my sea 
and tramping experiences. I remained there a year, doing 
janitor work as a means of livelihood, and leaving eventually 
because the strain was more than I could bear. After leaving 
the High School, in three months' cramming by myself I took 
the three years' work for that time and entered the University 
of California. I hated to give up the hope of a university edu- 
cation, and worked in a laundry, and with my pen to help me 
keep on. This was the only time I worked because I loved it, 
but the task was too much, and when half way through my 
Freshman year I had to quit. 

"I worked away ironing shirts and other things in the laun- 
dry, and wrote in all my spare time. I tried to keep on at both, 
but often fell asleep with the pen in my hand. Then I left the 
laundry and wrote all the time and lived and dreamed again. 
After three months' trial I gave up writing, having decided 
that I was a failure, and left for the Klondike to prospect for 
gold. At the end of the year, owing to an outbreak of scurvy, I 
was compelled to come out, and on the homeward journey of 
1,900 miles in an open boat, made the only notes of the trip. It 
was in the Klondike I found myself. There nobody talks. 
Everybody thinks. You get your true perspective. I got mine. 

"While I was in the Klondike, my father died, and the bur- 
den of the family fell on my shoulders. Times were bad in 
California and I could get no work. While trying for it I 
wrote 'Down the River,' which was rejected. During the wait 



for this rejection I wrote a twenty thousand word serial for a 
news company, which was also rejected. Pending each rejec- 
tion I still kept on writing fresh stuff. I did not know what an 
editor looked like. I did not know a soul who had ever pub- 
lished anything. Finally a story was accepted by a California 
magazine, for which I received five dollars. Soon afterwards 
The Black Cat offered me forty dollars for a story. Then 
things took a turn, and I shall probably not have to shovel 
coal for a living for some time to come, although I have done 
it and could do it again." 



Advertisers' Guide. 

"The Advertisers' Handy Guide," published by the Morse 
International agency, New York, is a valuable book of reference 
containing in compact shape authentic information concerning 
American newspapers, their circulation and general standing in 
the several fields that they cover. This agency has been in 
business successfully since 1849, which is proof of their stay- 
ing quality. The motto of the agency is "Advertising is Seed 
Sewing," and its address 449 Fourth Avenue, New York. The 
agency maintains a copy department to prepare advertisements 
and illustrations for customers. 



Office Seeker — Is there anything else in the job you 

speak of besides the salary. Political Boss — There's a little 
work on the side. Office Seeker — Ah ! I knew there was some 
string to it! — Chicago News. 



Old Fashioned Individual — Well, little man, building a 

castle? Fin de Siecle Infant — Nope. This is a hotel; there's 
no money in castles. — Harper's Magazine. 



Mrs. Goodsole — Didn't you learn to be a good citizen 

in the reform school? Everett Wrest- — Yes'm. I learned it 
theoretically, but I ain't had no practice. — Houston Post. 



Miss Goodrich — I hear your husband is a great lover 

of the esthetic. Mrs. Newrich — Oh, yes! He takes one every 
time he gets a tooth pulled. — Stanford Chaparral. 



"San Francisco 
Limited " 

— Another fast 
daily train 
to the east 

CHICAGO 

in 69]/^ Hours 

From Ferry Station - - 5:00 P.M. 
From Oakland (1 6th St.) - 5:35 P. M. 
Ar. Chicago, C. & N. W. Ry. 4:30 P.M. 
Ar. Chicago, C. M. & St. P. Ry. 4:30 P. M. 

Standard Pullman and Tourist Sleeping Cars 
Dining Car 

UNION PACIFIC 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

THE EXPOSITION LINE— 191S 



January 17, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



23 




By R. R. l'Hommedieu. 

The action of the California Automobile Association, the 
State motor organization in fighting the new auto tax is some- 
thing that commends itself to every motor car owner. 

The motor car owner does not object to the paying of the tax, 
realizing that it is going towards the upkeep of the road, but 
he does object to being made to bear all the expense while 
owners of horse-drawn vehicles and other users of the high- 
way are not taxed. 

It is well known that the horse-drawn vehicle does as much 
damage to the highways as the fast-moving automobile. 

From the opinions expressed by those who have studied the 
law very closely, there seems to be no question but that the 
judges will declare it void. 

Just recently, Judge Kinkead of Franklin County Court 
of Common Pleas, sitting in Columbus, Ohio, over-ruled a de- 
murrer by the state in an application for an injunction against 
the law and he administered a final knockout blow to that 
proposed law in the state of Ohio, which is ver.y similar to 
that of California. In fact, it is practically the same. This, 
with many other decisions of a like nature already granted by 
judges in other states, makes it feasible to think that the 
California law will also be declared void. 



Northern California Auto Club 

Stimulated by the warm reception the organization of the 
Automobile Club of Northern California has received from the 
hands of the motorists of the State, and especially of that part 
north of Tehachapi, the officials of this organization are hard 
at work perfecting their plans for an active campaign for mem- 
bers and for a number of innovations that will be a distinct 
advantage to every automobile owner and driver in their ter- 
ritory. 

"The Automobile Club of Northern California has several 
distinct purposes and aims," says Secretary Fred M. Franklin, 
"and the widespread interest which the announcement of our 
policy has awakened amongst the automobilists of the State is 
most flattering. 

"Among the many important things which this club will do 
as soon as it has developed enough strength are the following : 
To aid the construction and maintenance of State and county 
highways; to help city, county and State officials in getting 
reasonable traffic regulations enacted, and to see that they are 
enforced after they have become the law of the land ; to protect 
automobilists from unjust discrimination, and through its at- 
torneys to represent any of its members, where such representa- 
tion is needed; and to aid in every way the welfare of the 
motorists and the general public. 

"Along these lines the club has already taken up the propo- 
sition of having the club's card recognized by the different city 
and county police officials. The club will keep a corps of engi- 
neers in the field to report on the conditions of all roads, and 
to keep the motorists of the State informed as to their condi- 
tion. The club expects later on to take up the matter of in- 
surance, so that its members may receive the advantage of 
lower rates and more efficient service. 

"The club will post warning signs near hospitals, schools and 
churches, so that drivers will be able to pass these places with 
mufflers closed and as noiselessly as possible. 

"As soon as definite plans are arranged, a series of 'safety 
first' tests will be made in the streets of San Francisco and 
Oakland, and possibly in streets of other principal cities of 
the State. The idea of this is to educate pedestrians as well 
as motorists, drivers of horse-drawn vehicles, as well as motor- 



men, and show them the necessity of co-operation, so that acci- 
dents may be prevented. 

_ "The service that a club conducted along broad co-operative 
lines can do for its members cannot be stated in limited terms, 
but necessarily must depend upon the spirit and the government 
of the same. The officers of the club are : Lin S. Church, presi- 
dent; Fred G. Wight, first vice-president; Dr. 0. D. Hamlin, 
second vice-president; H. B. Lyon, treasurer; Fred M. Franklin, 
secretary. 

* * * 

Chauffeurs Win Fight 

_ The California Chauffeurs Association has also taken up the 
fight against the chauffeurs license, not so much as the Asso- 
ciation objects to the tax as levied, but it does object to the 
allowing of any one to drive a motor car from a professional 
standpoint who is not thoroughly qualified to act in such a 
capacity. 

The Chauffeurs Association has been trying to raise the 
standard of the professional driver — that is, the driver who 
handles private cars, not the professional driver who races on 
the track or otherwise, but the man who hires out as an engi- 
neer of a mechanical conveyance to private owners. 

Too many men today are driving cars in this capacity who 
are unqualified to act. Time and time again the result in 
their lack of knowledge is shown in accidents, some of which 
result fatally. 

The Chauffeurs Association is trying to bring forcibly to 
the minds of the authorities that in requiring a tax they should 
also require a regular examination to protect the public; not 
only the owner of the cars, but the public who uses the streets 
and highways. 

* * * 

Woman and the Auto 

The Marquise de Castellane, in writing of the American 
woman in Paris, claims that the automobile, as combined with 
the American woman, has changed the habits of society in 
the French capital. Before the American woman used her 
automobile in Paris it was the custom for social duties to em- 
ploy the horse and carriage, but the American woman, as soon 
as she had adopted the automobile, put it in service for every 
use. As soon as American women began to use their automo- 
biles in Paris for visiting purposes the French woman com- 
menced to do the same. 

At first the nobility used the motors to visit their dress- 
makers. Even then a footman rode beside the chauffeur. 
Now even the most conservative of France's select society has 
adopted the American fashion, and the automobile for all sorts 

of social functions is quite the style. 
• • • 

Racing Down South 

The Santa Monica Race Course, over which the Vanderbilt 
Cup and Grand Prize Race will be run February 21st and 23rd, 
respectively, is one of the most famous Road Race Courses in 
the world. The present Road Race record is 78.7 miles per 
hour. There has never been an accident of any consequence 
at Santa Monica. No driver or mechanician has ever been in- 
jured and the Course has no death record whatever. The first 
race was run at Santa Monica July 10, 1909. Since then there 
have been yearly events, and each race has been faster than the 

one before, up to last year. 

» * * 

A. A. A. Contest Committee Chairman 

President John A. Wilson, of the American Automobile As- 
sociation, has announced the appointment of Richard Kenner- 
dell to the chairmanship of the Contest Board to succeed Wil- 
liam Schimpf. Mr. Kennerdell hails from Franklin, Pa., and 
is an enthusiast in contest matters. He once figured as some- 
thing of a cyclist, and has been a pioneer motorist since the 
introduction of the self-propelled vehicle. Chairman Kenner- 
dell is in a position to do considerable traveling, and expects 
to attend the most important race meets in various parts of the 

country. 

» * • 

Will Not Pay Tax 

The United States government will not pay a tax on its auto- 
mobiles when the new state law goes into effect. It is seen 
here that the federal government has also taken a stand against 
the new law. 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 17, 1914. 




News 
Gathered 
Along 
Auto Row 



New 9-50 1914 Mitchell, seven passengers. 



New Mercer* 

The local Mercer distributor takes delight in describing the 
1914 car which arrived last week, guaranteed for a mile in 
fifty-one seconds, speed gained from a motor measuring four 
and one-half by five inches, developing fifty-eight horsepower 
at 1700 revolutions. 

The high power of the motor is, of course, a governing factor 
in the speed and the all-round ability of the models, and most 
of the credit is given by the Mercer engineers to the valves, 
which are not less than two and one-quarter in diameter, with 
a life of 7-16 inch. The valves are of Tungsten steel, which 
admirably resists the highest cylinder temperatures. The cyl- 
inders have T-heads with the intake valves on the right, and are 
cast in pairs with integral jackets, and the bores are finished 
in the modern way — by grinding. Pistons are of the same 
material as the cylinders, and depart from conventional prac- 
tice in that but two rings are fitted, and they are of the concen- 
tric type, joined on the inside to give an even tension at all 
points. The piston pins are clamped in the connecting rods, 
and have their bearings in the piston bosses. 

Pistons and rods are weighed and balanced, so that there will 
be no variation in the weights of the reciprocating parts in a 
motor. The manufacturers claim that much -of the lack of vi- 
bration of the Mercer motor is due to the fact that the connect- 
ing rods are unusually long and that the cylinders are not 
offset. The crankshaft runs in three bronze-backed bearings 
filled with special alloyed bearing babbit. The crankshaft is 
two inches in diameter, the bearings are 3V2, 3 and 4 inches 
long respectively, the short bearing being in the middle, and 
the longest at the flywheel end. A shaft balancing machine is 
employed to get the shafts in perfect running balance at speed 
up to 1,800 revolutions per minute. Camshafts are made with 
integral cams, and though housed in the crankcase, are easily 
removed; the front bearings are annular balls, and the other 
bearings plain. These and many other refinements mark the 
latest models of Mercers as being one of the most desirable 
high grade cars of the day. 



Light Trucks 

"Horse owners to-day find that they are being compelled to 
use motor trucks," says H. D. Knudsen, head of the truck de- 
partment of J. W. Leavitt & Company, agents for the Willys- 
Utility three-quarter ton motor truck. 

"No matter what objections they have in their minds, there 
is nothing else to do. The present situation cannot be handled 
with horses, and it can be handled with machinery. The solu- 
tion of the big transportation problem of to-day, and especially 
the one of short-haul efficiency, is not more teaming. It is not 
a matter of more horses, more hostlers and more wagons. It is 
a matter of invention and engineering; and the answer is now 
for all horse owners of enterprise and foresight. 

"It is the same answer that solved the problems of manufac- 
turing and building and rapid transit. It is the displacing of 
muscle by machinery. When land was $20 an acre, and when 
horses were $50 a piece, there was no urgent need for engines, 
either in the city or on the farm. But to-day we have an en- 
tirely different situation. Land, ordinary farm land, has gone 



up in price until it touches $200 an acre. Horses, ordinary 
horses, without a pedigree, have gone up in price until $1,000 
will only buy three or four of them. 

"Land has gone up in price and partly in quality, through the 
development of scientific agriculture. Horses have gone up in 
price and not in quality. Motor cars, on the other hand, have 
gone up in quality and away down in price. They were never 
so strong and so reasonable in price as they are to-day." 



Tire Care 

"An hour in the garage saves three on the road. An evening 
spent on the tires while the car is in the garage will save many 
dollars during the season, and will save an unpleasant experi- 
ence on the road," says B. H. Pratt, Pacific Coast manager of 
the Fisk Rubber Company. "The first work to be done is the 
permanent repairing of the tubes which have been punctured 
or hastily patched. Slow leaks should also be looked after and 
cured. This is the tube work. On the shoes, the filling of cuts 
and tears and the curing of bruises will be the cases to diag- 
nose and heal. 

"In storing tires for the winter remove them from the car, 
wrap them in strips of thick brown paper, which can be wound 
on a spiral in the manner similar to that in which new tires 
come. Before taking them from the car, wash them thoroughly 
with soap and warm water, being sure that they are dry before 
wrapping them up. Put the tires in a cool, dark place." 





™*| 


$-1 

m 





Officers of the Automobile Club of Northern California in 
conference with District Attorney Charles Fickert of San Fran- 
cisco and District Attorney Fredericks of Los Angeles, regard- 
ing bail for motorists. Left to right — District Attorney Fickert 
of San Francisco, District Attorney Fredericks of Los Angeles, 
Director James H. Schivabacher, Secretary Fred M. Franklin, 
and Publicity Director Burleigh Davison of Automobile Club 
of California, 

—Photo by Spauldlng & Co. 



January 17, 1914. 

Your New Car 

The Perfection Spring Company of 
Cleveland, Ohio, has just issued a very 
interesting and instructive booklet under 
the title "Your New Car." The new book- 
let is quite instructive, and pays one for 
the time taken in reading its pages. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



~^ 




Jnbrcl 



PACIFIC KISSEL-KAR BRANCH 
Van Ness and Golden Gate Aves., San Francisco 



Model- 
Touring Oars 
Runabouts 
Town Cars - 



C. B. Clement Appointed Sales Manager 

The 1914 Mitchell cars which have 
reached the coast have made such an im- 
pression that the Osen-McFarland Auto- 
mobile Company, distributers for the ter- 
ritory, have decided, in view of the fact 
that the factory promises early and larger 
deliveries, to inaugurate a vigorous selling campaign. 

With this object in view, O. C. McFarland, of the Company, 
has announced the appointment of C. B. Clement as sales mana- 
ger. Clement is not unknown to the automobile industry, and 
especially in the gas engine world for over ten years he was 
connected with the largest gas engine builders on the coast, 
graduating from the heavier type into the automobile industry 
when the latter perfected the gas engine of former days. Re- 
cently he has been identified with the automobile trade in the 
Northwest. 

For the last three years he has been connected principally 
with the Mitchell-Staver Company of Portland, the agents for 
the Mitchell cars in that territory. This experience has made 
him perfectly familiar with the selling qualities of the Mitchell 
cars, and his new connection is merely following out a more 
advanced line of operation than he inaugurated in the North- 
west. He left this week to make a swing around the territory 
governed and handled by the Osen-McFarland Company. He 
will visit all the agents to thoroughly familiarize himself with 
local conditions before returning home and laying out his cam- 
paign of operation. 



We Sell on Easy Terms 

Standard Models 
Prices F. O. B. Factory. 



Price 

♦550 

- 5110 

750 



AMERICAN 



American Motors California Co. 

476-482 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco 

I', ii. i(. Factor; 
Models 

122 I Cylind 

642 G Cylinder. 2 Passenger 

644 r> Cylinder, I Pas en - c 

646 6Cj Mini, ,-, i'. Passenger 



i P. 

60 II. P. 
60 II. P. 



2760 

2950 



Prize at Show 

Some one or other will win $1,000 at the fifth annual auto- 
mobile show to be held in Portland beginning January 27th. 
This much was decided at a special meeting of the Portland 
Trade Automobile Association's executive committee held last 
week in the report just received by Henry D. McCoy, of Chans- 
lor & Lyon Company from the Portland branch. 

The tickets of admission will be numbered, and a duplicate 
tab torn off will be placed in a large bag and the contents care- 
fully kept until the last night, when a public drawing, probably 
by some child or other, will be given a check for $1,000 to be 
put towards the price of any car he may like to choose from 
off the floor. That is absolutely the only condition imposed 
upon the winner, that it must go towards the purchase of an 
automobile from one of the makes exhibited. Numerous other 
attractive features already have been planned and are well 
under way. _ Prominent among these is the decoration scheme. 
The main lines along which they are working is to make the 
hall have the appearance of out-of-doors. This will be done 
by working in some of the best-known scenic highways in 
the locality. 



If you want to prolong the life 
of your engine. 

If you want to eliminate smoke 
and carbon, 
a /[ rr\ |—v ¥ If you want to reduce your oil 

MoToRoL — 

Uae MoToRoL 
''It suits because It doesn't soot" 

Hughson & Merton, Inc. 

S30 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 


There is nothing in Goodrich Advertising 
that isn't in Goodrich Goods 

Goodrich SSL Tires 

Best in the Long Run 

There are forty-three years of experience in 
rubber manufacturing in every Goodrich Tire 

THE B. F. GOODRICH COMPANY 

Everything that's best in Rubber 
341-347 Market Street San Francisco 

Los Angeles Oakland Fresno Sacramento 


LIGHT YOUR AUTOMOBILE WITH THE 

DYNETO Automatic Electric Lighting System 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 
Pscific Com Atenti 
630 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 
CALL AND SIE DEMONSTRATION 


AUTO FENDER & RADIATOR WORKS 

Make and Repair 

Fenders, Radiators, Hoods, Metal Bodies, Tanks, 

Dash Shields, Lamps, Mud Pans, Tool 

Boxes. Metal Spinning, Etc. 

466 Golden Gate Ave. 32-34 Van Ness Ave. 

Phone Franklin 6460 Phone Market 6409 


Full factory equipment on sll Pick- 

"ur\r\unD" ards, Oldstnobtles, Coles, Thotnss and 

HUUVtK Seven others. Absolutely perfect. 

Full set of four — $14 to StS. Under 

A I IV 11 IARY SPRINPi Sr compression by heavy loads, rough 

AUAILIAKI arrcilNtj « roldi „, bumps Under all conditions 

rides as easy as on asphalt. Impos- 
SHOCK ABSORBER slbla to break springs. No competition 

HOOVER SPRING CO. 
6it Turk St.. San Francisco 


PEART & ELKINGTON 

VULCANIZING «»~««^«™ 

42 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 


Machinists and Engineers 

k'PPNIAM RRf^iQ Automobile Repairing a Specialty 
IXEElNAlN DrVUO. J50 Goldan Gate Avanua. bat. Hyda 

and Lai kin Streets 
Khooii: Franklin etai. Hant J satt 


FREE FROM CARBON 
PANHARD L. H. A B. I. BILL 
fN T T 543 Golden Gate Ave. 
^-^ ■*• -*— ' San Francisco. Cal. 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 17, 1914. 



Service To-day 

"The word service., as applied to the automobile industry, 
has assumed a different meaning within the last two years," 
says Charles S. Howard, the head of the Howard Automobile 
Company, distributors for the Buick cars on the Pacific Coast. 

"Service as applied to automobiles originally meant the mak- 
ing good of deficiency that cropped up in the manufacturing of 
motor cars. That day has passed, and now there is no necessity 
for that kind of service, as is to be seen in the Buick cars of 
the last two or three years. The word service to-day means 
even more than it ever did, inasmuch that it means the con- 
tinuous use of the motor vehicle by the owner. Every piece of 
machinery that is used will wear, even with the best handling; 
parts that have to undergo the strain of operation, and especi- 
ally the great strain and travel given to motor cars wear in ac- 
cordance with the distance traveled. Therefore a service to- 
day means service stations in which are employed experts 
thoroughly familiar with every working part of a car. Especi- 
ally those cars which the people for whom they are working 
represent. 

"This is the case with the Buick car. Those who purchase 
Buick cars can feel certain that wherever they go throughout 
the United States, they will be certain to find within easy reach 
some service station, branch, house or dealer that is equipped 
with a plant that will give service to the fullest of its meaning. 
A good example of this may be seen in considering the Lincoln 
Highway, that boulevard to be from the Atlantic to the Pacific 
Coast. This within the next year will become the highway 
for the rest of the United States to the gates of the big Fair 
to be held in San Francisco. All roads will lead to this main 
highway, and it will be across it that the motorists of the 
United States will travel. 

"Between New York and San Francisco are located eighteen 
Buick service stations. That is, service stations over which 
the factory itself has control. But that does not mean all, for 
between New York and San Francisco their eighty-seven deal- 
ers are directly located on the Lincoln Highway, besides seven 
branch houses. This means eighty-seven dealers and seven 
branch houses, not figuring on the terminals where we have 
the coast covered from the Northwest to the Mexican border — 
there would be ninety-four places where Buick service is to be 
had between New York and San Francisco, all averaging about 
one place for every thirty-three miles where one can find a 
Buick representative. While they are not as evenly distributed 
as these figures would indicate, yet at all times there is within 
easy reach of a Buick owner in traveling over the Lincoln High- 
way a station, either a branch of the factory or a dealer who is 
fully equipped to give him a service that is as up to date as 
the word with its new meaning is understood at the present 
time." 



Jeffery AU-Weather Car 

One of the most striking cars at the New York show, and one 
that attracted a great deal of attention was the Jeffery all- 
weather car. This is a new model just built by the well known 
factory at Kenosha. The general manager, J. I. McMullen, of 
the Jeffery Auto Sales Company, coast distributers for the Jef- 
fery cars, has received word that this new model will be es- 
pecially adaptable to California climatic conditions. McMullen 
in speaking of the Jeffery all-weather car, says: 

"It is something new and a handy get-about car of the en- 
closed type; the body is of aluminum, finished in hand-buffed, 
dull black pebble-grain leather, or in rich cloth upholstery. It 
is the car for the busy man or woman who values light weight, 
snappy appearance, speed and comfort. 

"The top folds quickly and easily, and you have a roadster 
of exclusive appearance. The equipment is complete. The ad- 
vance orders for this new type indicate that it will dominate the 
field of small enclosed cars. 

"Jeffery all-weather car has light weight and light running 
qualities without sacrificing comfort. The equipment includes 
pressure feed gasoline tank with gauge and the dash, illumi- 
nated with a dash electric light, is replete with Stewart-Warner 
speedometer and ammeter, gasoline and oil pressure gauges, 
light switch, coil switch, a button for the electric horn and two 
compartments for valuables. Back of the seat is a large 
compartment for carrying extra clothing. It is carried on the 
regular new four-cylinder chassis." 



arse*/*/*// " 

°? -rft tlipt.j'Jo Q<jsJ<)<rf CcrJPljf/Y ,js jujt rH£ 
<W(f ygrJ y/ljllT. 

— v^tf— 

9 I. on f)si( 



Phone Sutter 300 



Pacific Sightseeing Co., Prop. 



FOURTH ST. GARAGE 



FOURTH & HARRISON STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Commercial Trucks 
A Specialty 



Automobile 
Supplies 



The attention of owners of pleasure cars living In San Mateo 
County Is called to the convenience of this Garage to Third 
and Townsend Street Depot. 

THE LARGEST GROUND FLOOR FIREPROOF GARAGE WEST OF CHICAGO 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

Call on us when you want photographs of any kind. 
We can and will please you. Our new studio, the 
largest west of New York, covers 9,000 equare feet of 
floor space, and Is completely equipped for every branch 
of our business. You are cordially Invited to call and 
we will be very glad to take you through the different 
departments, portrait, commercial, copying, enlarging, 
Kodak, etc. You will be interested. 

ARTHUR SPAULDING CO., 
Everything in Modern Photography. 

625-633 Eddy St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Phones— Franklin 1184. Home C 4084. 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS* BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft and Transportation 

While anywhere in United Statea, Canada and Europe 



/€TNA INSURANCE CO. 



OF HARTFORD 
PACIFIC BRANCH— 325 California Street, 



San Francisco 



Tips to Automobilists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 
The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide: 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
SAN JOSE.— Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlors for ladles In connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE.— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North J-irst street. The best French 
dinner In California. 76 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 



PALO ALTO.— PALO ALTO GARAGE, 443 Emmerson St. Tel., P. A. 
33S. Auto livery at all hours. Tires and sundries In stock. Gasoline, oil, 
repairing, lathework, vulcanizing. Open day and night. 



January 17, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



27 



THE NEW CURRENCY LAW 

Cordial Acceptance by the Banking Community— Features of the Law Explained in De- 
tail— Establishment of a National Central Bank With Eight Regional Branches 



In brief, the new currency law established a great national 
central bank, divided and sectionalized by the creation of 
eight regional reserve banks. That is to say, it is a central 
bank split up into eight or more branches as may become neces- 
sary, but subject to one general financial policy. The design 
of the act is to accomplish three great reforms which are sum- 
marized as follows: 

"1. A true and elastic national currency, based, not upon gov- 
ernment fiat or government debt, but upon the commercial re- 
sources of 100,000,000 people. This currency is definitely es- 
tablished on the gold standard. 

"2. The complete separation of the organized banking system 
of the country from the New York Stock Exchange and Wall 
street gambling. 

"3. The destruction of the centralized control of money and 
credit— the so-called Money Trust — and the extinction of a 
centralized bank, both in principle and practice." 

Meets General Approval. 

While the bill had many critics during the debate over its 
enactment, now that it has become law it is cordially accepted 
in the highest and most enlightened circles of finance. For ex- 
ample, Paul M. Warburg, of the great banking house of Kuhn, 
Loeb & Co., of New York, is quoted as saying in explanation of 
the law : 

"There cannot be any doubt that the enactment of this legis- 
lation will inaugurate a new era in the history of banking in the 
United States. While it is to be regretted that some import- 
ant suggestions made by the business community could not be 
adopted, the fundamental thoughts, for the victory of which 
some of us have worked for so many years, have won out. That 
is to say, from now on we shall witness the gradual elimination 
of the bond-secured currency, of scattered reserves, of immo- 
bilized commercial paper, and of pyramiding of call loans on 
the Stock Exchange. The ship is headed right, and nothing 
will ever turn her back into her old course. This is a success 
of such vast importance that, no matter whether the law be 
perfect in many details, we have all reasons to be profoundly 
grateful for having progressed so far." 

A Cordial Acceptance. 

Similar testimony to the merits of the bill is given by other 
financial authorities of note, and in fact the hostile criticism 
has almost completely ceased. It is true that the present cordial 
acceptance of the law is due in considerable measure to the fact 
pointed out by the New York times that the bill was altered 
"in a multitude of ways, and immensely for the better" in its 
passage of the two houses and in conference. The Philadelphia 
Public Ledger says of the law that "it puts the United States 
abreast of other enlightened nations of the globe in having 
one centralized federated bank, since the regional reserve insti- 
tutions are merely to be so many fingers of one hand, and it 
sounds the death knell of such financial panics as that of 1907." 
Similar testimony to the merits of the bill is borne by the press 
of most of the financial centers. 

Details of the Law. 

The New York Sun, which remarks that the law and its bank- 
ing plan will be "conducive to prosperity," thus summarizes 
its salient features in detail : 

"Authorizes at least eight regional reserve associations, each 
with a regional bank. Will probably be twelve. 

"Constitutes the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of 
Agriculture and the Controller of Currency the organization 
commission to fix boundaries of districts and reserve cities. 

"Entire system under the control of the Federal reserve 
board of seven members, the Secretary of the Treasury and the 
Controller of Currency, ex-officio, and five others appointed by 
the President. 



_ "National banks must signify their intention to join the asso- 
ciation within sixty days, or they cannot act as reserve agents 
thereafter. 

"They must enter within a year or forfeit their charters. 

"State banks may join by meeting requirements for Federal 
inspection. 

"Total capital stock of the regional reserve association, $106,- 
000,000, or 6 per cent of capital and surplus of all national 
banks. 

"Stock open to the national banks first and then to the public. 

"Dividends on the regional bank stock, 6 per cent. 
_ "Provides after two years for the gradual retirement of na- 
tional bank-notes and refunding of 2 per cent government 
bonds. Substitution of 3 per cent gold without circulation 
privileges, to run twenty years, or 3 per cent. Treasury gold 
notes for one year, renewable annually for thirty years. 

"Authorizes the government through the Federal reserve 
banks to issue notes against collateral approved by the Federal 
reserve board redeemable at the treasury in gold and at regional 
banks in gold or lawful money at election of banks. 

"Requires gold reserves of 40 per cent in the Treasury De- 
partment against outstanding reserve notes. Provides tax 
against depletion. 

"Every regional reserve bank managed by nine directors, 
three chosen by the Federal reserve board, six elected by mem- 
ber banks, but three of whom shall not be bankers." 

A Centralized Policy. 

The Federal reserve board of seven members sitting in Wash- 
ington settles the general financial policy of the regional sub- 
sidiary organization. As Senator Robert Owen, chairman of 
the Senate banking and currency committee, explains : "It con- 
centrates the reserves of 25,000 banks and provides the means 
of making them quickly available. It will stabilize commerce 
and industry in the United States, and give to business men who 
are honest and capable facilities which they have not enjoyed 
before." The essential features of the law are the concentra- 
tion of bank reserves, the mobilization of bank reserves, the 
establishment of an open discount market, the establishment of 
an elastic currency in the form of Federal reserve notes secured 
by commercial bills, and the establishment of foreign branches 
to handle the foreign business of the United States. 

The President's Promises. 

When the President signed the bill, he said: 
"It is the first of a series of constructive measures by which 
the Democratic party will show that it knows how to serve the 
country. In calling it the first of a series of constructive meas- 
ures, I need not say that I am not casting any reflections on the 
great tariff bill which preceded it. The tariff bill was meant to 
remove those impediments to American industry and prosperity 
which had so long stood in their way. It was a great piece of 
preparation for the achievements of American commerce and 
American industry which are certainly to follow. Then there 
came on the heels of it this bill, which furnishes the machinery 
for free and elastic and uncontrolled credits, put at the disposal 
of the merchants and manufacturers of this country for the first 
time in fifty years." 

Rare Notes of Criticism. 

It is a remarkable consensus of editorial, political and finan- 
cial opinion to which attention is here drawn. An occasional 
note of criticism is heard, but it is mostly vague and deficient 
in specifications. For instance, Representative Hayes, of this 
State, still maintains that the principle of the law is unsound, 
and that its effects "will plague the Democrats for years to 
come." The Wall Street Journal declares that "it is a grave ex- 
periment, and it is probably impossible for the most expert 
bankers to foretell exactly how the measure will work." 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 17, 1914. 



THE MAKING OF AN EXPOSITION 

Panama-Pacific International Exposition Revealed by Its Present Progress-Immensity and Grandeur of Huge 
Exhibit Palaces Shown by Colossal Frames of Buildings-Wonderful Flower Gardens on Grounds- 
Exquisite Beauty of Architecture 



INTERNATIONAL 

San fRANcisf: 






The immensity and grandeur of the Panama-Pacific Inter- 
national Exposition as it will appear on its opening day, Feb- 
ruary 20th of next year, is apparent to every visitor to the site 
in San Francisco. The Exposition has taken shape; it has 
passed the preliminary stage, and has developed into a form 
which is appreciated by the thousands of spectators who throng 
the grounds on every Sunday and on holidays. 

All of the great main exhibit palaces are in process of con- 
struction, and several have been completed. Of these, the first 
to stand ready for its exhibits is the Palace of Machinery, the 
largest wooden building ever erected, and to be noted in history 
as the building in which the first indoor aeroplane flight was 
ever held. This was when Lincoln Beachey, on December 30, 



Triumphal arch on the 
east side of the grand court 
of honor, the Court of the 
Sun and Stars, at the Pan- 
ama-Pacific International 
Exposition, San Francisco, 
1915. The Court of Sun 
and Stars in size will cor- 
respond to the place before 
the Cathedral of St. Peter's 
at Rome. This triumphal 
arch, larger than the Arc 
de Triomphe at Paris, will 
lead into the great east or 
Festive Court. The size of 
the arch may be judged by 
the fact that the height of 
the archway will be ninety 
feet. The columns of the 
colonnade encircling the 
court will be sixty feet in 
height; the group sur- 
mounting the arch is com- 
posed of figures symbolical 
of the Orient — elephants, 
Arab warriors and camels 
— the tallest figure being 
twenty-eight feet in height. 
On the opposite side of the 
Court of Sun and Stars will 
be a triumphal arch of 
equal size, surmounted by 
prairie schooners and other 
figures typifying the Occi- 
dent. The arch upon the 
east and the arch upon the 
west will exemplify the 
theme of the Exposition, 
the meeting of the East and 
West in the Panama Canal. 



1913, flew the length of the giant structure in a seventy-five 
feet wide center aisle between the massive columns. 

With frames in place, and outer structures completed or 
nearly completed on all of the buildings, the exquisite beauty 
of the architecture is no longer the subject of conjecture, but 
can be accurately gauged and judged. 

The Largest Wooden Building. 

The Palace of Machinery is 368 feet wide and 968 feet long. 
The structure consists of three main longitudinal aisles, with 
a secondary aisle at either side. These run the entire length 
of the building, and present the appearance of five great barrel 
vaults intercepted by walls of massive columns. The ceiling is 



January 17, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



29 



comprised of gigantic trusses which are connected so that stand- 
ing at one end of the building, and looking toward the other, 
they seem to form a continuous arched ceiling. 

The Palace of Education, in which will be housed every 
exhibit pertaining to teaching and schools, in which classes of 
children will actually recite and be heard by expert teachers 
for the benefit of the visiting instructors, is at present eighty- 
five per cent completed, and will be finished within the month, 
January, 1914. 

This palace is one of the main group of eight exhibit pal- 
aces, which present the appearance, in a way, of being under 
the same roof, for although separated by beautiful courts, 
they form a single architectural theme. While the floor space 
of each varies, the general dimensions of height and domes 
and like architectural features are the same. 

Each is 96 feet in height to the ridge, 87 feet to the soffit 
of the three-hinged arches, 79 feet to the eaves or cornices, 110 
feet to the spring line of domes, and 160 feet to the tops of 




Main entrance to the Fair ground. 

the domes, and in each instance the diameter of the domes is 
100 feet. The shapes of the buildings vary, however, and their 
areas, correspondingly. 

The other palaces of the group are completed to the follow- 
ing degrees: Food Products, 70 per cent; Agriculture, 60 per 
cent; Liberal Arts, 50 per cent; Manufactures, 50 per cent; 
Varied Industries, 55 per cent; Mines and Metallurgy, 55 per 
cent; Transportation, 40 per cent. 

In scanning these figures, it must be remembered that con- 
struction was only started on these a few months ago, and that 
there still remains one year before the Exposition gates will 
formally open. 

Open on Time. 

The work has progressed with unprecedented rapidity. This 
will be the first exposition that was ever perfect in every detail 
on the date of opening. That is a point upon which the Pan- 
ama-Pacific directors have been most insistent. There is no 
question but that when the exposition is formally opened on 
February 20, 1915, there will be in the ensemble no uncom- 
pleted work to mar the beauty of the finished spectacle. 

The construction of an exposition of the immense size and 



indescribable grandeur of this one is a task that to the layman 
is inconceivable, and even to engineers presents so many baf- 
fling problems that the greatest experts in each line were neces- 
sarily employed upon the work. 

The site itself was far from beautiful. A half-sunken basin 
or salt swamp, it presented an appearance of hopelessness to 
the onlooker. 

Making a Garden. 

The only question was, could it be made level and above 
water, and practical for the uses to which it would be put. Mil- 
lions of yards of sand were pumped from the bay, and the sur- 
face of the site lifted high above the reach of the waves. A 
vast quantity of rich loam and soil was then transported from 
the Sacramento River to the site, seventy miles away, by 
barges, and laid to a depth of six to eight inches over the 
ground. 

Horticulturists of note in every part of the world were com- 
municated with by cable, and immediately rare flowers peculiar 
to each country were sent by the hundreds of thousands to San 
Francisco, where they are carefully planted in specially made 
nurseries and lath-houses, later to be transplanted to the Ex- 
position grounds. Rare trees, some of them hundreds of years 
old, were brought from their native heaths .in Africa, Austra- 
lia, India, Central and South America and the Philippine 
Islands, and then transported to the Exposition grounds, treated 
by a special process by the exposition experts. Then they 
were re-planted, and now are growing as if they had germinated 
and sprouted in San Francisco. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



(Advertisement) 



Dr. Agnew, rectal diseases. Pacific Building. 4th and Market streets. 



TAKE a 
TRIP 
TO and 
THROUGH the 

PANAMA CANAL 

THIS WINTER 



2 CRUISES 
February 28 March 17, 1914 

$125 and up 

Per S. S. "KRONPRINZESSIN CEC1LIE" 

Secure Rooms NOW 



OTHER PLEASURE CRUISES 

5 Panama Canal -- West Indies from New York. 
S. S. "Cleveland" 93 days Orient— India Cruise. 
S. S. "Cleveland" 135 days Around-the-World Cruise. 



Handsomely Illustrated Pamplets Sent on Application 

Hamburg-American Line 

160 Powell Street San Francisco 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER 



37-45 First Street Phone Sutter 223C 

Private Exchange Connecting All Departments 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 17, 1914. 



MM 




The New Poodle Dog 




HOTEL 

and 

RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: Franklin 2960 




MAISON DOREE 

HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

151-157 Ellis Street 47 Glasgow Street 

Phone Douglas 1010 

TRY OUR SPECIAL 

50c 4-COURSE QUICK LUNCHEON 

With Claret, or Glass of Beer, Tea or Coffee 

From 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. 

OUR J1.00 DINNERS ARE, POSITIVELY 
THE BEST IN TOWN 



BLANCO'S 



O'Farrell and Larkln 
Streets 



Phone Franklin t 

No visitor should leave the city without seeing the 
finest cafe in America 



Sutter 1672 
Home C 3970 
Home C 4781. Hotel 



Cyril Arnanton 
Henry Rlttman 
C. Lahedeme 



NEW DELMONICO'S 

(FORMERLY MAISON TORTONI) 
RESTAURANT AND HOTEL NOW OPEN 

Best French Dinner In the City with Wine, Ji.oo. Banquet Hells end Private 

Dining Rooms. Music Every Evening. 
862 Qeary Street San Francisco 



J. Bergez 



C. Mailhebueu 



L. Couteit 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old POODLE DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT EVERY EVENING 
415*421 Bueh St.. Sao Fnodico (Above Keirmy) EichaDie, Douglei 2411 



MR. PROPERTY OWNER 

Have you not always some slight repairs? Stopped 
basins, broken window cords, electrical repair work? 
We will assume all your repairs at a small monthly 
rate. Our representative will call at your request 

Phoenix Repair Company 

Nevada Bank Bldg., 14 Montgomery St. Phone Douglas 822 




A serious condition confronts the British Colonial office, aris- 
ing out of the labor situation in South Africa, and the impor- 
tation of Hindu coolies. It is practically the same problem 
that confronts the Pacific Coast of America and the Australian 
and New Zealand commonwealths. All these countries, as well 
as South Africa, are threatened with invasion on a large scale 
by Asiatic labor. In South Africa, however, the problem is 
complicated by the fact that the Hindus are British subjects 
seeking admission to a British colony. The South African Par- 
liament enacted severe exclusive tests, borrowed from the 
statutes of Australia and Canada. All this makes a very em- 
barrassing situation, from the imperial point of view, for the 
home government, as the Glasgow Herald points out: 

"It is an extremely perplexing question which has thus been 
raised. The tendencies of Dominion legislation directed 
against Oriental invasion seem to involve the creation of grave 
Imperial problems in the settlement of local difficulties; seem, 
moreover, to be rather indifferent to the larger danger. A 
writer who knows the Union and its politics very well says : 
'The average South African is not prepared to admit the es- 
sentially Imperial aspect of the whole Asiatic problem. He is 
apt to remark hotly that this is a South African question, and he 
is in no way concerned with the Imperial side of it. That at- 
titude is a possible and comprehensible one, and it exists else- 
where in the Empire besides South Africa. But wherever it 
crops up throughout the Empire, it is desirable to realize clearly 
that it is only compatible with complete national independence. 
It is impossible to reconcile it with any great and growing cor- 
porate life of the Empire as a whole, the essence of which im- 
plies the subordination of the lesser to the greater interests.' " 

This is the British view, but there is not the smallest likeli- 
hood that it will be accepted by the self-governing colonies of 

South Africa, Canada and Australia. 

» * » 

Vaudeville Morals. 

An entertaining controversy is published on the morals of the 
music halls and vaudeville in London, between the Bishop of 
Kensington and Mr. George Bernard Shaw. Mr. Shaw, who is 
the determined enemy of every form of censorship, writes: 

"There is no censensus of opinion as to what is objectionable 
and what is desirable in theatrical entertainments. Mr. Butt's 
audiences are as big as the Bishop's congregations, and they pay 
him more than they pay the Bishop. If the Bishop may say to 
these people, 'You shall not go to the Palace Theatre, or, if you 
go you shall not see what you like there, because I do not con- 
sider it good for you,' then these people may say to the Bishop, 
'You shall not preach the doctrine of the Atonement; for in our 
opinion it destroys all sense of moral responsibility.' 

"I need not again elaborate the point; but I will point out 
something that the Bishop may not have thought of in this con- 
nection. Not only is art, or religion, a power for evil as well 
as for good; but the self-same exhibition or sermon- that effects 
one man's salvation may effect another man's damnation. The 
placing of the Bible in the hands of the laity by the Protestant 
Catholics produced good results; but it also produced all the 
horrors that were predicted by the Roman Catholics as their 
reason for withholding it, from an epidemic of witch-burning 
to the political excesses of the Anabaptists and Puritans, and 
the sour misery of 16th century Scotland. 
"The case against the freedom of the Palace Theatre is as dust 
in the balance compared with the case against the freedom of 
the Bible Society. Is the Bishop, having attacked the Palace 
Theatre, going to attack the Bible Society a fortiori? Of course 
not, because he can see the overwhelming argument in favor of 
scriptural freedom which he is unable to see in the case of the 
theatre, because the theatre is the Church's most formidable 
rival in forming the minds and guiding the souls of the people." 

• • * 

Chain Stores. 

The commercial institution which in this country we call the 
"chain store," in England is known as the "multiple shop," and 



January 17, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



in that country it has already had a far more extensive develop- 
ment than in the United States. The Daily Mail Year Book 
gives these particulars: 

"By 'multiple' shop," he says, "is meant the retail branches 
of a large private concern or limited liability company fur- 
nished with all its stock from a central source, the local 
manager being solely concerned only in the selling, and hav- 
ing no voice in the buying of the goods he handles. These 
branch establishments have come into being during the last 
quarter of a century, and their growth is an amazing one, not 
only in point of number, but also in the profits made by this 
new commercialism. Certain trades have been affected enor- 
mously, others have as yet escaped. Trades which aim at sup- 
plying the elementary wants of a community — food, drink, and 
clothes — have been exploited successfully." 

"Passing from food to clothing, it is not surprising to discover 
that the multiple shop is slowly absorbing the bulk of the trade 
in certain directions. Take, for example, boots and shoes. The 
number of firms make and supply footwear direct is very con- 
siderable, and those who, though not manufacturers, yet con- 
duct large businesses through multiple shops, is -still greater. 
One firm, which refused particulars, is said by one of its Lon- 
don managers to have 460 shops in the United Kingdom. Here 
are two or three well known firms, Messrs. Lilley and Skinner, 
Ltd., operate only in London, but they own 76 shops and em- 
ploy a capital of 260,000 pounds sterling. The 'Saxone' firm 
possess 50 shops, and Messrs. Manfield own 68 branches in 
the United Kingdom and on the Continent. In London they 
'run' 14 shops, and in Paris 13. Nothing illustrates the triumph 
of British footwear more than that single fact. The factories of 
this firm are among the most up-to-date in the whole world." 



A LAWLESS STREAM. 



Unbridled License of the I. W. W. on the Streets of the City. 

Editor News Letter — For too many days our city has been 
flooded with a turbid stream of the so-called "unemployed." It 
has ebbed and flowed its dirty course up and down our streets, 
gurgling what, in any other city would have been echoless men- 
aces. But in this city of big expanses and rich opportunities, 
where to each man it is possible to be a kingdom unto himself, 
the growl is heard, and even worse — heeded. Those in high 
places bend their heads and parley with the scum. 

What does it mean when the authoritative men of San Fran- 
cisco allow 3,000 unskilled tramps to insolently demand labor 
at skilled wages. Not supplicate, beg or even ask, but demand. 

They do not want work; they want noise, riot and big talk. 
Those who want work do not talk about it. They go and get it. 
There is work for all who want it, and yet more work. A few 
were sent to work on the City Hall, and the exhibition there was 
one to disgust any decent individual. Jokes and jeers batted 
from one "bum" to another. 

"Watch me hit this stone," cried one, tapping a brick as gen- 
tly as if it were cut glass. "Easy money." "San Francisco is 
the place for me," and many more remarks of similar nature. 

And the self-respecting men of San Francisco stand for this? 
Ridiculed and sneered at. A fruitless job this — trying to help 
those who won't help themselves. 

The other day at Ninth and Howard streets, one man vali- 
antly declared that "they" were demanding eight hours' work 
and $3 a day, and "they" would take no less. "They" had 
rendered their ultimatum, and to-day "they" waited "their" de- 
cision. If it was unfavorable, "they" knew what "they" would 
do. For what could any one do to them? The police wouldn't 
touch them. The city officials wouldn't touch them. The mili- 
tia wouldn't touch them. The soldiers in the Presidio wouldn't 
touch them. No matter what "they" did, "they" were safe. 
The capitalist lived by the work of their hands alone, and 
"they" would put them off the map. And so on. and so forth. 

Every word a stab at all the ideals of national and municipal 
patriotism. Cursing order, justice, law, the flag and the coun- 
try. The same old ineffectual cry of the unfit. Blaming per- 
sonal conditions for their own mental, moral and physical dis- 
abilities. 

No other country in the civilized world would tolerate the 
blasphemous language against their flag and their government 
as America does. We boast of our freedom. Well, freedom 
should be exercised against such a class as the one in question. 
They should be freed of the country they profess to despise. 



San Francico should be great. Standing as it does a portal 
from the east to the far-east, it is overflowing with marvelous 
natural advantages. If only its men would stand together and 
sponge from off its face the dirt that feeds no seed and bears 
no fruit. 



Wedding Presents.— The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. ,Ad,. rt i,.„,. n „ 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



SNELL SEMINARY 

Has Moved to 

2237 PIEDMONT AVE., BERKELEY 

Boarding and day School. 
Founded 1874. From pri- 
mary to college entrance, 

ADELAIDE SMITH 

PRINCIPAL 



Hitchcock Military Academy 

SAN RAFAEL, CAL. 

THE ONLY SCHOOL IN THE WEST HAVING 
SEPARATE ROOMS FOR EACH BOY 

Accredited; Large Campus Gymnasium, Indoor 
Rifle Range.Cadets may enter any time of the 
year. Summer camp on Eel River, June to 
August. 

Principals 
REX W. SHERER S. J. HALLEY 



Miss Harker's School PA ^ F0 A ^° 



Boarding and Day School (or Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mills. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nurse 
for younger children. Ninth year. 

Catalogue upon application. 



A. W. Be#t 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1623 California Street 



Life Cla 

Day and Nlffht 



Illustrating' 
Sketching 

Palntin* 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
.Market street, near Octavia. Telephone Park 2940. 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgeon of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.: 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy St., now at room 403 
Westbaak Building, corner Ellis and Market. 

ATTORNEYS- AT- LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge. Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building. San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dr. R. T. Leaner, Surgeon Chiropodist, formerly of 6 Geary street: 
removes corns entirely whole — painless — without knife. Bunions and in- 
g nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 212-214 West- 
l ink B'.dg.. 830 Market SL Tel. Kearny 3678. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public and Pension Attorney. All legal 
papers drawn up accurately. 217 Montgomery SL. above Bueh, San Fran- 
cisco. Cal. Phone Douglas (01. 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 17, 1914. 




Footpad — Your money or your life! 

' You've got only 50 cents. — Chicago 



Mrs. Tightly — That's 



reasonable enough, Jake! 
News. 

"The darn fools!" "Who?" "The Speedleys." "Why?" 

"They've mortgaged their automobile to buy a home." — New- 
ark News. 

Maiden — What's this 'trough of the sea' we read about ? 

Corney — Oh, I guess that is what the ocean greyhounds drink 
out of. — Tit-Bits. 

"Did you ever realize anything on that investment?" 

"Oh, yes." "What did you realize on it?" "What a fool I had 
been." — Baltimore American. 

"Let me introduce you to the most honest young man I 

have ever known." "But mamma doesn't want me to meet any 
poor young men." — Houston Post. 

"Did you come back on an all-steel train?" "When the 

waiters and porters finished plucking me, I felt sure that it 
was." — Birmingham Age Herald. 

Dentist's Wife — Why do you open the door of the pa- 
tient's room when I sing? Dentist — Want to let the waiters 
know it isn't the patients." — Columbia Jester. 

"It must be great to be a man. One dress suit lasts you 

for years and years, and a woman must have a new gown for 
every party." "That's why one dress suit lasts a man for years 
and years." — Judge. 

Barefaced Junior — Yes, I'm trying to raise a mustache, 

and I'm wondering what color it will be when it comes out. 
Miss Green — Gray, I should say, at the rate it appears to be 
growing. — Yale Record. 

"You don't seem to be as fond of Charley Dawkins as 

you used to be." "No; I admit that I don't care for him at all 
any more. Sometimes it seems as if I just couldn't wait until 
after Christmas to tell him so." — Judge. 

"What I want to see," said the reformer, "is a city that 

knows absolutely nothing of graft." "That's what I'd like to 
see," replied the ward politician. "Wouldn't it be a gold-mine 
tor the right parties?" — Washington Star. 

"That man who paid a fortune for a bogus rare book 

must be a very indignant bibliophile." "Well," replied Miss 
Cayenne, "there are bibliophiles; and then there are what Josh 
Billings would have called "bibliaphools." — Washington Star. 

Seedy Individual (who has come up just after the rescue) 

— Are you the cove wot 'as just pulled my boy aht o' the sea! 
The Hero (modestly, after effecting a gallant rescue) — Yes, my 
friend, but that's quite all right — don't say anything more about 
it. "Orl right? It ain't arl right. Wot abaht 'is bloomin' 'at?" 
— London Opinion. 

Cecil. Rhodes used to take a coop of hens on board to 

provide fresh eggs on his numerous voyages between England 
and South Africa. But those were three weeks' journeys, and 
not a mere five-day crossing of the Atlantic. Hence another 
prominent South African personage was asked why he did not 
follow Rhodes' example and provide himself with the luxury 
of new laid eggs at sea. "Oh, I don't bother to take a coop 
of fowls on board," he replied. "But I tip the bos'un who 
looks after Rhodes' hens, and I get Rhodes' eggs." — London 
Chronicle. 



Telephone Kearny I461 Private Exchange Connecting All Warehouses 

SAN FRANCISCO WAREHOUSE CO. 

Warehousemen Forwarding Agents Distributors Public Weighers 

Spur Track Connections With All Railroads 

Main Office: 625-647 Third Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Wh 



erever you go 
ask for 



BUFFALO BREWING CO.'S 

LAGER BEER 

On Draught and in Bottles 
at Most First-Class Dealers. 



NEUHAUS & COMPANY 



Now 
at 



MERCHANT TAILORS 

133 Kearny Street ^^"fIo!^ 

To make you acquainted with our new location we will 
make you one of our $35.00 Suits or Overcoats to order 
for $20.00. Fit Guaranteed or No Sale. 
Phone Kearny 5938 (Formerly 5Q6 Market St., S. F., Cal.) 



SUMMONS. 
Justices' Court, F No. 33 
IN THE JUSTICES' COURT OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN 

FRANCISCO, STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 
EDWARD W. GUNTHER, -\ Action brought in the Justices' Court 

in the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, and Complaint filed in the office 
of Clerk of said Court. 

CHAD- 



vs. 
E. M. CHADBOURNE. 

Defendant 



THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA TO E. M. 
BOURNE. 

YOU ARE HEREBY DIRECTED to appear in action brought against 
you by the above named Plaintiff in the Justices' Court of the City and 
County of San Francisco, and to answer to the complaint filed therein; 
within five days (exclusive of the day of service) after the service on you 
of this summons, If served within this County, otherwise within twenty 
days. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you appear and answer as above 
required the said plaintiff will take judgment for any money or damages 
demanded in the Complaint, as arising upon contract, or plaintiff will 
apply to the Court for any other relief demanded In the Complaint. 

This action has been assigned, and you are directed to appear before 
Bernard J. Flood, Esq.. one of the Justices of said Court, at his office, 
City Hall, Market street, between Sth and 9th streets, in said City and 
County. 

Make legal service and due return hereon: By order of the Presiding Jus- 
tice of the Peace of the City and County of San Francisco. 

Given under my hand this December 13, 1913. 
EDWARD W. GUNTHER, 
Law and Collection Office, 
Kohl Building, Fifth Floor, 
Cor. Montgomery and California Sts. 

San Francisco. ROBERT W. DENNIS. Justices' Clerk 

Attorney for Plaintiff. By J. F. COLLINS, Deputy Clerk 

APPLICATION OF GUARDIAN FOR LEAVE TO MORTGAGE REAL ESTATE 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA. IN AND 

FOR THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
No. 11590. Dept. 10. 

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE AND GUARDIANSHIP OF ROB- 
ERT FRANCIS ATKINS, A MINOR. 

Upon reading the verified petition filed herein of Etta M. Blake, the 
guardian of the person and estate of Robert Francis Atkins, a minor, 
praying for an order permitting her to mortgage the property herein ami 
therein described, and good cause appearing therefor 

It is ordered that all persons interested in said estate appear before the 
above-entitled Court, at the courtroom of Dept. 10 thereof, situate at 
Room 519, in the City Hall located at No. 1231 south side of Market street 
in the City and County of San Francisco, State of California, on 
Monday, the 9tn day of February, IM.4, at the hour of ten o'clock a m. 
of said day, then and there to show cause if any they have why the realty 
described herein and In the petition on Mle herein should not ho mortgaged 

Tor the- sum of six Thousand Dollars ($6,000). or for such lesser ai nl 

as to the court may seem meet; said realty being particularly described 
as foil ■ 

All that certain lot. piece or parrel of land, situate, lying and being In 
the i i ■ and County of San Francisco, state of California, and particularly 
bounded and described as follows: 

COMMENCING at a point on the northerly line of Pino street, distant 
thereon 32 feel and 6 Inches westerly from the westerly line of Jones 
street; running thence westerly and along said northerly lino "i Pine 
streel 27 feet and G inches; thence at a right angle northerly S5 feet; 
at a right angle easterly 27 feet and 6 inches; thence at a right 
angle southerly 85 feet to the northerly line of Pine street and the point 
"i commi cement. Being a part of 50 Vara Lot No. 1082. 

IT is FURTHER ORDEREl > That this Order to Show Cause be pub- 
lished in the San Francisco News Li tter, a newspaper of general clrt illa- 
tion published in the City and County of San Franc«sco, State of Cali- 
fornia. 

Reference is hereby made to said petition of said guardian on file herein 
for further particulars. 

Dated: January 8th, 1914. 

THOS. F. GRAHAM. Judge. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
Joshua Hendy Iron Works. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Joshua Hendy 
Iron Works will he held at the office of the corporation. No. 75 Fremont 
street, San Francisco, California, on TUESDAY, the 10th day of February. 
1914. at the hour of 10 o'clock A. M.. for the purpose of electing a Board 
of Directors to serve for the ensuing year, and for the transaction of such 
other business as may come before the meeting. 

CHARLES C. GARDNER, Secretary. 
Office — No. 75 Fremont St., San Francisco Cal. 




Verily it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich automobilist to get by the cop on the beat. 





HflER 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




Vol. LXXXVII 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, January 24, 1914 



No. 4 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 21 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — S. L. Carman, representative, 156 Fifth Ave. 

Chicago Office — Jno. A. Tenney, 452 Peoples Gas Building, Chicago. 

Boston Office— Charles S. Parr, 525 Tremont Temple. 

London Office — George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Matter Intended for publication in the current number of the SAN 
FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER should 

be sent to the office not later than 5 p. m. Wednesday. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) — 1 year, $4.00; 6 months, $2.25. 
Foreign — 1 year, $6.00; 6 months, $3.26. 



A frontier despatch tells us that 4,300 Mexicans are in 

custody of 500 Americans. This is about a fair handicap. 

Fresno buyers blame George Shima, the Japanese "po- 
tato king," for the sharp advance in the price of spuds. The 
country is cursed with a superfluity of kings. 

Bearing testimony perhaps to the controling influence of 

sunspots, a Chico small boy caught a fish on Main street of 
that town last week, after he had chased it a city block. 

Linval H. Castle, assistant cashier of the Bank of Italy, 

and Dr. Bolton, of Burlingame, the other day captured a sack- 
ful of wild ducks so cluttered up with crude oil that they could 
not fly. Some means of stopping the dumping of oil in the bay 
should be applied. 

Early registration figures perhaps do not mean much, 

but the Progressive prophets feel constrained to find cold com- 
fort for the apparently impressive plurality of Republican elec- 
tors by attributing it to the "sheer momentum of custom," or the 
opening of a big sack. Fudge! 

An ingenious printer on a San Francisco daily described 

Dr. George C. Pardee as "President of the State Conversation 
Commission." By a simple confusion of types the printer pro- 
duces the maximum of change with the minimum of effort, and 
we never know whether he really meant it. 

Jones of the Santa Cruz Municipal Commission is a 

convinced prohibitionist, but his convictions in this regard did 
not prohibit his acceptance of $1,500 worth of wines and liquors 
to offset a big water bill owed to the city by an insolvent hotel 
company. To be sure, there is scriptural warrant for turning 
water into wine. 

A lively movement is afoot to buy out the toll road to 

Yosemite, known as the Big Oak Flat route. It now costs $10 
for every auto load of five people that goes to Yosemite over 
this road. Secretary Lane urges the condemnation or acquisi- 
tion at private sale for public use of all toll roads connecting 
with the valley. 

It is gratifying to learn that $600,000 needed for the 

erection and equipment of a hospital for the medical school of 
the University of California has been made up by private sub- 
scriptions. Of this sum the Crocker family contributed $150,- 
000. This institution will give San Francisco a first-class medi- 
cal school, which it needs. 



Edward Berwick, of Pacific Grove, justly remarks that 

"worst incubus of all is the burden, growing yearly heavier 
and more intolerable, of naval and military expenditure, which 
amounted in 1911 to $441,066,426, while this year our navy 
alone wants $146,000,000, and the world at large staggers un- 
der a $32,000,000,000 load of debt." 

A Marysville despatch concerning the trial of the I, W. 

W. rioters says of the jurors that "one of these is a jani- 
tor." This mysterious intimation dropped without further ex- 
planation might seem to imply that a new and strange human 
species had been discovered. What is the exact significance 
of a janitor on a jury? Would a jury of janitors constitute an 
ideal tribunal ? 

Policeman Anderson, of the Alameda sea squad, is a 

good lawyer, and has no hesitation about interpreting the recent 
Supreme Court decision concerning tidelands. Acting on his 
view of the law, he warns duck shooters away from the tide- 
lands on the Alameda south shore, which he decides are now 
within the city limits. 'Tis a competent policeman that can 
tell what the Supreme Court means. 

The State Insurance Department created by the new 

Workmen's Compensation law refuses to insure the employees 
of Los Angeles city against injury by accident, on the ground 
that the risk is too great. Now what is the value of an official 
insurance scheme that will take only the cream of the business, 
where the risk is trifling? In a word, the State wants to bet 
on a sure thing. 

Almost anybody can be a weather prophet, and get 

away with it this season, but the Merced Sun still sticks to the 
old reliable rule of the corn doctor, and is certain that "after 
all there is only one sure way of knowing in advance what sort 
of weather is coming. If your corns hurt like the dickens, it's 
going to rain. If you haven't any corns, don't make any pre- 
dictions. 

The long tale of mysteries arising out of classifications 

under the tariff opened a new chapter last week when it was 
decided that the immortal part of a Chinese pheasant, which is 
feathers, cannot be received by Uncle Sam unless the bird was 
raised in captivity. The untamed fowl of the jungle is barred, 
dead or alive, and Collector Davis, like an angel with a flaming 
sword, guards the gate against entry by any contraband bird. 

A newspaper tale related the other day how Collector 

Davis, in the course of a voyage in a revenue cutter up the 
Sacramento River imposed fines amounting to $1,200 on the 
owners of launches and other craft for failure to comply with 
the Federal regulations concerning lights to be carried and 
other navigation rules. Are we to understand that the Collec- 
tor of the Port is invested with judicial powers to impose fines 
after a drum-head court martial? Doubtless what the Collec- 
tor did was to order the offenders to appear in court and get 
their medicine. 



rancisco 



Jews 




January 24, 1914. 



MMEWT 



Frank H. Short, of Fresno, writes 
Where the Load Falls, for the Republican of that city a 

paper in which he says of the Pro- 
gressives that "no other political party, including the old Popu- 
list party, was ever so strong for purely atmospheric things," 
and adds that "starting for everywhere, it has got nowhere," 
because it never has really faced any national question and no- 
body knows what its position would have been on the tariff, 
finance or any real national question. Undoubtedly this is the 
weak place in the Progressive program, so far as it may expect 
to cut a figure in national affairs. With regard to actual meas- 
ures originating with the Progressives, more especially in Cali- 
fornia, Mr. Short writes : 

"The plain, unvarnished truth is, however, that the in- 
dustries of the country are sick almost unto death from 
the administration of political cure-alls, political nostrums 
and political quackery. There exists absolutely no other 
reason for any lack of progress, prosperity, industry or 
employment in this country, except political quackery. 
No doubt at all there has been some delayed and needed 
legislation in California within the last few years that, if 
we had had no other kind would have proven beneficial. 
While the necessity was less definite, there was doubtless 
some need of national legislation, and perhaps some of the 
legislation that has been enacted within the last year has 
some justification and will prove of some benefit, but along 
with this sensible and wholesome legislation, especially in 
the State, we have had an unprecedented flood of wholly 
pernicious, purely meddlesome, office-creating, tax-exact- 
ing, industry hampering legislation that is beginning to 
bear its legitimate fruit. The conditions in California are 
simply bursting for progress, advancement and prosperity. 
The completion of the Panama Canal, the development of 
new and hitherto unknown sources of wealth and industry 
has put California in the front rank of all places in the 
world where the people ought to be happy." 
Undoubtedly, as Mr. Short remarks, there has been some 
useful legislation in California originating with Progressive 
control, but at the same time there has been a flood of med- 
dlesome enactments that have created a feeling of uncertainty 
in the public mind that has been reflected in business and in- 
dustrial conditions. At the same time, no other party that ever 
controlled legislation in California has ever created so many 
new tax-eating commissions and offices that were chiefly 
needed to provide a living for the faithful and strengthen the 
political machine. 

It is true that under the existing revenue system of the State 
the effects of these additional burdens on the taxpaying com- 
munity will not become immediately visible because the money 
required to run the State government is collected by a tax on 
the corporations, chiefly those engaged in furnishing public 
service. This, of course, is an indirect tax on the whole people, 
and must eventually come out of the common pocket to the 
grave enhancement of the cost of living. All taxes paid by the 
public service corporations are under the State laws accounted 
as part of their legitimate expenses, which must be allowed for 
and provided out of the rates fixed and regulated by the gov- 
erning bodies entrusted with that duty. In other words, the 
corporation tax is levied indirectly on the whole people, al- 
though that fact is cunningly disguised. As in the case of 
other indirect taxes, the system is vicious because it promotes 
extravagance in government, and a feeling of irresponsibility 
in the legislature. The politicians see their opportunity to 
fatten themselves by imposing new burdens on the public ser- 
vice corporations, which have no friends, and the people do not 
realize that they must ultimately carry the load. 




Concerning the 
Weather Prophets. 



A scientific controversy of large in- 
terest even to the unscientific by- 
stander has arisen over the Rev. 
Father Ricard's theory of the in- 
fluence of sunspots on the weather. The plain man is not com- 
petent to decide which of the learned controversialists is in the 
right, and as we find the highest authorities divided, the lay- 
man is left to make up his mind on the rainfall figures which 
undoubtedly for the present season have seemed in large 
measure to confirm Father Ricard's theory. So far as astro- 
nomical and meteorological authority is concerned, we find the 
learned doctors at variance. Director Campbell of the Lick 
Observatory declares that Father Ricard's theory is negligible. 
On the other hand, Professor See of the Mare Island Observa- 
tory declares that he believes the Ricard theory to be sound. 
Professor Leuschner, who teaches astronomy in the University 
of California, is non-committal on the subject. With the tech- 
nical fe-atures of the controversy we need not pretend to deal, 
but Director Campbell may be quoted when he describes two 
popular factors that affect the public mind in this relation, to 
wit: 

"Attention should be called to two other points, one 
physical and the other psychological. The Pacific Coast 
line does not run north and south, but from northwest to 
southeast, embracing a wide range of longitude as well as 
latitude. The tendency of storms is to travel from west to 
east. It consequently follows that there is greater uncer- 
• tainty in determining the exact time when a storm actually 
strikes the coast. Coming to the psychological point, it is 
a recognized trait of human nature that the successful pro- 
phecies within the month are remembered more tenaciously 
than the failures, especially when the review of conditions 
for the month call attention to the former and omit all 
reference to the latter." 

The layman may be permitted to observe that a certain 
vagueness of terminology attends on this controversy. None of 
the disputants seem to have thought it worth while to define a 
storm. If one might be permitted an inference from the written 
words, it would seem that a storm is anything, from a shower to 
a blizzard, and a prophecy is fulfilled when any weather dis- 
turbance within these limits strikes some part of a territory ex- 
tending for upwards of two thousand miles. As Director 
Campbell points out, Father Ricard is shooting at a big target. 
On the other hand, the padre comes back at his critics in this 
wise: 

"Some of these wise men say I have made mistakes. I 
am more interested in my mistakes than in my success. I 
am told I am too indefinite. Do they think I am the Al- 
mighty? Yet in 200 years those who have studied the 
weather have never been able to discover the direction of 
storms after they start. It is precisely in that knowledge 
that I have been indefinite. Nor has the weather bureau 
been less so. All I know is that the storm track depends 
upon the vacillation in latitude of the sun spots. It is for 
the purpose of studying this question and getting more 
acurate knowledge that we need at Santa Clara a great 
equatorial telescope." 

It will not be denied, whether the fact is due to coincident 
and nothing more or not. that there has been a remarkable de- 
gree of correspondence this season between Father Ricard's 
predictions and the actual course of events as they have devel- 
oped this winter. Not only is this true of the weather, but his 
remarkable forecasts of earthquakes in Japan has been verified 
in the event. 



January 24, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



All California without regard for 
Senator Newland's political considerations or affilia- 

Comprehensive Plan. tions, will get behind Senator New- 
land's comprehensive plan for the 
development of the inland waterways of the State. Senator 
Newlands proposes to meet in a statesmanlike way by a single 
operation three of the most pressing problems that confront the 
people of California, and more particularly those resident in 
the great interior valley that stretches from Shasta on the north 
to Kern on the south. 

A considerable part of this fertile region '.-. semi-arid, or 
in other words is largely dependent on irrigation to compass 
its fullest productivity. Another considerable section of the 
valley suffers in wet years from disastrous floods. Finally, 
the major portion of this territory relies on river navigation to 
carry its freight and keep down railroad rates. 

These in brief are the prime needs of the valley, and Senator 
Newlands proposes to meet all three requirements by the sim- 
ple but of course costly plan of confining the flood waters of the 
Sierra streams in a comprehensive system of reservoirs. By 
this plan, the winter floods will be confined and stored for sum- 
mer use for irrigation of the valley lands, the creation of elec- 
tric current and the equalization of the summer flow in the navi- 
gable streams. 

Such are the outlines of a magnificent and enlightened under- 
taking in which the State and Federal governments will be 
asked to share the cost. There is no reason to doubt that the 
consent of Congress will be obtained, with a little effort, and 
the needful appropriations will be forthcoming. The plan as 
laid down by Senator Newlands is merely an extension of the 
principle embodied in the reclamation undertakings. It is in 
fact a dual scheme of reclamation in that it proposes to provide 
water to irrigate a semi-arid region and at the same time and 
by the same operation to ensure the lowlands of the river delta 
against floods. Moreover, the plan is designed to develop in- 
land navigation, for which purpose Federal appropriations are 
constantly making. 



Weeding Out 
The Lame Ducks. 



Apparently the enactment of the 
"blue sky" law by the legislature of 
California has had results long be- 
fore the statute becomes effective. 
The annual report of the Secretary of State shows a material 
decrease in the volume of new capitalization put on the market 
by home and foreign corporations. According to that report, 
the aggregate capitalization of 3,871 domestic and foreign cor- 
porations organized or admitted to do business in the State dur- 
ing the past calendar year totaled $695,819,356, a decrease of 
$370,058,631, as compared with the preceding year. These fig- 
ures need not be regarded as proof of a decline in the legitimate 
business and industry of the State, but is rather an indication 
that the California field has become an unhealthy location for 
swindling enterprises masquerading in corporate form. 

It is true that the so-called "blue sky" law has not yet gone 
into effect, because its operation is held up pending its submis- 
sion on referendum to a vote on ratification or otherwise at the 
coming general election. It is the fact that the petitions to 
validate this referendum were set afoot by certain agencies in 
Los Angeles which have heretofore been active in promoting 
dubious incorporated enterprises that made their profit in the 
favorite industry of those parts popularly known as "trim- 
ming the tourist." The law was intended to put a spoke in the 
wheel of the get rich quick industrials who live by setting 
traps for the unwary. There has been an automatic elimination 
of the lame ducks. 



Professor George M. Stratton, of 
Thk Exaltation the University of California, has 

Of the Bully. prepared and will shortly deliver a 

course of lectures on the "Psychol- 
ogy of Fighting," with a view to indicating means and meas- 
ures to control the warlike and quarrelsome instincts that time 
out of mind have perplexed and troubled the nations and 
brought endless woes upon the world. Like the sexual instinct, 
that other cause of perpetual trouble for men and women, 
he believes that the fighting spirit can be controlled and regu- 
lated by wise counsel and expedient measures. To expound 
these views, Professor Stratton has prepared for the American 
Association for International Conciliation an article in which he 
explains the tenor of his plans for the object he desires as fol- 
lows: 

"Now in these, as in all other large problems of the kind, 
there can be no serious doubt as to which has proved the 
wise, the only practical way. It is, to prohibit certain 
manifestations of the instinct, but not its entire exercise. 
Prohibit the possession of slaves, but not possessions. 
Prohibit polygamy, but not marriage. Keep open the bet- 
ter way ; put barriers at the worse. And so it must be with 
the fighting instinct. It is in us, it must become of use. 
It must be exercised, but only under the counsel of a calm 
wisdom." 

Professor Stratton wisely recognizes the fact that the inborn 
qualities and instincts of human nature must be reckoned with 
as facts which under a wise and temperate regulation may be 
turned to useful purpose, or at least made harmless. He illus- 
trates his thesis by outlining the means by which mankind is 
agreed to control the sexual instincts, and he says : 

"There are two courses open with regard to the love 
which men have for women and women for men. This is a 
troublesome instinct; all know the misery it has brought 
to the world. And here again the negative and positive 
courses have had their earnest advocates. The one way 
has been to renounce all such affection; renounce the as- 
sociation that it is apt to give to life; renounce marriage. 
The other way is to take this wild thing and tame it. It 
must play its part in life, no longer as a wayward and con- 
suming impulse, but something constant and generous." 

Pursuing the analogy, Professor Stratton urges several means 
of keeping the fighting instinct under control with a view to 
putting an end to wars between the nations. He instances the 
telegraph, the newspaper, the railway and the ocean steamer as 
part of the essential mechanism of international peace. He 
urges a fuller perfection of the machinery of delay because as 
he declares the fighting instinct "fattens on instant action and 
pales with delay." In -the Hague tribunal and the arbitration 
court he finds the promise of future world peace. 

Admitting fully the beneficial character and purpose of the 
machinery by which Professor Stratton proposes to control the 
fighting spirit it should be pointed out that the analogy which 
he draws between the spirit of militarism and the sexual instinct 
is by no means complete, nor are the cases parallel. The sex- 
ual instinct was given to the human race for a useful and nec- 
essary purpose — the perpetuation of the species. As for the 
fighting spirit which undoubtedly afflicts the race it is difficult 
to see what good or useful purpose it fulfills. It is in the final 
analysis the exaltation of the bully. 

■XT 

The ready acceptance of the new currency law by the 

banks throughout the State appears from the fact that fourteen 
national banks and one State bank of the twenty-four commer- 
cial banks in Fresno County have made application for mem- 
bership in the Federal reserve banking system, and it is prob- 
able that all but three of the county banks will come in. 



San F 



rancisco 



News Letter 



January 24, 1914. 



THE CANDID FRIEND 

Short Supply of Johnsons-The California Tradition— What Registration Figures Show- 

The Progressive Programme— Grabbing the Republican Nomination— Mistaken 

for a Lady— A Work of Reference in boots— Some Fierce Democracy 

The Padre of the Rains 

BY EDWARD F. CAHILL 



There are hats enough in the ring, but most of them are out 
of fashion, and others are badly battered or shopworn. An 
amusing perplexity besets the Progressives. With them it is 
not a case of too much Johnson, but too little. There are not 
enough Johnsons to go around and make up the slate. One fac- 
tion of his party wants him to run for the Senate and another 
for Governor. Doubtless, if they could multiply him they 
would run him for Secretary of State, likewise to confound the 
artful machinations of Frank Jordan. In effect, it is a one can- 
didate party, and Hiram Johnson is expected to pack the whole 
load. 

Long ago it was foreshadowed in these columns that Hiram 
Johnson would be compelled by the pressure of machine poli- 
tics to run again for Governor. It is no secret that his dearly 
cherished ambition has been to run for the Senate, but the 
politicians and the piebiters of the party saw themselves fobbed 
off with a wooden man for head of the State ticket. Johnson 
must save the party which, in the politician's sense, means the 
great and ever growing patronage in the Governor's gift. The 
Gubernatorial office is no agreeable job for a highly nervous 
and easily irascible man like Hiram Johnson, but although he 
held out for months, he was in the end compelled to come down 
and become a martyr to the call of partisan duty. 
8 "8 8 

Sizes Up the Situation. 

Brother Mappes puts the situation tersely in the Fresno Mir- 
ror, to wit: 

"The important political news of the week was the an- 
nouncement of Governor Johnson's candidacy for re-elec- 
tion. The pie biters, from Siskiyou to San Diego gave a 
sigh of relief when they heard the news. There are many 
more of them under this reform administration than there 
were under the preceding perform administration, so the 
sigh caused quite a breeze. They look up to Johnson with 
the faith and fondness of a spaniel, and now that he has 
decided to take hold of the leash they feel safe. The in- 
decision of Johnson gave them a big scare, however, and 
if he had refused to run again for Governor they would 
undoubtedly have turned and bitten the hand that fed 
them." 

W S S 

The California Tradition. 

Can Johnson overcome the California tradition that no Gov- 
ernor since John Bigler has ever been elected for a second 
term? Obviously he cannot, on the registration figures unless 
he can draw to himself a large proportion of the voters who are 
daily aligning themselves with the Republican party. This, 
of course, is the hope and plan of the Progressives. In fact, the 
program is to make Johnson the candidate of the Republican 
and Progressive parties both. At the outset of the forthcoming 
campaign in the early summer it is the plan to seize once more 
the organization of the Republican party, and repeat the trick 
of 1912 by which the regular Republicans were denied the op- 
portunity to vote for a candidate of their own party. We may 
confidently expect to see a hot campaign waged within the 



party to capture at the primaries the Republican organization in 
the Progressive interest, and to make Hiram Johnson the nomi- 
nee of the party which he has denounced and repudiated. It 
is a highly interesting situation. 

8 & 5 

No Legally Constituted Committee. 

There is, in fact, at present no legally constituted Republi- 
can State Committee and organization in California. There is 
of course, a body recognized as such by the national Repub- 
lican committee, but it has no legal standing under the laws of 
California. That does not matter greatly, perhaps, because the 
campaign for the general State election will be conducted by 
the body constituted by the primary vote. 
5 S ? 

A Hot Primary. 

The situation foreshadows a hot primary campaign for con- 
trol of the Republican party. The Progressive primary will 
probably be tame because Johnson's nomination for Governor 
will be uncontested. For the Senate, the only Progressives in 
the field are Heney and Rowell, with Rowell hanging back in 
hesitating mood. With regard to this conflict, Mappes writes 
that Rowell, "instead of doing things, he would argue things, 
and he has the unfortunate habit of arguing on both sides of a 
question." 

To be sure, and why not? Rowell might be described as a 
standard work of reference, the eminent Why's Why of Cali- 
fornia, and as such he belongs on the shelf. 
K K K 

Not a Lady. 

Mappes goes on to describe the embarrassing situation of 
Florence O'Brien of Chico, whose injudicious parents loaded 
him down with a name of dubious implication thus: 

"For Secretary of State on the Progressive ticket, F. J. 
O'Brien of Chico will probably be a candidate. He was 
defeated by Frank Jordan in 1910, and attributes his de- 
feat to the mistake he made in allowing his name to go on 
the ballot as Florence J. O'Brien, creating the impression 
that he was a lady. To prove that he is not a lady he will 
go on the ballot this time as F. J. O'Brien." 
V "8 V 

His Alphabetical Disguise. 

It is hard to tell. Who knows but the lady vote will resent 
the implied imputation. Florence runs the Chico Enterprise, 
and makes a good paper despite his bisexual name. So the 
other day he inquired in print, "Is a middle-aged woman in a 
bathing suit a thing of beauty?" and thereupon Mrs. Clare 
Davis, in the Stockton Mail, caught him up like this: 

"Shame on you, 'Flossie O'Brien! There aren't any 
middle-aged women any more. They are all either young 
or old, and there are very few old women in California." 

Be sure your name will find you out, Florence, notwithstand- 
ing any paltry alphabetical disguise. On such trivial issues 
may the fate of nations hang, and you know, Frank Jordan is 
regarded as the evil one in Progressive circles. 



January 24, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



Scarcity of Candidates. 

Indeed, the Progressives are so hard up for available can- 
didates that they even talk of commandeering the services of 
John Eshleman to run for Lieutenant-Governor, taking him off 
the Railroad Commission where he is needed. As an alterna- 
tive, they propose to run State Treasurer Roberts for this office 
and he is quoted as saying: "If a majority of the Progressives 
want me to run, and I am acceptable to Governor Johnson, 
I might accept." Mr. Roberts seems to have got the cart before 
the horse. He should find out first of all if he is acceptable to 
Governor Johnson. 

5 "8 §• 

Conflict of Science and Sentiment. 

Commissioner of Public Safety F. C. Turner, of Oakland, is 
a determined votary of science as opposed to sentiment, and 
he is not to be frightened off his scientific base by any anony- 
mous or illiterate threats. The other day he voted against a 
proposition to end the practice of giving dogs from the Oakland 
pound to the Stanford Medical School for vivisection and he 
thus declared himself : 

"Mankind has reaped great benefit from the research 
of scientists who have been working with living organisms. 
I think the balance is in favor of the real humanitarian 
achievements of science." 

■& S Sr 

Cannot Be Scared Off. 

Then he turned over to the police the following illiterate and 
anonymous threatening letter : 

"Corn's Turner: You have acted like a canibal on the dog 
question. We are American patriachs in this country, a 
good portion of us, and will not be used as cats paws any 
more such as you and the majority of your city board. Be- 
ware of tar and feathers and the lamp post. It's about 
time the vigilance committee arrose again." 

Notwithstanding the intrepid and perhaps perilous position 
taken by the commissioner, his colleagues voted against him, 
and rescinded the order granting selected dogs to Stanford Uni- 
versity. Nevertheless, the University of California and the 
Oakland Medical College continue to be supplied as before. 

S S S 
His Fierce Democracy. 

I have heretofore remarked the fierce democracy of C. K. Mc- 
Clatchy that illumines the columns of the Sacramento Bee, 
and now I find him scorching the fads and follies of society in 
the capital like this : 

"Slowly but surely the rough pioneer spirit of Sacra- 
mento is yielding to the refining influences of civilization. 
Pink teas in the afternoon, scandal, art, divorce, the higher 
drama, white slavery analysis, contortions of the soul, and 
discussion of diseases are common in Sacramento. 

"And the crown of refined refinement, the badge of nobil- 
ity and the essence of the cultured soul have come to sanc- 
tify this formerly rough depot to the mines. 

"The monocle, one-eyed glass, tortoise-rimmed, is 
among us, redeemed from its formerly lowly position on 
the vaudeville stage and placed with those of an intelli- 
gence to appreciate it in Sacramento society. 

"The monocle has been the finishing touch of Chester- 
fieldan dress at Sacramento dances this winter. On a long 
black silk ribbon it hangs suspended from the neck, a thin, 
dark line against the white shirt bosom of the full dress 
of Sacramento's effete. 

"The smarter people are hoping that the use of the mon- 
ocle will not become common, for general use ruins exclu- 
siveness. So far, it has been successfully confined to 
high school social favorites. University dancing men and 
the younger set of Sacramento society. Its use by mer- 
chants or tradespeople, or even newspapermen, is frowned 
upon by the leaders, for it is hoped to retain some distin- 
guishing barrier between the classes." 



To the guillotine with the one-eyed aristocrats. A bas le mon- 

5 V S 
able Manners. 

From the Sacramento Union one learns- the latest official re- 
quirements in the way of civil service reform as laid down by 
late board in this wise: 

Personality and fitness,' to be determined by oral 
questioning, hereafter will count twenty-five per cent in 
State civil service examinations where these qualities are 
thought necessary in positions to be filled. This announce- 
ment was made here yesterday by the State Commission. 
"The 'personality and fitness' examination, given only 
to those who have passed a written examination, is to be 
judged by the following standard: Visual inspection, 
twenty per cent; voice, ten per cent; personal neatness, ten 
per cent; culture and refinement, twenty per cent; aptitude, 
forty per cent. 

"President Reed said that in each instance where a 'per- 
sonality and fitness' test is to be given to candidates of one 
particular line of work, the markings would be made by 
the head of a department familiar with the qualifications 
necessary in such employment." 

Presumably the code of social observance described by the 
careless as "table manners" will take a heavy count in the list 
of qualifications. No man who makes inarticulate animal noises 
when eating his soup can hold a job under the State. 

«■ Sf "S 
A Stiff Controversialist. 

"The padre of the rains," our favorite prophet, Father Ricard, 
is a stiff controversialist, and what Allan Breck would have 
called "a bonny fighter." Some time ago a rash weather sharp 
on the Scientific American thought he would like to pick a quar- 
rel with Father Ricard, and his sunspot theory, and this ill- 
advised debater got it out of his system under the heading 
"Chimerical Weather Forecasting." Now this is the way the 
padre came back: 

"The article betrays a mind which feels little at home in 
the sanctuary of science, is not over-burdened with ideas, 
abounds in verbiage, gives no facts, does not prove any- 
thing, but mistakes a few small arguments, is arrogant 
and insulting and such a stranger to polite literature as to 
indulge in names that are more redolent of the cabaret 
than of the halls of science." 

Now'will the padre be good enough to call off his sun dogs 
for a spell! California has gone wet. 



'ding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



(Ad»erti»fii.'r,i 



CHAMPAGNE 



PIPERHEIDSIECK 



Anc n - e M°. n HEIDSIECK fondee en 1785 
KUNKELMANN&C?Succ r - s 

REIMS 



Charles Meinecke &. Co. 



AalNTS Pacific Coast 



314 SACRAMENTO ST., S. F. 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 24, 1914. 




Violations of the civil service law are reported by the 

Sacramento Union, which declares that for several days certain 
State officials have been circulating among the employees 
papers of enrollment in political clubs for action in the coming 
campaign. The civil service law expressly forbids any State 
official to "solicit or receive or be in any manner concerned in 
soliciting or receiving any assessment, subscription, contribu- 
tion or political service whatever from any one holding any 
position under the provisions of this act." Now is the time to 
determine whether the act means what it says, or was merely a 
piece of political bunk. 

Among other embarrassing problems arising under the 

Workmen's Compensation law is the liability of counties and 
;ities for accidents to their employees. These liabilities are 
multifarious and perplexing. For instance, San Bernardino 
pays its county jail prisoners 35 cents a day for work on the 
roads, and the District Attorney says the county is liable to 
them for compensation in case of accident. Moreover, the 
county would be liable should a Superior Court judge fall out 
of his chair or break his leg climbing the eminence which we 
call the bench. 

Miners in the Sierra are shipping gold bars by parcel 

post. Some time ago the express company withdrew its 
agencies on certain routes in Sierra County, and the stage com- 
panies refused to take the risk on gold shipments. Recently 
the miners found an insurance company in this city willing to 
take the risk on shipments by parcel post, and accordingly that 
plan is in steady operation. The gold is cast in $1,000 bars. 
The only objection to the plan is that for greater security the 
shipments are made with as much secrecy as possible, so that 
the camp loses an advertisement. 

Commissioner Cator, of the city election board, in a 

well reasoned paper urges that in State, as now in municipal 
politics, the ballot be divorced from partisanship, so that can- 
didates shall go to the people without any one of the customary 
party labels. Obviously the national party names and affilia- 
tions have no significance or bearing on State politics, and only 
serve to confuse the voter in this relation. At the same time, 
Mr. Cator's plan would make the primary ballot a portentous 
affair, measured in feet rather than in inches. 

The Los Angeles Express the other day ran a two-col- 
umn despatch from San Francisco with a scare head reading, 
"Nob Hill Sinks; Bay City Buildings Crack and Crumble." 
The body of the story declared that "Nob Hill, long a landmark 
of San Francisco, is sodden with rain water, and slowly set- 
tling." This is the sort of stuff that we describe as "important 
if true," but possibly it would be called good news in Los An- 
geles, quite irrespective of truth. Has anybody here seen Nob 
Hill shrink? 

George Mason, financial secretary of the Oakland 

Chamber of Commerce, is inured to extremes of weather by his 
habit of sleeping outdoors, so last week, when the furious gale 
blew away the cover of his porch he went on calmly sleeping, 
regardless of the elemental crash and the insinuating damp- 
ness. Come wind, come rain, he protests he will persist if he 
has to sleep in gum boots. Devotion to fresh air becomes a re- 
ligion, and Mason is the stuff of which martyrs are made. 



Mayor Rolph did wisely in referring the whole matter 

of cemetery removals to a vote of the people at the coming elec- 
tion. It seems more than probable that the popular vote will 
go against the measure, and this may be said in face of the fact 
that very active agitation has been maintained to push the 
proposition through the legislature and the Board of Super- 
visors. This activity is due to the fact that the supporters of 
the removal plans were well financed in the interest of a real 
estate deal, whereas the opposition was largely disorganized 
and scattering. We are convinced that the majority sentiment 
of the city is opposed to the removal of the cemeteries at this 
time. 

The San Mateo town trustees know how to play the 

favorite official game known as "passing the buck." Mrs. 
Katherine Gettings wrote to the board complaining that gam- 
bling was rife in the town and requesting the suppression of the 
same. She declared that her youthful sons had been keeping 
late hours, and she knew that gambling was responsible for 
this. The trustees protested that they knew of no gambling in 
San Mateo, but offered to have the police keep a watchful eye 
on the lady's sons. Mrs. Gettings very properly replied that 
such action "would brand the boys as criminals, which they are 
not." She further inquired: "If my boys were placed under 
police restraint, what of the hundreds of other mothers' sons?" 
Mrs. Gettings seems to have had the best of the argument. 

Mappes of the Fresno Mirror declares that his neighbor, 

Editor Rowell, would rather "argue than do things," and has, 
besides, an unfortunate capacity for arguing on both sides of a 
question. Now pat upon this pithy characterization comes the 
announcement that Rowell has filed in Sacramento a strenuous 
protest against the new automobile tax, urging that the law is 
unconstitutional because it is oppressive, partial, unreasonable 
and tends to restrain the liberty of the citizen, besides being 
against public policy. It may be a perfectly good protest, but 
it does not hitch with Rowell's repeated editorials urging other 
people to pay the tax, and roasting all those who doubted the 
constitutionality of the measure. Rowell drives a facile pen. 

It is a strange habit of the Chamber of Commerce of the 

United States to speak of Northern California and Southern 
California as if they were separate States like the Carolinas. 
To be sure, the Chamber merely recognizes the advertising 
habits of the people south of Tehachapi, so that they need not 
complain because a recent report on business conditions by the 
Chamber attributes a high prosperity and progress to North- 
ern California, while Southern California is represented as de- 
pressed owing to the severe freeze of last winter, and the 
drought of last summer. 

Be careful not to keep a pet wolf and a butler at the same 

time as part of your domestic environment, unless indeed you 
insure the butler against accidental injury. This valuable les- 
son is learned from the expensive experience of Princess Paul 
Troubetskoy, who kept a pet wolf which bit a piece out of her 
butler's leg, who sued the princess for damages before a judge 
who sternly rebuked the lady for keeping a wild animal as a 
pet — a revival of the customs of decaying Rome. It was but 
a small bite of leg that the wolf got, because the butler would 
not stand still, but it cost the princess $400. 

Judge Buck, of the San Mateo Superior Court, told the 

grand jury that no public official, including himself, is worth 
$4,000 a year. His Honor is hasty. San Francisco paid Wash- 
ington Dodge $8,000 a year as Assessor, and he resigned be- 
cause he could earn more at another job. Neither is Judge Buck 
expected to cover any part of his munificent salary back into 
the county treasury. 



January 24, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 




JL iMiililiif '* f ' r aUtf 




S WAND 



"Wc of>ey no wand hu/ Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 



PAUL GERSON. 




T/ze Orpheum. 

First and foremost in the program this week I would 
place that sterling actor, Frank Keenan, who presents 
himself in an act written by Willard Mack, who was 
seen here a few months ago in "Kick In," another act 
of his own composition. Mack is becoming ambitious. 
The act he has provided for Keenan does not allow this 
fine actor the opportunity he deserves. There is a fair 
amount of interest developed, but the big situations 
which existed in the act he had on his last Orpheum 
tour, are not there. Keenan is so artistic in everything 
which he does that it is really a pleasure for those who 
appreciate good acting to watch him. In his present 
act he enacts an old soldier whose son is to be hanged. 
He comes to the Governor to plead for his life. The 
Governor is also an old soldier, and naturally things 
develop in such a case which makes it look rosy for 
the condemned man by the time the act closes. There 
is a little woman on the bill this week, Edna Showal- 
ter is her name, who sings with a purity of tone and 
with a high soprano voice which is destined to make 
a big figure of her in operatic circles one of these days. 
She sings several big grand opera numbers in a man- 
ner which brings tumultuous applause. As an Orpheum 
attraction she is a big success. Bert Fitzgibbon ex- 
ploits himself in a conglomeration of nonsense and ab- 
surdities which you must laugh at. It is all so outright 
silly, that you wonder why you laugh. He is easily one 
of the real hits of the performance. The present craze 
for the latest freak dances has led the Orpheum to 
bring out two more exponents of the very latest things 
in the terpsichorean art. An agreeable looking gentle- 
man who calls himself Maurice, and his wife, show us- 
what are presumed to be the last word in the various 
kinds of tango. Personally, I was never strong for the 
turkey trot and the bunny hug and the rag dances, and 
in all candor I cannot see anything to enthuse about 
in the dances which Maurice and his wife do, but the 
public at this time are out and out dance mad, so Mau- 
rice is hailed as a tremendous success, and his services 
locally are much in demand. We had the Cranes here 
only the other day, showing us their idea of these 
dances. In the matter of grace, I prefer the Cranes, 
though Maurice can probably do more whirls and side 
stepping than the other chap. At this stage of the 
game, the audiences applaud them vigorously, and they 
are voted a great success. Tangoism is the vogue to- 
day, and the Orpheum people are giving the public 
what they want. 

Albert Von Tilzer, who is responsible for many of the 
well known song successes of the day, comes in per- 
son in introduce some of his latest efforts. He is un- 
happy in not having a good partner, and not having his 
act arranged in a manner which the public like. If he 
would make prominent in his repertoire his best known 
songs, the audience would take cognizance and applaud ac- 
cordingly. Martin Johnson, who was the only white man to 
make the entire trip with Jack London when the latter made 
his memorable cruise in his little boat, "The Snark," presents 
moving pictures and stereopticon views of the many strange 
people they encountered in the South Sea Islands. The views 
are very fine, and show in an amazing manner the strange cus- 
toms of these curious people. The act is novel, and is also 
intensely interesting. Sharp and Turek do a black face stunt 
which is much appreciated. The man is a good dancer and 
works very hard. Fred Lindsay, the Australian Bushman and 
whip expert, is back again, and his extraordinary act is much 
liked. The show as a whole has much to commend it, and the 
usual capacity audiences are ever in evidence. 




Andrew Mack, America's foremost Irish comedian, who will 
appear in "The Way to Kcnmare," at the Alcazar next week. 



"Antony and Cleopatra." 

At the Savoy the famous and sensational production of "An- 
tony and Cleopatra" this week completes its long run, and has 
done a great business notwithstanding the inclemency of the 
weather. Good music supplied by Hans Koenig and his asso- 
ciates makes a feature. 

• * • 

•The Battle of Shiloh." 

At the Tivoli, a moving picture of "The Battle of Shiloh" has 
been the feature of the week. It is a story of love and war, in- 
troducing many personages of historical note, such as General 
U. S. Grant, commanding the Federal army, and General Albert 
Sydney Johnson, who led the Confederate forces and was killed 
in this battle. It is a thrilling story of a critical day in the his- 
tory of the United States. 



10 



San F 



rancisco 




News Letter January 24 ' 1914 ' 

role was very good. He is a fine looking chap, with many 
qualities to commend him. Edward McCormick, another new 
man, was fine in a character role, of which he made much. Mack 
also brings his own leading woman, Louise Hamilton. This 
young lady scored a big success in her first part, and is evi- 
dently an actress of attainments. She has much in her favor, 
and in her several scenes with Mack she shone with much lustre. 
Anr.ie Mack Berlein, the last of the new people, is seen in a 
very clever character role, and crept in the favor of the audience 
wi.h litt'e difficulty. Miss Berlein is one of the big successes 
of the play. Besides these players there remains the old guard 
of the company, who all do themselves full justice in their re- 
spective ro?es. Bert Wesner is very good indeed in a comedy 



Gaiety Theatre 



' PFarroll, Opposite Orpheum 

I'hone Suiter 111! 



EVERV NIGHT. Commencing Monday. January 20th. 

The Great American Cot Iran 

MARIE DRESSLER 
In Hit Big New Musical Revue 

"THE MERRY GAMBOL" 
Supported by a Company of 70 Comedians. Dancers, Singers and Specialties. 
GAIETY PRICES— 25c to $1.00. 
Matinees. THURSDAY. SATURDAY and BUKPA3T 



Alcazar Theatre 



O'Fnrrell B1 ( near Powell 

Phone LCearni - 
Commencing Monday Night, January 26th, A Complete and Spontaneous 

ANDREW MACK 
America's Foremost [ririi Comedian Supported By 11 is Own Company And 
The ILCAZAR PLAYERS In The Typical Romantic Irish Play 

"THE WAY TO KENMARE" 
Bear Mack Sing Hi< Own Compositions; "The Legend Of The Maguires," 
• Hose, Pweel Rose," '*Dan, My Darling Dan" And "Sweetheart From The 
Emerald Isle." 
Prices— Kight 2Rc to $i : Hat. 25c to 60c, 

-. THURSDAY. SATURDAY. SUNDAY. 



Savoy Theatre 



"The Playhouse Beautiful" 

McAllister St. near Market 

Phone Market ISO 

This Afternoon and Evening Last Times of "ANTONY and CLEOPATRA" 
Starting Sunday. Thi lona! Photo-Drama 

"TRAFFIC IN SOULS" 

Direct from David Belasco's Republic Theatre, N. v. 
All Seats 25c. 1:80, 3:30, 7:30. 9-30. Dancing at 



10 in 80. 



Ethel Clayton, in "The Lion and the Mouse,' 
Theatre next week. 



at the Tivou Columbia Theatre 



Andrew Mack in "Tom Moore" at the Alcazar. 

The Alcazar management, always on the watch for some- 
thing new and of interest to their many patrons, have brought 
the well known Irish actor and singer, Andrew Mack, to their 
cozy theatre for a limited engagement. In his special line of 
work Mack is as good as anybody we have in this country, and 
barring Chauncey Olcott there is really nobody else. Mack has 
his own repertoire of plays, his first offering being a comedy 
written around Tom Moore by Theodore Burt Sayre. The play 
affords Mack every possible opportunity to show himself at 
his best. He can handle the most dramatic situations with as 
much ease as his lightest comedy and love scenes. His brogue 
is a delight to listen to. The play is crowded with witty epi- 
grams and clever sayings, and as Mack utters them they are ren- 
dered crisp and with much unction. Mack can sing, too, and 
this week he is heard in six or eight compositions, a few being 
his own. He possesses a high tenor of good quality, and he 
certainly can put plenty of heart into his singing, particularly 
when he is addressing his lady love. The story is fairly typical 
of its kind, and has to do with English nobility, who of course 
are outwitted at the end, the hero triumphs, and everybody is 
happy except the villain. That Mack scored a big success Mon- 
day night was clearly shown by the great amount of applause 
and a packed house. The Alcazar clearly is in for a big season 
with Mack, and indications point to the biggest business which 
the Alcazar has done for some time. Mack is to give us plays 
which have not been seen in this city before, and this in itself 
is interesting. The Alcazar forces are augmented by several 
good actors whom Mack brought with him. 

I specially liked V. T. Henderson, who in this play enacts the 
role of the bad man. Henderson evinces ability which shows 
him to be an actor of more than common ability, and he played 
a difficult role with considerable ease and grace, and not a 
little finish. Then there is W. J. Townsend, who in a smaller 



Corner Geary and Mason Streets 
Phone Franklin I ■ i 

Tie- Leading Playhouse 
Beginnirg Sun. lay. January 25th and Continuing i..r Two Weeks 

The Musical Triumph 

AD ELE" 

A French Operetta in Three Acts. A <:rein Cast With Twenty-Two Song 
ni*s. Having An Orchestra of Twentj Pi 

Main b— Wednesdays and Saturdays. Special Prices Wednesday Matinees, 

j r >c to $i.".o. 

Bdds Street mar Market, 
Photo-Plays de Luxe 



Tivoli Photo Theatre 



T, .-I Hi v— Last Times of "THE RATTLE OF SHILOH 

our Week, Starting Sunday. A SunerD Filroatization ol 

"THE LION AND THE MOUSE" 
Charles Klein's Most Famous Play. Sis Gripping Parts. 
Continuous, 12 M.. to n P. M.. Daily. Mam s l"c: Evenings 



Orpheum 



O'Farrell Street Bet. Stockton and Powell 
Phone Douglas 7o 

Safest and Most Magnificent Theatre in America 



Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

MARVELOUS VAUDEVILLE 
WALTER LAWRENI B and FRANCES CAMERON in " \ Kit ol Broadway;" 
THE FOUR ORIGINAL PEREZ Equilibrists: "THE DOUBL] CROSS .. 
comedy melodrama by will IRWIN and RALPH RENAUD: pail 
niNi'HAS iii his latest creations Achilles and Patrocles; SMITH and 
COOS 'The Millionaires" assisted bs Marie Brandon: CUMMINGS and 
GLADYTNGS Eccentric Funsters: EDNA SHOWALTER; Last Week 
KEENAN in "Vindication." Retained by Popular I'.man.i MAURICE and 
FLORENCE WALTON World's Most Popular Ball Room Dancers 
Evening prices, 10c, -Be. 50c. 75c. Box seats, $1. Matinee prices 
(except Sundays and holidays). 10c 25e., 50c. 



HOTEL SHATTUCK 

FIREPROOF 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Thirty-five Minutes From San Francisco 

$3.00 per day American Plan $1.50 per day European Plan 



TELEPHONE PROSPECT 1973 

OLITA LUNT YOUNGBERG 

Pupils received for the modern dances. Rag, Tango, 
Hesitation Waltz, Relaxation, Grace Culture. Interpre- 
tation of Song. 

1443 POLK STREET STUDIO 11 

SKETCHES IN VAUDEVILLE FURNISHED 



January 24, 1914. 



and California Advertis 




Mortimer Fleishhacker Party. — Left to right: Mr. Albert 
Rothschild, Mrs. John Rothschild, Mrs. M. Fleishhacker, Mr. 
Mr. Louis Greenbaum, Mrs. Eli Wiel. 

role which allows him an opportunity to show himself as a low 
comedian, and of which he makes the best. Ralph Bell has a 
kind of secondary villain role to perform, and is duly villainous. 
J. Frank Burke in a character role is excellent, and then there is 
Jerome Storm and Edmond Lowe, who do to the best of their 
ability the well known historical characters of Beau Brummell 
and Richard Brinsley Sheridan. Kernan Cripps does the Prince 
of Wales, a role of few opportunities. The settings are all in 
very good taste. In the first act appear six or eight very clever 
children. You will have to secure your seats early, as the rush 
is on. Mack is one of the biggest successes the Alcazar has re- 
corded in its long history. 



ALL TRAFFIC SHOULD CARRY LIGHTS. 

All vehicles, no matter how operated, should carry conspicu- 
ous lights when they are operated after dark. This applies to 
horse drawn wheeled traffic as well as to motor cars, and the 
Automobile Dealers' Association puts the case up to the Board 
of Supervisors with a direct request for the enactment of an or- 
dinance requiring all horse drawn vehicles to show white lights 
front and rear from half an hour after sunset until half an hour 
before sunrise. This is the rule for motor vehicles, and it 
should be made universal for wheeled traffic. 



Schwabacher, Mr. Eli Wiel, E. Desbaillets (ski expert), Mr. John. 
, Robert Cohn, Mr. Mortimer Fleishhacker, Mrs. Louis Greenbaum, 

FIESTA OF THE SNOWS. 

Entertaining Winter Carnival at Truckee Draws Many 
San Franciscans. 

The Truckee "Fiesta of Snow" has already clearly dem- 
onstrated itself to be a sure winner, and at this time, within a 
month from the opening date, seems solidly established in the 
favor of fun-loving Californians — and Nevadans, too, for that 
matter, as many parties from across the line in the Silver State 
have been organized to enjoy the winter sports and the frolics 
in the snows of Truckee's high and invigorating altitude. 

Among the recent parties from San Francisco to trek to 
Truckee was one given by Mr. Mortimer Fleishhacker, and in- 
cluded, besides the host, Mesdames John Rothschild, Morti- 
mer Fleishhacker, Luis Greenbaum, and Eli Wiel, and Messrs. 
Albert Schwabacher, Eli Wiel, Ernest Desbaillets, the ski- ex- 
pert, John Rothschild, Robert Cohn, Mortimer Fleishhacker 
and Luis Greenbaum. 

The party had a splendid time learning the difficult art of 
ski jumping, and returned to San Francisco enthusiastic over 
the opportunitities afforded dwellers of the sunny valleys of 
California to become familiar with all the sports known to 
Switzerland's famous mountain winter resort. Many parties 
are being organized for the next two months by other folks well 
known in local society circles. 



THE NAPA-SAUSALITO HIGHWAY. 

The Napa County Supervisors are planning an issue of bonds 
for $125,000 for roads and bridges. Included in the scheme is 
the expenditure of $60,000 to be used as a cash bonus to the 
State Highway Commission as an inducement for the construc- 
tion of an asphalt and concrete road from Napa to Black Point 
and Sausalito. A map of this section of roadway was printed 
in the News Letter last year, accompanied by an article setting 
forth the advantages of the plan. 



The many friends and patients of Dr. Alfred E. Regens- 

burger, the well known dermatologist, will be glad to know that 
he has returned to the city and resumed practice after some 
months abroad. During his absence he spent considerable time 
in the principal hospitals of Europe, thus adding to his fund 
of knowledge. Dr. Regensburger has made a life study of Skin 
diseases, and his periodical visits to Europe keeps him up to 
date in their treatment. 



At the annual meeting of the Fireman's Fund Insurance 

Company of San Francisco on Wednesday, the resignation of 
Wm. J. Dutton was accepted. He has been connected with the 
company since 1867. Bernard Faymonville, former vice-presi- 
dent, was appointed to succeed Dutton, and J. B. Levinson was 
made vice-president. Dutton is still on the board of directors. 



Pears' 

Soap, like books, 
should be chosen 
with discretion. 
Both are capable of 
infinite harm. 

The selection of 
Pears' is a perfect 
choice and a safe- 
guard against soap 
evils. 

Matrhless t'nr the complexion 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 24, 1914. 





0&ETX 



The other day five women foregathered at a luncheon table 
in the quietest corner of the Palace cafe. The woman with the 
appraising eye at our table said a new futurist style would blaze 
on the landscape any moment, for they were the five foremost 
dressmakers in San Francisco. I interviewed one of them, and 
was assured that the meeting was not arranged for a discussion 
of the new styles and the correlation of modes. Not one of 
them cared a rap at that moment whether the new slinksy taf- 
feta ruffles, in which woman is going her bouffant way, threat- 
:ns to become too common for exotic wear. They were con- 
.-erned in a fr?nk discussion of whether it really pays to carry 
:ertain very rich women on their books. When the rind of 
their conversation is peeled off, it discloses a very large, juicy 
melon — and the modistes were asking themselves "who cut the 
melon?" They decided that they themselves profit very little 
in the melon cutting, but they could come to no agreement 
about concerted action, and the remedy not revealing itself, they 
went their way with several suggestions loosely basted on their 
.■nemorandums. 

"But I know that we will do nothing about it," said the one 
who had called the meeting. "We cannot act individually, 
and I had hoped that we might develop enough courage to take 
some concerted action, but we didn't come through." 

The situation that confronts the dressmakers is this. Every 
one knows that there are women who have so little ready money 
that they are reduced to the expedient of getting ready money 
out of their dressmakers, who pad bills which myopic husbands 
pay without much protest, and the dressmaker then divides 
the padding with the wife. It sounds like a good thing for the 
dressmaker, but there is really nothing sound about it. "Take 
the case of Mrs. Blank," said one dressmaker, mentioning the 
name of the wife of a multi-millionaire whose only daughter is 
likewise married to a millionaire; "for years her husband gave 
her so little ready money that she was reduced to this way of 
getting it. I carried her on my books, and the other day I had 
the bookkeeper go over the accounts and figure out whether I 
had made fair interest on the ready money that I had advanced. 
The tally showed that it was a losing proposition for me. Her 
husband paid her bills once a year, and during the year she 
drew large sums of ready money from me which I had to tack 
on to her legitimate bills and wait a whole year for payment. 
Then this particular customer evidently made some other ar- 
rangement, and stopped patronizing me, and gave as an excuse 
that I was too high-priced, 'really exorbitant, you know.' A cus- 
tomer who will do this sort of thing is never loyal, anyway, and 
when she gets through using you, she always puts a dent in 
your reputation if she can. All the first-class dressmakers 
know the women who make a practice of doing this sort of thing 
and I wanted them to agree to stop it for the good of the trade. 
But we couldn't agree, and of course if the rest of them are go- 
ing to stand in on the thing, I can't hold out against this sort of 
graft, which, contrary to general opinion, is a one-sided graft, 
and the dressmaker does not reside on the right side of it." 

© © © 

While we are wandering around with dressmakers, it is in- 
teresting to note that the posteresque mode of the day accents 
accessories as never before. One does not attain distinction 
by dress alone. Shoes, hairpins, hatpins, all the one-time in- 
cidentals, have become the significant items in the wardrobes. 
In the younger set a number of the girls are wearing the satin 
ballet slippers without heels for dancing, or the satin pumps 
with the merest excuse for a heel. The slinksy glide of the day, 
which looks more like a comic silhouette of a crawl than a walk, 
can best be accomplished in these shoes. Enid Gregg, who is 
really a wonderful dancer, was the first girl here to wear the 
ballet pumps to a dance, and others have followed her example. 
Over in Berkeley, at the college dances the majority of the girls' 
are wearing them. They are designed for dancing and refuse 



to look pretty when the foot is in repose, so those who have any 
vanity about displaying an attractive foot are not very keen 
about them, and the older matrons have not responded to this 
fad. The new posteresque way of doing the hair requires two 
enormous pins to hold the knot at just the angle which will 
make the hair seem most remotely connected with the head of 
the wearer. Mrs. Templeton Crocker brought back with her 
from Europe the handsomest pin's that have been seen in these 
parts. They are wonderful carved white ivory affairs, huge 
round things, yet so delicately wrought that they give the effect 
of lightness and grace. As specimens of carving in ivory, they 
are worthy of a place in a collector's cabinet. Fortunately for 
the multitudes they are not consigned to the privacy of a cabi- 
net, but have a very conspicuous place on the well shaped head 
of Mrs. Crocker. 

Mrs. Fred McNear is another stunning young matron who is 
getting all the fun out of the new modes, and is in return 
giving some. She out-knobs Mrs. Crocker's way of doing the 
hair, and wears two stunning pins at just the angle demanded 
by the most fascinating violation of the Japanese influence. 
© © © 

Rumor, which of late has not gone awry in her predictions, is 
very busy just now producing all the evidence to prove that Miss 
Marion Newhall has an engagement announcement which she 
is getting ready to share with her friends. Tradition in the 
Newhall family demands that engagements shall be consum- 
mated in a certain corner of the drawing room in which is lo- 
cated the so-called "popping" chair. The two other girls in 
the family happened to be sitting there when their favored sui- 
tors declared themselves, and it was understood that their 
youngest sister would manage to use the same beloved prop 
in the staging of a family romance. But I am told that this 
engagement, if engagement it is, is not the indoor variety, and 
therefore there should be no hard feeling against this sister for 
ignoring family tradition. The romance is said to have reached 
the climax of engagement on a recent motor trip which the 
young lady took with the Templeton Crockers. 
© © © 

Mrs. Fred Kohl is still going about with a cane and foregoing 
all the pleasure of the dance, but she is very active in other 
ways, finding a great deal of time for music and generous atten- 
tions to fellow musicians who are less blessed with wealth than 
she. Likewise she has been doing a great deal of entertaining 
in a more or less informal way with plans under way for several 
formal dinner parties, beginning with one in honor of Mr. and 
Mrs. William Delaware Neilson. Mrs. Neilson is very proud of 
her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Felton Elkins, and is herself arrang- 
ing a series of informal affairs in her honor, beginning with the 
tea at which Mrs. Elkins and her young sister, who will spend 
the winter with her were introduced to all the old friends of the 
family. Young Elkins and his bride will spend the spring in 
Santa Barbara. 

© © © 

The Cinderella ball which illumines the prospects of next 
week, will be a very complete demonstration of how success- 
fully the new dances have been mastered by those who can no 
longer hang on to the fringe of the younger set. The Cinder- 
ellas are not only the married but the married for some timers, 
and as it is a lovely family party of about five hundred, every 
one who has made a stagger at the dances will essay the steps. 
There are dinner parties galore scheduled before the dance. The 
Charlie Clarks have sent out cards for a dinner at the Fairmont, 
and as their affairs are always elaborate and full of surprises in 
the way of decorations, their guests are already enjoying the 
thing in prospect. Mr. and Mrs. James Otis are likewise down 
as dinner hosts, and the Frank Andersons have also sent out 
cards asking friends to dine with them before the ball. The 
Christian de Guignes will make the Felton Elkins the motif 
of their dinner party. Miss Elizabeth Brice and Miss Louise 
Boyd will be joint hostesses at a dinner for the younger set. 
Other groups of friends are planning to dine together before 
going to the ball, which means of course that it will be very late 
in starting, and trip down the morning hours. 
© © © 

Dr. Harry Tevis is the ideal sort of bachelor which no com- 
munity can afford to be without. He has long since been given 
up by the matchmakers as a blank cartridge in the matrimonial 



January 24, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



locker, and when they stopped wasting ammunition on him he 
came out from his hiding place and filled a very necessary place 
in the social life of the city, distributing his favors and his en- 
tertainments with the unerring hand of the master of the art. He 
has given a dinner and theatre party every night during the 
Pavlowa engagement, and the Tevis box is much lorgnetted. 
The Friday following the Cinderella dance, Dr. Tevis will give 
a dance at the Palace in honor of Miss Saidie Murray and her 
fiance, Lieutenant Conger Pratt. Only thirty guests have been 
bidden to this affair, which means that delightful informality 
will rule, and affair will be a genuine frolic. 



CHANCE REMARK IS MEATY. 

During Luncheon to Prominent Eastern Power Man Remark 
Is Made that San Franciscans Will Do Well to Consider. 

During the course of a few casual remarks at the luncheon 
tendered to him by Mr. John Britton, General Manager and 
Vice-President of the Pacific Gas & Electric Company of San 
Francisco, reference was made by Mr. Charles L. Edgar, head 
of the Boston Electric Company, to the subject of the method of 
testing the sentiment of the public on matters connected with 
public ownership of public utilities. The remark had nothing 
to do with the luncheon, but because it was made in so casual 
a manner, it perhaps went home deeper with those who listened 
to it. 

Referring to the fact that too often the American people are 
apt to be the victims of a moment's sentimental enthusiasm, and 
in consequence apt to act without quiet and deliberate con- 
sideration, to regret, possibly, when it is too late, Mr. Edgar 
pointed out that, in the State of Massachusetts, the law required 
that on all questions dealing with municipal ownership the peo- 
ple should be required to vote two years in succession. In other 
words, the first vote being recorded, the second one was for the 
purpose of affirming the action in the first instance. In this 
way, if the people, roused by the enthusiasm of the moment and 
the spell cast upon them by the advocates of public ownership 
or those opposed, should register their opinions and afterward 
regret their action, they would have the opportunity of repairing 
the damage to their consciences a year later. Such is the char- 
acter of the American people that such a law with reference to 
matters of such importance as that of municipal ownership 
would be to the best interests of the whole people. 

The luncheon to Mr. Edgar was given in the Bohemian Club, 
and was attended by the different department heads and offi- 
cials of the local power company. Mr. Britton, who is first 
vice-president of the National Electric and Light Association, 
is mentioned as the next head of that organization. The elec- 
tion which would place him in that position takes place this 
year so that, in the event of his being elected, as is taken for 
granted, the convention which takes place here in 1915, would 
have the distinction of having at its head a San Franciscan. Mr. 
Edgar is high in the counicls of the national body, and a close 
and intimate friend of Mr. Britton, having entertained him in 
Boston on several occasions; the luncheon here was more in 
the form of a return of courtesy than of any important business 
significance. 



One of Breuer's big canvases can be framed by E. B. 

Courvoisier as expeditiously and as satisfactorily as a little 
Copley print, or a monotype by Xavier Martinez. A wide and 
exclusive collection of framing materials. 431 Sutter street. 

( Aflrertijwment) 




Mater any BteSBgHusc off IPfflnsfe-sa IFr®clks 



Rfetaas AUSc 
Scottish Rite Temple, Van Ness and Sutter 
Just Opened Telephone Prospect I 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

A delightful contribution to the charm of life in 
cosmopolitan San Francisco. 

M. MAURICE AND FLORENCE WALTON 

The'world's greatest rhythmic dancers 

In the Rose Room, Herter's sensuously beautiful 
decorative achievement, during supper 

EVERY EVENING 

Under the Management of James Woods 



RESERVE YOUR TABLES FOR THE 

"THES DANSANTS" 

ON SATURDAY AFTERNOONS 
FROM 4 TO 7 

IN THE 

PALACE HOTEL COURT 



HOTEL OAKLAND S2» 

460 Rooms with Outside Exposure (No Court Rooms) 
RATES: Rooms, detached bath $1.50 per day and up 
Rooms, private bath $2.00 per day and up 
EUROPEAN PLAN 

Advantageous Rates to Permanent Guests 

Noted for Cuisine and Service Restaurant Prices Moderate 

Home Atmosphere and Genuine Hospitality 

VICTOR REITER, Manager 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

125 miles south from San Francisco. 
Finest all grass Golf Course in Califor- 
nia. Daily rates, $5, $6, $7 per day. 
Special monthly rates. 

PACIFIC GROVE HOTEL 

Three miles by trolley from DEL 
MONTE, under same management. 
Daily rates $2.50 to $4 per day. 
Special monthly rates. 



Above hotels are under the management of 

H. R. WARNER, Del Monte, California 





^■^ 


CLEARANCE SALE 




fft 1 


DURING JANUARY 




f 


CHINESE CURIOS 




APPLIED ART WORK 




V 


MISS CLAYES 

401-404 Liebes Building, 177 Post St . near Grant Avciue 







Mrs. Marie Read Miss Josephine K. Fischer 

"llr (Sift anil Jfauonr §>lin»" 

Applied Art Needle Work Hand Painted China 

Occasion Cards, Card Prizes and other 

Artistic Novelties 

BA31 uitUs2Sa> 

STREET AT GRANT AVE 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 24, 1914. 








Announcements suitable for this Department are, desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear In the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 




ENGAGEMENTS. 

GOLDSTEIN-OFFENBACH. — Mr. and Mrs. M. Goldstein, of Marysville. 
announce the engagement of their daughter. Miss Esther Goldstein, 
to Moses Offenbach of this city. 

HARRISON-PRIMES. — Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Gordon announce the en- 
gagement of their niece. Miss Maebelle E. Harrison, to Joseph H. 
Primes. 

HARSHER-KAUFFMAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Harscher announce the 
engagement of their daughter Adele to Mr. Mark KaufCman of Sacra- 
mento. 

KATZ-WISE. — Mr. and Mrs. J. Katz, of Washington street, announce the 
engagement of their youngest daughter. Bertha A. Katz, to Mr. 
Nathan Wise, of Portland, Ore. 

MA I HSON-HAAS.— Theengagement of Miss Corinne Madison, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. James Madison of San Francisco, to Reuben C. Haas, 
confectioner, was announced in Fresno on Friday. 

ST. JOHN-TERRY. — At a tea given Tuesday afternoon at her home in 
Buena Vista avenue, Miss Geraldine St. John formally announced her 
engagement to Marion Terry of Los Angeles. 

SUITS-AUSTIN.— Mr. and Mis. J. H. Suits, of Taylor street, announce 
the engagement of their daughter, Gladys Cecil, to James Clifford Aus- 
tin. 

VALENTINE- STARKE. — From New York comes news of the engagement 
of Miss Eloise Valentine, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Valentine, to 
Bruce Stark, of Virginia. 

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

BUELL-POE. — Mr. James Jorgensen announces the marriage of his niece, 
Mrs. Myrtle Buell of Exeter, to Edgar Allen Poe. 

T1AXXIGAN-HOOPER. — The wedding of Miss Josephine Hannigan and 
Arthur Hooper will take place Tuesday evening, January 27th, at the 
apartments of Mr. and Mrs. M. P. Hannigan in the Kellogg. 

DE SABLA-PAYNE. — The next wedding of social prominence will be on 
February 3d, when Miss Vera de Sabla and Mr. Herbert Payne pledge 
their vows. The ceremony will take place at the Eugene de Sabla 
home at El Cerrito. Miss Amy Brewer, the particular chum of Miss 
de Sabla, will be here from Chicago to be the latter's principal at- 
tendant. 

DE YOUNG-THERIOT. — Miss Kathleen de Young and Mr. Ferdinand 
Thcriot will have a very simple wedding at the M. H. de Young home 
in California street. This is to be on the 28th. Archbishop Patrick 
Riordan, assisted by several of the clergy of the Cathedral parish, to 
which the de Young family has always belonged, will solemnize the 
iltes. Miss Phyllis de Young will accompany her pretty sister to 
the altar. 

WEDDINGS. 

BASCH-KAHN. — At the home of the bride's sister, Mr. and Mrs. Ben 
Barbash, Miss Essae Basch and Mr. Leo Kahn were married by Dr. 
Jacob Nieto, New Year's night. 

BLANK-HOLMES. — Mrs. Mabel Blank and William Holmes were married 
Thursday evening last at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. John Mc- 
Gilvray, the Rev. C. S. Dutton of the First TTnitarian Cchurch offi- 
ciating. The couple are honeymooning in Southern California. 

HINZ-WALSH. — Miss Gertrude Hinz and Frank Walsh were married 
recently by Father CTNeill of Oakland. The ceremony was performed 
at the home of the bride's mother. Mrs. A. C. Hinz, in Mill Valley. 

SARTHOU-VOX DER LEITH.— Miss Eva Sarthou became the wife of 
Dr. Harold von der Leith last week at the home of Mr. and Mrs. H. G. 
Peters on Green street. The bride is a daughter of one of California's 
old French families. Her husband is a clever young German. 

TEAS. 

UAI'WALADER. — Mrs. Russell J. Wilson was the guest of honor at a 
bridge tea last Friday, when her daughter, Mrs. George L. Cadwalader, 
entertained a few friends at her attractive new home in Jackson street. 

DEANE. — Miss Dorothy Deane entertained at an informal tea Sunday af- 
ternoon at her home in Vallejo street. The entertainment was in 
honor of the officers of the U. S. steamer California. 

HELLMAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Horace Hellman gave a charming 5 o'clock 
tea Sunday of last week for Lord and Lady Balfour. 

HINES. — A bridge tea was given by Mrs. Charles Hines at Fort Scott 
on Friday in lienor of Mrs. Frank Hines of Salt Lake, who is her 
house guest. 

McDOWELL. — Miss Nellie McDowell, daughter of the late General Mc- 
Dowell, U. S. A., for many years the commandant at the Presidio, 
was guest of honor at a tea which Miss Elizabeth Ashe gave at the 
Telegraph Hill Settlement House on Friday afternoon last week. 

MOORE. — Mrs. Pierre Moore, was a charming hostess recently at a tea 
which she gave at her home in Presidio avenue in honor of Mrs. Walter 
Filer. 

SULLIVAN. — Mrs. Harry Sullivan will entertain at a bridge tea this af- 
ternoon at her home in Washington street, for about fifty gutst?. 

WALLACH. — Miss Amy Morrison was the complimented guest Thursday 
afternoon last week at an informal tea given by Misa Louise Wallach 
at her apartments at the Gables. 



LUNCHEONS. 

BLANDING. — Mrs. Gordon Blanding entertained some friends Tuesday at 
a luncheon at the Fairmont. 

COWDEN. — Miss Ruth Zeile and Miss Beatrice Nickel were the very 
good reasons for Mrs. John Cheever Cowdin's debutante luncheon 
given at the Francisca Club on Wednesday of last week. 

COLEMAN. — Miss Ruth Zeile was the honored guest last Thursday after- 
noon at a luncheon given by Miss Janet Coleman at her home in 
California street. After luncheon Miss Coleman entertained her guests 
at Kathleen Parlow's 'violin recital. 

D1MOND. — Wednesday, Mrs. Edward Dimond gave a luncheon, with 
bridge afterwards at her home in Pacific avenue. 

FORD. — Miss Vera de Sabla, one of the attractive brides of the near 
future, was the guest of honor at a luncheon at Burlingame on 
Thursday of last week, given by Mrs. Bernard Ford. 

HENSHAW. — Mrs. William G. Henshaw gave a large luncheon Thursday 
at the St. Francis Hotel in honor of Mrs. Henry Brevort of Paris. 

HOPKINS. — Mrs. Samuel L. Hopkins was the guest of honor at a bridge 
luncheon given by her cousin. Miss Hattie Schulz. Thursday, January 
22d. 

PERSHING. — General and Mrs. John J. Pershing, who are guests at the 
Stewart Hotel during their stay in San Francisco, entertained in- 
formally at luncheon there on Thursday afternoon of last week in 
honor of Mrs. Pershing's father, U. S. Senator Warren of Wyoming. 

PETERS. — Miss Anne Peters entertained at a luncheon party Monday at 
the Fairmont. 

ROBERTSON. — Miss Sadie Murray was the motif for a luncheon Thursday 
given by Miss Margaret Robertson at the latter's home In Greenwich 
Terrace. 

SUTTON. — Miss Martha Sutton made Miss Gwladys Bowen the motif for 
a luncheon to a number of the debutante set this week. 

DINNERS. 

BROWNE. — Captain Lawrence Browne was host Monday evening at his 
bachelor quarters at Fort Scott. 

HARRISON. — Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Harrison, members of the Denver 
smart set, who are spending part of the winter in this city, enter- 
tained at a prettily appointed dinner at the Palace Hotel on Monday 
evening. 

HARRISON-SMITH. — Mrs. Harrison-Smith was hostess at an informal 
dinner party Thursday evening at her home in Clay street. 

HEUTER. — Dr. and Mrs. Edwin Shorb will be the complimented guests at 
a dinner given by Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Heuter this Saturday evening 
in their apartments at the Regina. 

MORRISON. — Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Morrison of Denver entertained at 
dinner for the Misses Morrison of San Jose on Tuesday. 

MOONEY. — Mr. and Mrs. Squire Varick Mooney gave a dinner Friday 
evening at their home in Broadway. 

ROSENWEIG. — The Baroness de Rosenweig was hostess at a beautifully 
appointed dinner at the Palace this week in honor of the attractive 
nieces of the Baroness, the lovely Nieto girls. The table was un- 
usually artistic with masses of pink carnations and the popular rose 
tree effect. The following guests shared the pleasures of the evening: 
Misses A. Foute. Helen Wright, Gertrude O'Brien, Helen Jones, Marlon 
Nfewhall, De Pue, and Rose and Josephine Nieto. Mesdames I. de 
Viosca, Percy Moore. Messrs. Lansing Tevis. Kenneth Moore, Arthur 
Paget, Fred Tillman, Reginald Paget, Pachel, Fentris Hill, Will Tevis, 
L. Pickering. D'Arcy von Bockelen, Clinton Jones, Walter von 
Bockelen. 

SPRECKELS. — Mr. and Mrs. Claus Spreckels were host and hostess during 
last week at a dinner at Hotel del Coronado, complimentary to Miss 
Josephine Smith ami Lieutenant-Commander F. Freeman, whose wed- 
ding will take place on the 21st. 

STONE. — Mr. and Mrs. Egbert Stone entertained at an informal dinner at 
the Cliff House Thursday evening. 



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FERD. T. HOPKINS. Prop'r. >7 Great Jonea St.. New York City. 




January 24, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



IS 



SUPPERS. 

SHARON. Dr. Han was host last evening ;it a theatr* 

which was followed by a supper given by Mr. and Mrs. Frederick w. 
m at the 1 'alace i lotel, 

RECEPTIONS. 

MADDERN Miss Merle Maddern, leading lady with "Kismet," was 
i of honor al b big re< eptlon al the California Club Tuesday after 
noon 

wkavkk. Mrs. William Gate wood, a recenl bride, was the complimented 
guest al hi elaborate reception given bj her aunt, Mrs, Chester Wea- 
ver, last Fridaj afternoon al hjei residence in Jackson street. 

MOTORING. 

DB PUE. — Mr. and Mrs. Edgar de Pue and the Misses Elva and Corennah 
de Pue will leave thi6 week for a moi.tr trip to the southern part of 
the State. 

ART EXHIBIT. 

BURNETTE-- Miss Mabeile Lee Burnette of 2403 Telegraph avenue was 
hostess at an exhibit of art in photography, January 18th. Profes- 
sional musicians and singers entertained the guests of two hundred 
admiring friends, and four young matrons poured ten. 

THEATRE PARTIES. 

KEITH. — John Keith entertained a box party at the Pavlowa performance 
Tuesday evening; after which he entertained his guests at supper at 
The St. Francis. 

MILLER. — Mrs. C. O. G. Miller was hostess at a theatre party Tuesday 
evening in honor of Miss Marie Louise Black. 

DANCES. 

DRUM.— Mr. and Mrs. John S. Drum were host and hostess at a dance to 
the younger set on last Friday evening, entertaining informally for 
Miss Marie Louise Black, who takes her departure for New York 
this week. 

KILMER. — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Ililmer entertained a number of pretty 
belles and their cavaliers at a dance hist week at their new home in 
Jordan Terrace, in honor of their daughter, Miss Vivian Hilmer. 

McBRYDE. — Mr. and Mrs Douglas McBride have chosen Saturday of this 
week for the dance whl .1 they are giving in honor of Lieutenant ami 
Mrs. Emery Smith. 

PERKINS. — 'The Sorosis Club was the scene on Friday evening of ;i dance 

for the sub-debutante set. .it Which Miss Ruth Perkins was hostess in 
compliment to Miss Marie Hathaway. 

SCOTT. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry 'I 1 . Scott were host and hostess at an in- 
formal dame at nurliugauie this week. 

WRILL— Mr, Raphael Weill will he the host at a dancing party this 
Saturday evening at the Fairmont, i lie event celebrating ids anni- 
versary. 

DANSANTS. 

MoTEL I'Ki'iu- a "soiree dansant" was ejven Thursday evening at the 
Hotel Cecil. A number of society people who are domiciled there 
entertained dinner gnosis and attended the dance afterward. 

MORRISON. — The Misses Morrison ■■■■ ■ ■ ea ;ii the Army ami Navy 

Relief Society dansant at the si. Francis this week, 

SMITH. — Lieutenant ami Mis. Kim iy Smith, who have JuSl arrived her 

on their honeyn 1 [rom Manila, were the c pllmented guests last 

Sa 1 urday afteri n al a delightful tea-dance given by 1 

mother, Mrs. Wm, 11. Smith. ;.t tin' California Club Hall. 

ST. FRANCIS. — Another series ol soiree dans tan ta was Inaugurated Fri- 
day evening last at the Motel St. Francl 

WAKEFIELD. — Dr. and Mrs. Francis Wakefield were hosl and ho 

a formal dance lasl Mondaj evening at their home in Sutter street 

AT THE HOTELS. 

HOTEL DEL MONTE. Thi annual inland Em] curslon 11 

Del Monte Sat o rda > afternoon. There were about ■ hundred ami 

sei 1 lit > mi mhcis in the farty. They remained until Sundaj 
noon, -Despite the rain ' ij night. Quite a number of 

from the Presidio, with their ladies, took dinner at the Hotel and re- 
mained tor the dam. that evening, Mr. ami Mrs. Stanley Fletcher of 
London are al Del Monte foi the week, fix tensive Improvements arc 
under was on the Del Mem. goll link, which at the present time was 
never in better condition, a tournament has been arranged for Feb- 
ruary 21st and S3d. Many beautiful trophies will >r both 
men ami women for the various events as scheduled. -Three la: 

cursl ta Northwest havi Lt Del Monte 

during tin the excursions were From Vt 

Canada, The majority of the members are tlrst visitors to California, 

PACIFIC OROV1 NOTES. Mis Ward vi lOd Mis. I' 

ton ot MoMinnevUle, Ore., ai d here for an Indefinite 

1;, MacBtvatn and win. ot Portland, ore, Mr. and Mrs F. YV. 1 

JackSOnvl N CblOUpek and Wife of Oakland 

the week's bridal couples at the Hotel red the 

Itll, i: I I -\ ins of San Jose. W. II. 

Rice 01 Bah id T. 11. n 

\v. Burgess, Superintendent ol the Odd Fellows Homo at Los <;utos 

lias returned i" the hotel for a prolonged stay, and wit: be Joined in 

a fortnight by his wife and daughter.— Mrs. Grai 

class every Saturday afternoon at the H 

much attracted by the 
■ ' 



ARRIVALS. 

ey, U. S. A., and Miss ikn 

i: ■"'■■■ ■ ■'■ ho litI .i from 3eattle last Friday, are the gu< 

1 1' nrj 1.. Dodge and Mrs, Ji ■■ 1 , 

BREVi |,;|; ■ >hii ■ 

KOSHLAND Mi. .01,1 Mrs, Max Koshiand are at the Palace Hotel for 

Hie remainder ol the ■-■ 
McNEAR, Mr. and Mrs, Seward McNear, who spenl two weeh at Hotel 

,l '' 1 Ctoroni have returnei me aftei e di llghtful ■ 

southern 1 esort. 
NICHOLS. Mlsa Peggy Nichols, who has he,.,, In tin Sa I a ■ la 1 

summei has returned to San Fran, [sco with Mrs, James 1 lunnlngham 

and the Misses s.ua ami Elizabeth Cunningham. 
RTJCKMAN.- Colonel and Mis. Ruckman and Misa Marjorle Ruckmi re 

greeting their San Francisco friends since their return from thi Phil 

■ I I' S laSi Week, 

SHEEX.INB.— Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Sheellne returned 1 

berla recently from Honolulu, where they have spent the past three 

months. 
WINSTON. — Miss Charlotte Winston, of Loa Angeles is the guest of her 

cousins, Lieutenant Irving Mali Mayfteld, U. S. N., am Mrs. Mayfleld, 

at Mare Island. 

DEPARTURES. 
DERNHAM.— Mr. and Mrs. Henry Dernham. who have maintained per- 
manent apartments at the St. Francis Motel since their return h 

around the world, left on last Wednesday for Southern California. 
DUNCAN.— Mr. and Mrs. William Duncan are en route to the Bast to 

Spend a month with Mr. Duncan's relatives. 
EVANS.— Mr. Evan Evans departed last Saturday on the Overland for 

New i'ork, en route to England. 
GASSNER. — Mrs. Louis Gassner left recently for an extended visit in the 

East. 
HAMMON.— Mr. and Mrs. Wendell P. Hammon left Thursday for an 

Eastern trip. They will be gone two months. 
HECHT.-Mi. and Mrs. Joel Hecht left Monday for the East and Europe, 

to he away until midsummer. 
KING. — Miss Genevieve King left last week for the East, to be gone for 

three or four months. 
KI.AMP. — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Klamn of Honolulu, and their sister. 

Miss Louise Girard, left for Houston, Texas, the last of this week. 
LA SALLE.— Misses Ida and Casta La Salle, daughters of Mrs. Raniona 

La Salle, of Fresno, have returned homo after visiting their sister, 

Mrs. C. L. Wiggins. 
McNEAR, — Miss Ernestine McNear left Sunday for St. Louis to be the 

maid of honor at the wedding of Miss Marion Turner and Lambert 

Wooster. 
PICKERING. — Miss Riioda Pickering left for Tucson, Arizona, last week. 
VON SCHDOERKR.— Miss -lanet von Schroeder and Heintich von Schroe- 

der, who spent part of the month as guests of Mrs. Eleanor Martin, 

have returned to San Luis Obispo. 

INTIMATIONS. 

BAILEY. — General Charles Bailey, U. S. A., Mrs. Bailey and Miss Omira 
Bailey are here from Seattle, visiting Mrs. Henry L. Dodge. 

CAROLAN. — Mr, and Mrs. Francis Carolan's 'chateau at Burlingame will 
lie started in the early spring, and it will be almost a year before 
compli 1 c.i 

CINDERELLA PALL.— The Cinderella Pal! will take place Friday even- 
ing. January 30th, at the Fairmont I lotel. 

DE GU1GNE Mr. and Mis. Christian de Guigne, Jr., will entertain at an 

elaborate dinner a1 the Fairmont ^11 the evening of January 30th, he- 

fore the Cinderella ball, Mr. and Mrs. Felton Elktns heing the motifs. 

will leave February 10th for New Fork, en route to Europe. 
DE SABLA. Mr. and Mrs. Eugene de Sabla and Miss Leontinc de Sabla 
FoLGKK. Mr ami Mis. Ernesl Folgei 1 their two children will leave 

roi an • iriental trip this month, 
GALLOIS. Mr, and Mrs. John Galloia left New York Thursday last on the 

Lusltania for London, to visit the latter's brother. John McMulIln. 
1.1. Mr. and Mrs. Mark L. Gcrstle will return to this city this 

Week. 

HALE. Mr. and Mrs. Prentiss Cobb Hali tre expected home the first 
week m February fro,,, \< w Fork. 

JOHNSON.— Mr. and Mrs. Hiram Johnson. Jr.. are the guests Of Hie [at 

tfr, a thi Mrs. Philip E. Bowles at "The Pines," the 
, in to-' Piedmont hills. 
MORRISON.— The Misses Morrison ol San Jose have been p : <* s ing some 

ID MW II al I lie ! ':i 

MOORE, Mr. and Mrs. A. A. MOOre, Jr., have just completed a villa iii 

Piedmont Hills that commands a beautiful view of tic 
NICKELSBERG.— Miss Florence Nlckelsberg is expecting to take an ex- 
tended trip East in the near future. 
SHKKYK Miss Rebecca Shrove came up from San Mateo, and was in 

town for two or three .lays at the e •'' ■''■ Miss Gertrude O'Brien. 

TJMBSEN. -Mr- and Mrs. Harry I'mhsen and the latter's sister. Miss Mol- 

I .mi. left the Umbsen home in California street last week, 
and took temporary apartments at the St Benedict, on Pine str& 
WINSHIP. — All records for costly entertainment in the social htsl 

Macon, Ga., were broken in the ball given last week in the Hotel 
psey by Mr. and Mrs. Emory Winshlp of San Frnneisco in honor 
Miss Margaret Casey. It represented Miss 
■ traduction to society. 

Dr. Clyde Payne and Dr. Eugene Payne, Dentists, have resumed 

practice at 146 Grant avenue. Telephone Kearny 66. Hours: 9 to 4. 



,, 1 n scJh JIB Pbetan Building. San Francisco, relieves 

9 worn only temporarily. 



le 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 24, 1914. 



ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Gaiety. — The third, and undoubtedly the most im- 
portant of the Gaiety productions, will be presented to 
expectant San Franciscans on Monday night. On this 
auspicious occasion, the curtain will ring up disclosing 
the manifold secrets and surprises that Marie Dressier 
has herself prepared for the delight of local enthusi- 
asts in her new and vastly entertaining musical revue, 
appropriately titled "The Merry Gambol." It is said 
that this production will far surpass in every detail its 
predecessors of Mr. Anderson's popular playhouse. 

The book is by Addison Burkhardt; lyrics by Arthur 
A. Penn, who is the versatile press representative of the 
Gaiety ; while the music is by Russell M. Tarbox, who 
has written a score that for freshness, life and tuneful- 
ness is said by those who have heard it at rehearsals to 
be unequaled by any music heard recently in produc- 
tions of this particular character. Frank Pallma is the 
musical director of the new show, and his return to 
the Gaiety is jeing hailed with gladness on all sides. 

Miss Dressier, who has a wonderful part in ''The 
Merry Gambol," and who promises some sensational 
things in the way of Parisian daringness, as applied to 
costumes, has personally superintended the rehearsals 
of her new vehicle. Among her support will be Chas. 
Judels, Gene Luneska, Charles Purcell, Alf. Goulding, 
Gladys Goulding, Chas. A. Mason, Ogden Wight, Frank 
Hayes, and the Marvelous Millers. 

Alcazar. — Andrew Mack will make the second pro- 
duction of his brief season at the Alcazar on Monday 
night, when he will produce for the first time in San 
Francisco his charming and delightful Irish comedy 
drama, "The Way to Kenmare," written especially for 
him by Edward E. Rose, the well-known American 
playwright. When this play was produced by Mack in 
Australia a few years ago, it created a veritable sensa- 
tion, not so much so on account of any startling fea- 
tures it unfolded, but because of its quaint, quiet, de- 
lightful humor and the sweet, simple story that it tells. 
The leading role of Dan Maguire becomes a portrait 
of the brightest hues in the hands of the brilliant Mack. 
He bubbles over with mirth, a jest in every turn of 
phrase, and roguish laughter always in his eye. Bright 
sayings are always on his lips, and they tumble off 
with unstudied effect. He is manly, jovial, fun-loving, 
with a captivating manner, and he stirs the audience to 
a pitch of interest in every move he makes on the stage. 
In other words, he is the true type of Irishman to his 
finger tips. The cast is a long one, and affords excel- 
lent acting opportunities for charming Louise Hamil- 
ton, Annie Mack Berlein, and the balance of the clever Alca- 
zarans. Scenically, the production will be a sumptuous and ac- 
curate one, the scenes of the play allowing the artist untold 

possibilities. 

» * * 

Kohler & Chase Hall. — The soloist at the regular weekly 
Matinee of Music which will be given under the auspices of 
Kohler & Chase this Saturday afternoon, January 24th, will be 
Mrs. Irene Kelly Williams, lyric soprano. Mrs. Williams' voice 
is not only of more than ordinary material, but it is used with 
that finer artistic discrimination which is necessary for the suc- 
cess of a vocal artist. The program will be in the nature of an 
operatic affair, but will give Mrs. Williams also an opportunity 
to show her efficiency as a ballad singer. This artist is well 
known in musical circles inasmuch as her services are fre- 
quently employed by prominent musical clubs, as well as those 
of the social organizations which have added music as one of 
their regular functions. On this occasion Mrs. Williams will 
sing the Ballatella from "Pagliacci." There will be an unusu- 
ally interesting instrumental part, which will be rendered on the 
Knabe Player Piano and on the Pipe Organ. 
» « * 

Tivoli. — No more popular American play was ever written 
than "The Lion and the Mouse," Charles Klein's greatest suc- 
cess, and it will be presented in film form for the first time at 
the Tivoli for the week commencing Sunday. The story is 
gripping in its interest, and is built around John Burkett Ryder, 




Marie Dressier, who opens this Monday night at the Gaiety in 
her wonderful new musical revue, "The Merry Gambol." 

a money king who has compassed the financial ruin and profes- 
sional disgrace of Judge Rossmore, of the Supreme Court. Shir- 
ley Rossmore, the judge's daughter, and young Jefferson Ryder, 
returning from Europe on the same boat, take a deep interest 
in each other. How the "mouse" finally wins the "lion's" ad- 
miration, and clears her father, is cleverly told. A Keystone 
comedy will lend diversity to the bill, and "The Battle of Shi- 

loh" will be shown for the last times to-day. 

* * » 

Orpheum. — The Orpheum bill for next week will contain six 
entirely new acts. Those famous musical comedy stars, Walter 
Lawrence and Frances Cameron, will appear in an elaborate 
singing and dancing skit called "A Bit of Broadway." 

The Four Original Perez, the most wonderful equilibrists 
that ever visited this country will exhibit their skill on free 
bounding ladders. 

"The Double Cross," a comedy melodrama by Will Irwin and 
Ralph E. Renaud, will be presented with a thoroughly efficient 
cast. Both dramatists are San Franciscans. 

Paul Conchas will perform seemingly impossible feats of 
strength in his intermezzo "Achilles and Patrocles." 

James Hughes Smith and Jim Cook, assisted by Marie Bran- 
don, will present an entertaining act of song, dance and comedy. 

Roy Cummings and Helen Gladyings, Eccentric Funsters, will 
amuse with a thoroughly original act. 

Next week will be the last of Edna Showalter, and Frank 
Keenan. In compliance with popular demand, Maurice and 
Florence Walton will be retained another week. 



January 24, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



Savoy. — The wonderful white slave production, "Traffic in 
Souls," will begin a limited engagement at the Savoy Theatre 
on Sunday, and will be shown daily at the hours of 1:30, 3:30, 
7 :30 and 9 :30. This photo-drama in six parts has created a 
veritable sensation in New York, where it has been showing 
not only at David Belasco's Republic Theatre, but also at five 
other prominent playhouses for the last two months. The play 
shows the actual workings of the vice trust and the "system," 
but in the whole treatment of the subject there is not one sug- 
gestive or obscene scene in the entire 6,000 feet of film. As an 
additional attraction at the Savoy Theatre, Manager E. Fleet 
Bostwick has decided to have a dance on the stage every after- 
noon at half-past five and evening at half-past ten, when all 
the patrons will be invited to enjoy themselves. The last per- 
formance of "Antony and Cleopatra" will be given this after- 
noon and evening. 



Fritz Kreisler Coming. — An event in San Francisco's 1913- 
1914 musical season will be the appearances of Fritz Kreisler, 
the great Viennese violinist. Mr. Kreisler, whose tour is under 
the direction of C. A. Ellis, manager of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra, will make his only appearances in Northern Cali- 
fornia as soloist with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, 
Friday afternoon, February 20th ; Mr. Kreisler playing the Bee- 
thoven Concerto, and in two great recitals : at the Cort Theatre, 
Sunday afternoon, February 22d, and Scottish Rite Hall, Thurs- 
day night, February 26th. Kreisler's every appearance this sea- 
son is in the nature of a triumph, and in order to gratify his 
desire to appear in San Francisco, Mr. Ellis has been compelled 
to refuse the most flattering of offers for recitals in Eastern 
cities. 





Carolyn Thomson, the nineteen-year-old prima donna, who 
sir.gs the title role in "Adele," the century's most notable musical 
offering, to be seen at the Columbia Theatre for two weeks, be- 
ginning Monday night, January 25th. 



Columbia. — The calibre of the organization presenting 
"Adele," which has created a furore in New York for the past 
six months, and which will be the attraction at the Columbia 
Theatre for two weeks beginning next Sunday night, is indi- 
cated by the management's claim that the running expenses ex- 
ceed $5,000 weekly. "Adele" will be presented here with the 
following players: Carolyn Thomson, John Park, Nanette Flack, 
George O'Donnell, Lottie Vincent, Alfred Kappler, Ralph 
Nairn, Jules Espailly, Lawrence Knapp and the famous "Adele" 
beauties. The operetta is sumptuously mounted, and a metro- 
politan orchestra of twenty will add to the beauty of the twenty- 
two real song hits, in which the famous "Adele" beauties will 
be seen wearing the latest revelations of the Parisian modistes. 



Frances Cameron, who will appear next week at the Orpheum. 



To have achieved in 2an Francisco, the city of beautiful 

women, the distinction of producing the most heartily endorsed 
cosmetics, is a matter for congratulation. This is the position 
occupied by the Aubrey Sisters, whose toilet preparations, hav- 
ing a vogue throughout fashionable America, are here con- 
sidered of the highest merit and are fast superceding all others 
in the estimation of the judicious. As a direct result of this 
growing popularity, it has been decided to place a comprehen- 
sive exhibit of the Aubrey Sisters' products on the main floor 
of Techau Tavern. The date of this event will soon be an- 
nounced, and in the meantime souvenirs of these desirable pre- 
parations will be presented to the ladies who visit the Tavern 
on Saturday afternoons. 

■ : Lament) 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 24, 1914. 






ITJNANCIALJ 



The New York market discounted 
Security Market in the President's message and lapsed 

The East and Europe, into a narrow, irregular condition 

with profit takers keenly on the 
watch to scalp. The message, which was received favorably 
here and abroad, confirmed the impression that further proceed- 
ings on the part of the administration would be along lines that 
will not upset the equilibrium of the existing order of things, 
nor retard business betterments now so promisingly under way. 
Under such a feeling, the undertone of the market was neces- 
sarily strong. Upward fluctuations, however, continued to be 
followed with rer.lizing. Coppers were prominent in a better 
position. An interrogation point, however, still hangs over the 
market. The organization of the Federal Reserve banks occu- 
pies the foreground in financial discussions. Members of the 
National Association of Bank Supervisors have recommended 
that all State banks enter the Federal reserve system. A more 
optimistic feeling is creeping over the country, stimulated by 
big plants in the East putting more men to work and the reports 
of increasing demands for goods. The money situation is also 
reported easier. Secretary Redfield says that trade conditions 
are fundamentally sound, and that the tide has unquestionably 
turned in the long drawn out business depression. The "un- 
scrambling" of the trust interests of the country continues, un- 
der the pressure of the administration, and "community com- 
bines" continue to crumble. It is generally regarded that re- 
adjustment in the prices of securities, under the new conditions, 
is completed, and that from now on it will simply be a matter 
of the fundamentally sound issues coming to the front again, 
and inviting public confidence. In Europe, the several nations 
occupy the center of the financial stage in their endeavors to 
float loans to back their enormous army, navy and other gen- 
eral government demands. France has been obliged to change 
its Cabinet in order to hurdle a new loan. At present the 
United States of America seems to be in the better position as 
regards the commercial and financial situation. 



Local Trading in High grade bonds in small lots were 

Stocks and Bonds. in demand this week, with the re- 

sult that a number of issues reached 
fractionally better figures; among them were Pac. Gas & Elec, 
Los Angeles Gas & Elec, Great Western Power, San Joaquin 
Light & Power and Western Pacific 5's. Stocks generally were 
inclined to be languid. Associated continued unchanged under 
the profit taking of those who got aboard when the price was 
38 2 4-40. Some 1,500 shares were fed out while the price was 
43-44. Union and Gen. Petroleum eased off on their recent ad- 
vances on the report that the deal of Messrs. Wier and Smith, 
representing the Western Ocean Syndicate, Ltd., a British cor- 
poration, had failed to convince the Stewart interests in control 
of Union that an interchange of stock for the control was a pro- 
fitable venture. Oakland, Antioch and Eastern was given a set- 
back on the announcement of an additional $4 per share assess- 
ment, which means that $400,000 will be collected from stock- 
holders. This sum, with the $700,000 recently raised from the 
California would sell for under the new "ex-rights" of a 10 per 
cent stock dividend. The price ranged from 266 to 269, the 
"rights" selling from 16 to 18. Annual reports are now coming 
in rapidly from all investment quarters, so that investors can 
readily get a good bird's-eye view on the financial conditions of 
the companies in which they are interested. 



Refinancing the 
United Railways 



The leading financiers interested in 
the reorganization plans of the 
United Railways Investment Com- 
pany have been consulting among 
themselves for several weeks past. The plan, said to have been 
decided upon, provides for the organization of a new corpora- 



tion, the securities of which are to be underwritten by banking 
interests in intimate touch with the conferees. Holders of the 
present issue of $16,000,000 pfd. stock are to receive 80 shares 
of the new company for 100 shares of the present company, and 
to receive common stock in payment of the 40 per cent cumula- 
tive dividends on the present pfd. stock. The new pfd. stock, 
under this plan, would pay 6 per cent cumulative dividends, or 
one per cent more than that named in the present pfd. stock. The 
new company will assume all the obligations of the United Rail- 
ways Investment Co., and also act as a holding company. In 
the exchange of stock,' the present stockholders will be asked 
to release the company from liability for the payment of the 40 
per cent back dividends. 

The report of the Municipal Geary street railroad for the 

year shows net profits of $85,345. During the last six months 
of the year the road profited $77,640. During the year the cars 
handled 9,723,177 passengers. The line employes 130 platform 
men at 37y 2 cents per hour on an eight hour day, and their pay 
for the year amounted to $99,498. At present there are 39 
cars in operation on a mileage single track of 15.08 miles. The 
road pays no taxes and does not have to pay for legal or other 
services rendered by other departments of the city government. 
This was the first year of the road under its municipal adminis- 
tration, and there was extraordinary expenses naturally at- 
tached to its organization. Those in charge estimate that the 
profits of the next year will reach approximately $150,000. 



Only two bids were received for the entire block of San 

Francisco bonds offered this week, consisting of $264,000 City 
Hall bonds and $927,500 Municipal Street Railway bonds. The 
successful bid was at an average price of 100.88, yielding 4.93. 
Harris Trust & Savings Bank of Chicago led the bidding with 
100.88. 



While the year 1913 was generally an unprofitable one 

for fish canning concerns, yet the annual report of the Alaska 
Packers Association show profits of $148,380. The total assets 
increased from $9,389,252 to $10,325.28. Quarterly dividends 
of $1.50 per share have been paid right along. The next one 
will be paid February 10th. 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 
Established il;> 

SUTRO & CO. 

410 Montgomery Street 

Detailed Information in Reeard to Any Security 

Will be Furniehed Upon Requeat 

Members— The San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange 



TELEPHONE DOUGLAS 2487 



E. F. HUTTON & CO. 

THE PIONEER HOUSE 

INVESTMENT BONDS 
490 California Street 



Branch ST. FRANCIS 
Members 
New York Stock Exchange 
New York Cotton Exchange 
New York Coffee Exchange 
Chicago Board of Trade 



HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO 
Two Private Wires to 
Chicago and New York 
Denver, 714 Seventeenth Street 
Los Angeles, 112 W. Third Street 
New York, 31-33-35 New Street 



W. D. Fennimore 



A. R.Fennimore 
Davis// / , , 

Wife- 




181 POST ST. ) 

2508 MISSION ST. ( 
1221 BROADWAY 



SAN FRANCISCO 
OAKLAND 



Our fondest dreams 

of a satisfactory eye- 
glass have been real- 
ized in the "Equi- 
poise. " Consider 
these points — 

Automatically adjust them- 
selves. 

eep straicht. 

Do not pinch Ihe nose. 

Inconspicuous. 

Do not make you look old. 

Wear "Equipoise" 



January 24, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



19 




The Way to Success. 

A handsomely printed little book on fine paper is "The 
Power of Mental Demand," by Herbert Edward Law, the well 
known San Francisco capitalist and extensive owner of real 
estate. The book is a thoughtful brochure pointing the way to 
success in life, and emphasizing the value of concentration. 
The keynote of Mr. Law's argument may be found in the fol- 
lowing passage : 

"To desire an end intently is, to a practical, logical mind, 
to group about the effort to accomplish it every element of 
thought, of advantage, of circumstance, of surroundings, of 
fitness to its achievement. It is to summon and direct every 
power of the mind and every element of success to the accom- 
plishment of desire. This marshalling of elements which go to 
make up success is to set in train cause and effect. It is the con- 
dition and the only condition under which and through which 
the entire effort can be made to apply. 

"People who make great successes are often thought of as 
people of one idea. They so intently desire the thing they aim 
for that they exclude all distracting things. Thus, that meas- 
ure of singleness of concentration is secured which swings direct 
to the mark, when half-hearted effort loses its way, and the 
will, divided, fails of its goal. What intense concentration 
may accomplish is impossible to any other measure of thought 
and effort." 

No more useful and suggestive book could be put in the 
hands of a young man starting out in life. 

"The Power of Mental Demand," by Herbert E. Law. Pub- 
lished by Paul Elder & Co., San Francisco. 



Who Wrote this Book? 

"Home" is the title of a daring novel anonymously printed, 
which we may be permitted to suspect is the work of a lady 
novelist, because of its daring quality and analysis of sex re- 
lations. The book deals in an interesting fashion with what 
the dramatic critics affect to call the "eternal triangle," which 
time out of mind has made the basis of the French play. It 
is the story of two New England boys and a girl, Gerry Lansing, 
Alan Wayne and Alix Deering. Gerry, who has wealth, be- 
comes a futile, high-living, conventional repetition of the man 
of his class; follows the traditions of his family and falls into 
a lethargy of effortless living. He marries Alix, a beautiful, 
frivolous woman, whom he soon ceases to interest. Alan plays 
fast and loose with his guardian's money (which he supposes 
is his own), and wins the affection of the many women who 
please his fancy. When he learns that the money is not his 
own, he takes a bridge-building job in Africa, becomes a terror 
to the natives, and is known as "Ten Per Cent Wayne" in the 
neighborhood of the Equator. He repays his guardian and at 
intervals reappears in civilization, where he luxuriates in fas- 
tidious and expensive living and smashes more hearts. Alan 
has always fascinated Alix, and, meeting on shipboard by 
chance, they drift from flirtation to infatuation. Gerry grows 
jealous, and Alix leaves him to go to Alan. She changes her 
mind before the train starts, however, and comes home. 

Throughout the book runs the keynote given by the old home 
as in these passages : 

"Red Hill does not belong to a Lansing nor to a Wayne nor 
to an Elton. It is the eternal mother of us all. Broken or 
mended, Lansings and Waynes have come back to the Hill 
through generations. City of refuge or harbor of peace, it's all 
one to the Hill. Remember that." 

"That's the dear thing about Maple House — it is always wait- 
ing. And that's what makes it Home. Sometimes in the lonely 
nights I wake up into a dream, and the old house is ringing with 
the sounds of the children of a hundred years at play. They 
laugh and sometimes they cry, but there is one that never 



laughs or cries. He is a chubby little boy with awful staring 
eyes for a baby, and he carries a wooden sword and a paper 
drum. It's the old captain, I'm sure, and once you have seen 
him as a chubby soldier of three, you'll begin to know the se- 
cret of Maple House— that it's waiting for us to come back, 
young or old. And if you are very, very still for a very long 
time.you can hear the old house breathe, and then you know 
that m every closet and in every corner it has hidden away a 
beating heart. It never loses one." 

The writer has a knack of epigram and a sharp wit on occa- 
sion. 

Published by the Century Company, New York. Price, $1.30 
net. 



OBITUARY. 



Mrs. Eliza A. Hood. 

Mrs. Eliza A. Hood, widow of the late William Hood of Los 
Guilicos, Sonoma County, died a ther home, 2020 Broadway, 
in this city, on Wednesday last. The Hood family have been 
an important part of the social, agricultural and political history 
of California, and during the time when Sonoma was the capi- 
tal of the State, the famous Los Guilicos rancho of 2,000 acres 
was an important center of social and political life. 



Vicar-General Prendergast. 

The Very Rev. John J. Prendergast, vicar-general of the dio- 
cese under Archbishop Riordan, died in this city on Monday 
last. Father Prendergast had been vicar-general ever since 
1874. A brief sketch of his life was given by the Rev. Father 
Ramm, who delivered the funeral sermon on Wednesday, as 
follows : 

"He was ordained by the distinguished Bishop Moriarty on 
the 26th of June, 1859, and set out almost immediately for the 
strange land where the remainder of his life was to be spent. 
He came by way of the Isthmus, and reached San Francisco on 
the 12th day of November of the same year. A month later he 
was assigned to the parish of Stockton as the assistant of Dr. 
Maurice. Here he remained less than a year, when he was re- 
called by Archbishop Alemany and assigned to the parish of 
the Mission Dolores. Upon the death of Father Carroll, 1861, 
Father Prendergast became rector, as well as president of the 
Ecclesiastical Seminary of St. Thomas Aquinas, which was at 
that time conducted at the Mission. He fulfilled both of these 
offices until 1867, when he was summoned to the cathedral as 
first assistant. In 1874 he was placed in permanent charge of 
the cathedral. In the same year, Father Prendergast was 
named vicar-general of the archdiocese. He retained both of 
these offices up to the time of his death." 

The pall bearers at the funeral were Rev. John Rogers, Rev. 
P. E. Mulligan, Rev. Edward P. Dempsey, Rev. Peter C. Yorke, 
Rev. Joseph B. Byrne, Rev. J. B. Hannigan, Rev. P. O'Ryan and 
Rev. John McGinty. 



Samuel H. Willey. 

Dr. Samuel H. Willey, founder of the College of California, 
which later developed into the University of California, died 
on Wednesday last at his home in Berkeley in his 93d year. 
Dr. Willey was a native of New Hampshire and a pioneer of 
California, arriving at Monterey in 1849. He graduated from 
Dartmouth College in 1845, and was prominent in this State 
as pastor, educator and historian. Dr. Willey was one of the 
central figures in the golden jubilee of the University of Cali- 
fornia in 1910, and at that time he was given the honorary de- 
gree of Doctor of Laws. 



William Curlett. 

William Curlett, an architect of more than local fame, died 
last Wednesday at his home in Menlo Park. Mr. Curlett was at 
one time a partner of Augustus Laver, who planned the City 
Hall which was destroyed by fire in 1906. After the fire, Mr. 
Curlett was the architect of the Phelan block on Market street 
and many of the other important edifices of the reconstruction 
period in San Francisco. His latest work was the construction 
of a handsome summer f.ome for James D. Phelan in the Santa 
Cruz mountains. Mr. Curlett was a member of the Bohemian 
Club and a Mason of the thirty-second degree. 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 24, 1914. 




IlNSVMCEi 




Los Angeles representatives of all lines of insurance will, on 
January 26th, give a farewell dinner to Garner Curran, who 
leaves for San Francisco on February 1st, for a two years' 
stay as executive secretary to the World's Insurance Congress 
and deputy commissioner to the Panama-Pacific Exposition. 
The invitations are signed by Frank E. Walsh, secretary Cas- 
ualty Underwriters' Association; J. E. Phelps, secretary Los 
Angeles Fire Underwriters; E. A. Roe, secretary California 
Pond Blue Goose, and W. McClelland, secretary Life Under- 
writers' Association of Los Angeles. On the following evening 
Secretary Curran will be banqueted by the Advertising Men's 
Association. 

* * * 

The Western Casualty and Guaranty Company has secured 
control of the California Guarantee Life and Accident Company 
of Sacramento by the purchase of two-thirds of the latter's stock 
and will at once apply for a license from the California Insur- 
ance Department to get ready for business. The company will 
be reconstructed from a managerial standpoint, but D. W. Car- 
michiel will be retained as president. The home office of the 
California Guarantee and Life will remain at Sacramento. It 
is expected that everything will be in readiness for writing of 

business before January 20th. 

* * * 

The resignation of William J. Dutton from the presidency 
of the Fireman's Fund Insurance Company, an office which he 
has ably filled for many years, leaves him free to devote much 
time to the work of the executive committee of the World's 
Insurance Congress, of which he is chairman. His well known 
executive ability and familiarity with large undertakings, such 
as the Congress promises to be, makes him particularly valu- 
able in this position. 

* * * 

The Home Insurance Company of New York is first, as usual, 
in compiling its figures for the Pacific Coast. This company 
embraces in its Pacific Department the States of Alaska, Ari- 
zona, British Columbia, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, 
Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyom- 
ing. Risks written in this department amount to $117,082,744; 
premiums, $1,450,684; losses paid, $671,207; losses incurred, 
$706,583. In Colorado, the company wrote $9,922,672; on 
which the premiums were $103,659, and losses $38,720 paid 
and $44,104 incurred. 

* * * 

San Francisco's fire insurance premiums last year aggre- 
gated, for California companies, one hundred and fifty-seven 
thousand eight hundred dollars; other State companies, two 
million, one hundred and seventy-four thousand, four hundred; 
foreign companies, one million, one hundred and sixty-six thou- 
sand, five hundred. Total, three million, four hundred and 
ninety-eight thousand, seven hundred, as against four million, 

one hundred and sixty thousand, nine hundred for 1912. 

* * * 

The Industrial Accident Commission reports that to date over 
$175,000 in premiums have been collected by the accident de- 
partment, which represents more than $15,000,000 in pay rolls. 
The commission also declares that its enlarged activities have 
been commended both by the larger employers and their em- 
ployees. 

The Indiana State Life has been licensed by the California 
Department, and Paul G. Hausman, formerly of the Prudential 
of Texas, who expects to form a partnership connection with 
two other well known life insurance men and push for business. 
Offices have been engaged in the Monadnock Building. 

* * * 

R. B. Robertson, who has been engaged in the casualty busi- 
ness at Seattle, has been made special agent of the London and 
Lancashire Guarantee and Accident for California. Mr. Rob- 
ertson was formerly general agent at Seattle for the Royal In- 
demnity. 



Former President E. F. Green, of the Pacific Coast Casualty 
Co., is said to be the principal mover in the organization of the 
World Assurance Company of Vancouver, B. C, which, with 
a capital of $200,000 and a like surplus, will write fire, burglary, 
plate glass, casualty, surety and fidelity lines. It expects to 

be writing business within the next few months. 

* * * 

Bernard Faymonville has been re-elected president of the 
Underwriters' Fire Patrol of San Francisco, Frank J. Devlin 
vice-president, and Mr. Folger secretary. J. W. Gunn and Dix- 
well Hewitt were the new directors, the others being H. L. 

Roff, Carl A. Henry, F. J. Devlin and Bernard Faymonville. 

* * * 

Edward M. Brodenstein, former chief clerk of the Harry 

H. Smith agency, has been advanced to the position of branch 

secretary of the Law Union and Rock and the Union Assurance 

Companies, of which Mr. Smith is Pacific Coast manager. 

* * * 

L. H. Wood, of Los Angeles, has been added to the field 
force of the Home Insurance Company in Lower California. 



1863 



1913 



FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 

Capital $1,500,000 Assets, $10,000,000 

FIRE MARINE AUTOMOBILE 

California and Saniome Streets, San Francisco, California. 

The West Coast Life Ins. Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

A strong, well-managed Institution; organized under the rigid lnauranc* 
hwi of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit, and define and 
guard the Interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 

The Connecticut Fire Ins. Co. 

OF HARTFORD. ESTABLISHED I860. 
SIXTY-THIRD ANNUAL STATEMENT. 

Capital 11.000.000 

Total Assets 7.736.110 

Surplus to Policyholders 3.266.021 

Pacific Department: 

The Insurance Exchange San Francisco, Cal. 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager. 
Geo. F, Billings Roy C. Ward Geo. B. Dinsmore J. C. Messsdorffer Jtmei W. Dean 

GEO. E. BILLINGS CO. 

INSURANCE BROKERS AND AVERAGE ADJUSTERS 
S12 California St., San Francisco, Cal. Phone Douglas 2283 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 

(Best in the West) 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevator, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobile, Burglary. Plate Glass, Accident and Health 
Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

T. L. Miller, President; L. B. Iloge. General Manager Accident and 
Ileal th Department. 

Head Office— Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. 

The Home Insurance Company 



Organized 1853. 



Cash Capital. $3,000,000 



Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners any- 
where In United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss by 
fire. Automobile insurance. Indemnity for loss of rental income by fire. 
H. L. ROFF. General Agent. J. J. SHEAHAN, Ass't General Agent. 

321 Saniome Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



January 24, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



James L. Collins, formerly of the Los Angeles firm of Whit- 
tington and Collins, for some time representing the Aetna and 
later the Pacific Mutual Life, has become associated with Man- 
ager John Newton Russell, Jr., as assistant manager at the home 

office of the Pacific Mutual Life. 

» » * 

The resignation is announced of W. C. Hammond, secretary 
of the West Coast Life. Mr. Hammond came from the East 
about one year ago to accept the office. His successor will be 

named at the annual meeting. 

* * * 

The Reliance Life has transferred M. T. Shumate from Waco, 

Tex., to Los Angeles, where he will be manager. 

* * * 

C. B. Cornell, who has been assistant manager, under Chas. 
J. Bostworth, of the Fidelity & Casualty's California depart- 
ment, has been advanced to the post of associate manager. 

* 6 * 

There is no foundation for the generally circulated report 
that the beautiful San Francisco building of the Metropolitan 
Life suffered from the effects of the recent Stockton street tun- 
nel cave. 

« * * 

George W. Ingram, one time insurance commissioner of 

Washington, D. C, has connected himself with the automobile 

department of the Property Underwriters' Association in the 

C. J. Stovel agency. 

* * * 

The Cobb general agency has appointed W. W. Jaquette to 

represent their companies in Southern California. 

* * * 

J. Percy Carroll, former special agent under Manager Harry 
H. Smith, of the Law Union and Rock and the Commercial 
Union, has been advanced to the office of Superintendent of 

Agencies. 

* * * 

W. M. Patterson is no longer special agent for the Union As- 
surance in Washington and Oregon. 

* * * 

R. H. Jenkins has been engaged by Macdonald and Miles to 
do field work for the Citizens and Hamburg-Bremen in North- 
ern California and Nevada, succeeding George A. Yocum. 

* * * 

Former Secretary Hamilton A. Bauer, of the Pacific Coast 
Casualty Co., will enter the practice of the law. 

V * * 

A. A. Johnson succeeds S. L. Dexter as the Northern Califor- 
nia representative of the Great Republic Life of Los Angeles. 

* » * 

The Standard Life of Pittsburg will withdraw from Califor- 
nia. The company has been represented by W. J. Justin, who 
came from Pennsylvania. 



Man never realizes what mutual sorrow really is until 

he reads an editor's regrets. — Puck. 



First Wall Street Broker— Anything to do to-day? Sec- 
ond Wall Street Broker (indignantly)— Certainly I have nothing 
to do. First Wall Street Broker— Come to a funeral with me. 
It will cheer you up a bit. — Lite. 



The Vienna Cafe is one of the noted restaurants of a city 

famed all over the world for good living and high-class places 
of entertainment, where the markets supply everything that is 
good to eat. This cafe, under enlightened direction, goes in 
largely for specialties in the way of the culinary art. Its beef- 
steaks have wide reputation, and its soups and salads are ex- 
quisitely flavored. Located in the heart of the business and 
theatre district, the Vienna Cafe is right in the center of San 
Francisco life, and is known as the home of dainty eating. Its 
wines and liquors are well selected, and the keynote of man- 
agement is found in the fact that first class meals are supplied 
at moderate prices. The cafe will be found on O'Farrell street, 
near Powell, and close to the Orpheum Theatre. 



WE WILL MOVE. JANUARY 26 

TO 

228 POWELL STREET 

Next Block North Same Side of Street 

F. L. HEIM &, SON 

AIi'M.'.v ami H'miifri'j Fine Shoes 

Sole Agents For 

Dr. A. Reed'« Cushion Shoe and Heim - » Orthopedic Shoe 



THE BALMACAAN 

Quite the proper thing with young 
men and many older ones. A loose, roomy 
coat of smart lines, 44 to 48 inches long— 
button-to-neck collar, with raglan or kim- 
ona sleeves. All cravenet- 
ted. Comes in rough home- 
i spuns, tweeds and cheviots. 

Priced 

$25 to $40 

The # tab 

Cfras.Keilus & Co.dno 

726- MARKET STREET 




"San Francisco 
Limited" 

— Another fast 
daily train 
to the east 

CHICAGO 

in 69 l /2 Hours 

From Ferry Station - - 5:00 P.M. 
From Oakland (16th St.) - 5:35 P. M. 
Ar. Chicago, C. & N. W. Ry. 4:30P.M. 
Ar. Chicago, C. M. & St. P. Ry. 4:30 P. M. 

Standard Pullman and Tourist Sleeping Cars 
Dining Car 

UNION PACIFIC 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

THE EXPOSITION LINE— 1915 



22 



San F 



rancisco 



News Letter 



January 24, 1914. 




By R. R. l'Hommedieu. 

At a meeting held in the office of Mayor Dudley at Santa 
Monica, Cal., the question of guarding the course for the Van- 
derbilt and Grand Prize races of February 21st and 23d was 
discussed. The city of Santa Monica has taken over the work 
of guarding the 8.2 miles, and the matter has been placed in 
charge of Chief of Police Randall. He has been empowered 
to secure as many men as possible to make the course safe, and 
arrangements are now being made to secure the State militia. 
Randall has had charge of this work for former races, and no 
race course in the world has been better guarded than Santa 
Monica. The spectators have never been permitted to crowd 
onto the course, and as a result, the racing drivers have at all 
times had a perfect roadway. More fences will be built than 
before, and spectators will not be allowed within two hundred 
yards of the Nevada avenue turn. The turn and the roadway 
for two hundred yards on each side will be fenced off. 

The curves will not be banked, but much additional work 
will be done to make the turns even safer than before, and all 
this will tend toward a faster course. The entire eight miles 
will be resurfaced, and this work will start immediately. Some 
points regarding the improvement of the course will be left un- 
til the return of Chairman Shettler from the East. Mr. Shett- 
ler is visiting the principal cities in the East getting his entries 
lined up, and wires that there is every indication of the greatest 
field that ever faced a starter in these classics. 

A grand stand will be erected to accommodate 20,000 people. 
There is a proposition to change the location of the stands. 
Last year they were located on the ocean front. The cars made 
their fastest time down the Palisades, and it may be decided 
to place the stands along this slightly downhill stretch. This 
will be left for decision until the return of Mr. Shettler. 

• • • 

The New Auto Club 

The San Francisco headquarters of the Automobile Club of 
Northern California in the St. Francis Hotel has become a very 
popular place among the motorists. The club also has head- 
quarters at the Key Route Inn, Oakland. Secretary Franklin, 
in speaking of the new club, says: 

"Among the things proposed by the club is to issue an up- 
to-date road book of this part of the State, telling of their 
conditions and what may be expected when one travels over 
them. It is proposed to issue this in loose-leaf form, so that 
the members will always have the latest information at hand. 
It proposes to keep a corpse of engineers constantly traveling 
over the roads to secure this information. The club also pro- 
poses to retain some of the best attorneys to look after the in- 
terests of the owners; in fact, the club proposes to do every- 
thing possible for its members that can be desired. 

"There is a mistaken idea that the club is going into the 
handling of accessories; this is, however, an error, for the rea- 
son that it does not propose to interfere with the business of 
others. The club at present has quarters in the hotel, where 
members desiring to change their costume for evening func- 
tions may do so without returning home. 

The officers of the association are : President, Lin S. Church ; 
first vice-president, Fred G. Wight; second vice-president, Dr. 
O. D. Hamlin; treasurer, H. B. Lyon; secretary, Fred M. 
Franklin. 

* * • 

Strained Traffic Law 

The action of the police judges in San Francisco in forcing 
the traffic laws has brought out opposition from the motor car 
dealers' association. The serving out of extreme sentences for 
technical violations has caused motor car buyers to withhold 
purchasing cars at the present time. The result has been that 



the members of the dealers' association has suffered accord- 
ingly. 

A committee from the association has been in conference with 
the police judges, and a better understanding of the situation has 
resulted. It is expected from now on that the judges will not 
be so severe in the case of technical violations. This does not 
mean, however, that the owner may expect to be relieved of 
punishment if he commits a technical fraction of the law. 

The dealers' association have asked the police judges to 
serve out extreme penalties in cases where joy-riders i.nd others 
of their kind wilfully disregard the law and the rights and safety 
of the citizen. 

The dealers' association appreciate the seriousness of such 
crimes, and feel that it is this class of drivers which is respon- 
sible for the unpleasantness of the present time. The respect- 
able citizen and careful driver may now enjoy his motor car 
without fearing if he should make some little mistake that he is 
liable to spend hours in a dungeon, thanks to the concerted 
action of the Motor Car Dealers' Association. 

* * * 

Stockton Club Banquet 

The San Joaquin Auto Club held its annual banquet in Stock- 
ton last Monday night, at which a number of officials and promi- 
nent members of the Automobile Club of Northern California 
attended as guests of the Slough City motorists. 

It was a most enjoyable affair, and those who journeyed from 
San Francisco were more than repaid for the trip. A pleasant 
feature of the evening was the arrest of Fred Linz, one of the 
San Francisco visitors. His local friends learned that on a pre- 
vious trip to Stockton, he had been arrested for speeding, but 
later had been released, and no warrant had ever been issued 
against him. Last night they arranged with Captain Finnell, 
of the police, to arrest him on the charge while the banquet was 
at its height. Everything went off as arranged, and before he 
knew it, Linz was being hustled from the banquet room to the 
waiting patrol wagon, and then to jail, where the doors closed 
behind him. He was later released by his friends under the 
pretense that they had put up bail for him. 

Among _the San Francisco motorists who attended was first 
vice-president Fred G. Wright, secretary Fred M. Franklin, 
and James H. Schwabacher of the Automobile Club of Northern 
California; Fred J. Linz, F. A. Marriott, and several others 
from this city. 

• • • 
State Auto Association and Tax 

It looks, if the present State automobile tax is declared void, 
that those who have paid the State treasurer the amount re- 
quired by the law he will find some trouble and delay in getting 
their money back in case the law is declared unconstitutional. 

The officers of the California State Automobile Association 
have secured the legal opinion of several prominent lawyers re- 
garding this refund, and it seems to be the consensus of opinion 
that it will require considerable red tape and time to obtain the 
return of the money. 

To prepare for such an emergency, the officers of the associa- 
tion have already completed plans whereby the members of the 
association, through the officers, will be able to receive their 
money at the earliest moment possible. 

The plans have already been worked out from a legal stand- 
point, and the officers are merely waiting for the results of the 
action of the Supreme Court. Those members of the Associa- 
tion' who wish to take advantage of the preparation made by 
the officers of the association should at once communicate with 
the secretary at the association's headquarters at 687 Market 
street, and secure from him the necessary papers to be filled out 
to obtain the return of the money. 

The officers of the association have tried to secure from the 
State treasurer a list of the names of those who have paid the 
tax so that they could notify their members of the plan made 
for them by the association. The number of applications made, 
however, has swamped the office force at Sacramento, and it 
has been impossible for any one to reach these records, and 
for the association, therefore, to get into direct communication 
with those members that have paid. 

The association, however, has perfected its plans of opera- 
tion, and it only remains for a favorable decision from the 
Supreme Court for them to put it into effect, and proceed to se- 
cure the return of the money to its members. 



January 24, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



Good Roads Prevent Disease 

From the press bulletin of the American Medical Associa- 
tion comes the valuable information that good roads prevent dis- 
ease. The article says: "Few persons, on first thought, would 
see any possible connection between good roads and good 
health. Yet the State Board of Health of Kansas says that good 
roads can and will prevent disease. How? By the removal of 
weeds and trash. Weeds and trash prevent the prompt evapora- 
tion of moisture and promote retention of ground water. This 
makes ideal breeding spots for mosquitoes, flies and other in- 
sects, which are known as disease carriers, not to mention cinch 
bugs, hoppers, and other insects which are crop damagers. Fur- 
thermore, an undergrowth of weeds invites dumping of garbage 
and manure by offering concealment, of which fact careless and 
thoughtless people are prone to take advantage, thus increasing 
the facility of insect breeding and providing these insect cai- 
riers with proper material for disease transmission. Good 
roads also prevent disease by providing good drainage. Many 
farms have no means of drainage except by ditches along 
roadways. Open ditches, clear of brush and debris, with hard- 
ened surface and proper fall, afford these farms the opportu- 
nity of ridding themselves of many a stagnant pool. The re- 
moval of weeds, proper road grading, surface hardening and 
oiling in itself is destructive of insect larvae, especially mos- 
quitoes — a well known fact. Dry roads offer pedestrians, and 
notably children, who are compelled to walk to and from school, 
dry shoes and feet. While colds are due to specific germs, yet 
it is a well known fact that cold, wet feet and chilled limbs 
lower the resistance of individuals, and make the more favor- 



able subjects for infections of the respiratory passages, in- 
cluding pneumonia and tuberculosis. Good roads promote 
travel, and set an example to the farmer whose premises are 
bordered by them. The comparison of a well-graded, clean 
highway with an unkempt and trashy barnyard adjoining is suf- 
ficient to stimulate every landowner to a clean-up. Pride com- 
pels him to offer to passers-by a neat appearing and attractive 
house and barnyard. Results are only too obvious. Good roads 
are active disease prevention agencies, aside from their finan- 
cial and commercial value." 

* * * 

House Auto 

A genuine house-automobile is owned by Mr. and Mrs. J. 
H. Allen, of Sacramento. Allen is seventy-two years old, and 
his wife is only a few years his junior. 

The camp wagon body was built entirely by the proprietor 
and chauffeur of the outfit. There are four screened windows 
and a screen door in back. Isinglass window panes are avail- 
able in case of rain. The dining room table folds up against the 
wall when not in use, and the bed folds against the opposite 
wall. An oil burner has a place in the rear corner of the house 
on wheels. The food lockers are under and beside the stove. 
When the parlor, bedroom and dining room furniture are not in 
use, there is sufficient room for several persons to stand in the 
little rooms. 

The car is twenty horsepower. Allen has made two trips to 
Los Angeles and San Diego, and has been into Nevada with his 
wife and niece. This is their first trip to Butte County. A 
couple of small skye terriers are also members of the party. 



News Gathered Along Auto Row 




The San Francisco home of Osen-McFarland Auto Co., agents 
for the Mitchell and Empire cars. 

— Photo by Arthur Spaulding Co. 

Osen Back from Mitchell Factory 

George Osen has returned brimful of enthusiasm from the 
Mitchell factory. Osen made his annual trip East with A. D. 
Curtner, another member of the firm of Osen-McFarland Au- 
tomobile Company. From Osen's report, everything is in splen- 
did shape at the Mitchell factory, the reorganization has worked 
wonders, and with designer Bate in command, they are turning 
out a more refined vehicle, and in quantities that allow of im- 
mediate delivery. 

While the trip was one of business, yet it was productive of 
some amusing incidents to the California party, the first occa- 
sion to break the monotony happening on their arrival in Chi- 
cago. They arrived at 11:45 a. m., and finding that they had 
three or four hours to wait before proceeding to Racine, Osen 
phoned to the factory, telling of their coming. He was informed 
that Bate was in Chicago at that time and would leave at noon 



on the Twentieth Century Limited for the New York show. 
Hurrying to the New York Central Depot they found Bate, 
who induced them to accompany him to the show. They had 
just twenty minutes to get their baggage from the Santa Fe 
Depot, two miles away. Curtner rushed out and handed the 
taxicab driver a greenback, which he was not familiar with, be- 
ing from California, and then began a wild ride through the 
congested traffic of Chicago. It took just fourteen minutes to 
make the round-trip and get the baggage, and Curtner was won- 
dering what sign the driver was giving to the traffic officers to 
get the right-of-way until he figured up his cash on the train; 
then he found the solution to it all when he realized that he had 
given the taxi driver a twenty dollar greenback tip for a 
dollar. 

On the return to the factory during a 160 mile drive with the 
weather below zero, they came upon one of the lakes of Wis- 
consin where they were ice-yachting. This was a novelty to 
Curtner, but one that Osen enjoyed in days gone by. Curtner 
decided to try the sensation; he tried a short spin and then 
decided to take a ten mile trip across the lake and back again. 
He started out, and an hour and a half later was seen approach- 
ing the shore on foot. It seems that the skipper had run into an 
open hole in the ice, and Curtner had been dumped overboard, 
getting wet almost to his waist. Realizing the danger of the 
situation, Curtner and the skipper set up a merry pace across the 
ice to keep from freezing, but as it was, Curtner arrived with 

his trowsers frozen as stiff as a board." 

* * * 

Kissel Kar at the Show 

There were at the New York automobile show a great many 
stunning cars built especially for show purposes, and only pro- 
curable by the public on special order. That it paid the manu- 
facturers to exhibit these "special jobs" was proved by the 
large number of sales made off the floor, for delivery after the 
close of the show. One of the decidedly attractive exhibits was 
that of the Kissel Motor Car Company, which presented the 
following special cars : A "4-40" roadster, painted a rich blue- 
black and upholstered in blue Spanish leather; a "4-40" five 
passenger touring car, painted and upholstered in purple lake, a 
novel and very handsome finish; a "6-60" touring car, uphol- 
stered in gray motor cloth; a gray "6-48" roadster with slip 
covers. In addition to these, standard models were shown in 
sedans and touring cars of all three Kissel Kar chasses. 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 24, 1914. 



Take Care of Tire Equipment 

"Owners of motor cars should pay particular attention tothe 
tire equipment at this season of the year. For at present it is 
the hardest on tires of any time of the year," says B. H. Pratt, 
Pacific Coast Manager of the Fisk Tire and Rubber Company. 

"Now is the time to beware of cuts in the casings, cuts that 
are deep enough to lay bare the fabric construction, and the 
tire should be immediately repaired by any good method of 
healing such cuts. This is the rainy season of the year, and if 
these cuts are not filled up, water will get through to the fabric. 
That means ruin for the tire. The water is bound to rot the 
fabric, and then when it weakens the carcass sufficiently, the 
casing will burst. 

"Even small cuts that reach into the fabric should _ 'be 
watched, for while the casing may not show the result of this at 
the present time, yet sooner or later, maybe during the height 
of the touring season, a blow-out will happen from the rotting 
of the fabric, and serious inconvenience given to the owner at 
a time when he most needs his car. Many tires are brought to 
the dealer, and a branch house during the touring season for 
this very reason, owners claiming that for no reason at all the 
tire suddenly exploded on the road where the climatic condi- 
tions are perfect. Even during a cool spell, the tire blows out, 
and it is hard to find a reason ; close examination, however, of 
the tire shows that the fabric has rotted, which can only result 
from a wetting received through the long winter season. The 
average owner does not pay enough attention to his tires. He 
will find, however, if he insists on his driver, or takes the trou- 
ble himself to pay stricter attention to his tire equipment than 
he does to-day, he will not only save money, but will have the 
satisfaction of enjoying every trip out into the country to its 
fullest extent." 

* * * 

Rain Helps Auto Trade 

Most encouraging indications are noted by the Frank 0. Ren- 
strom Company, Regal dealers, since the rains. Although the 
wet spell came only a short time ago, the Renstrom concern 
has noticed a twenty-five per cent increase in country sales over 
last week. The rains prevented the rancher from doing his us- 
ual work, and gave him an opportunity to come to the city, and 
with the encouragement of good crops to back him up, incident 
to the rains, he felt justified in spending the money for the car 
he had wanted for so long. A continued dry spell, and but little 
rain this winter season, would have had a pronounced effect 
on the automobile industry in so far as the farmers are con- 
cerned. Quite naturally, the automobile men are jubilant, and 
not only the Renstrom people, but many other dealers, are 
greatly pleased with the prospects among their rural friends. It 
is a certainty now that many cars will be sold to ranchers dur- 
ing the next few months." 

* * * 

Chauslor & Lyon Annual Conference 

The annual conference of the members of Chanslor & Lyon 
Company and branch managers was held in this city last Mon- 
day. The company's interests cover the whole coast, and the 
reports from the different branch managers indicate one of the 
greatest season in the automobile accessory line that has ever 
been enjoyed. Waller G. Chanslor, in speaking of the outlook 
in the southern part of the State, says : 

"The orange crop down South will be large enough to offset 
the losses of last season, allowing greater profits for this season 
than ever before." 

Phil Lyons, also speaking of conditions in the South, says: 
"Los Angeles is boosting hard for the big Fair in San Francisco 
as well as the Fair in the sister city of San Diego, while Los 
Angeles is not to have the Fair, yet the merchants there realize 
that they are between the two and are bound to reap the bene- 
fits of the large number of tourists that will pass through the 
city from one fair to the other." 

On the 27th of the month, Chanslor leaves on a four months' 
trip through the Orient, visiting China, Japan, Honolulu, 
Manila. He will return by way of Vancouver. 

* * * 

Vanderbllt Race 

The Vanderbilt cup race has been scheduled for February 
21st to 23d. This means that California this year will be the 
center of the racing in the United States. 



Vacation With a Motorcycle 

"Vacation trips by motorcycle offer so many delightful possi- 
bilities that this method of touring is growing rapidly in popu- 
larity," says S. A. Falor, manager Motorcycle Tire Depart- 
ment, The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., Akron, Ohio. 

"The improvements that have been added to the single seated 
machine, making it possible to carry another rider, have aided 
materially in the growth of the motorcycle. Any single-seated 
motorcycle of a standard make can now be converted into a 
two-seated machine by the addition of a tandem seat or side 
car. The amount of power compressed in so small a space is 
not equaled in any other self-propelled vehicle. The maximum 
of motive power in a minimum of space is made possible 
through the application of the gas engine to the motorcycle. 

"Furthermore, the cost of operation is lower than that of any 
other motor vehicle. Gasoline and tire expense are absurdly 
low. A valuable talking point in favor of the motorcycle is 

this important factor of upkeep cost." 

* * * 

Goodrich Safety Tread 

"Motorists are fast breaking away from the hide-bound cus- 
tom of laying up their cars for the winter at the first indication 
of cold weather," says E. C. Tibbitts of the B. F. Goodrich Co. 
"This year will mark a tremendous increase in the number who 
will keep their cars in continuous service the entire year. 

"One of the chief objections, hitherto, to winter motoring 
has been the dangerous conditions of travel occasioned by bad 
roads, necessitating the use of chains, which often have a 
costly effect upon tire maintenance. But with Safety Tread 
tires now sold at prices less than previously asked for smooth 
treads, motorists are enabled to equip their cars with tires that 
are not only economical in first cost and in mileage rendered, 
but which assure the cars a safe foothold on the road-bed, no 
matter how slippery, slushy or icy. 

"The 'Safety First' movement which we have fathered in its 
application to all season motoring has encouraged autoists to 
take no chances, yet has afforded them the opportunity to do 
so at low expense. The Goodrich Co. has furthermore an- 
nounced a reduction in the price of tires, including their Safety 
Treads, so that everything is highly favorable to economical 
and safe winter car operation, and motorists are not failing to 
take advantage of the opportunity." 

• • • 

Some Bulck Automobiles 

The public has very little conception of the enormous amount 
of money that represents the invested interest in the motor car 
trade. That is, the amount of money necessary to handle the 
business at the present day. This can better be appreciated 
from a report of R. K. Roberts, general manager of the Howard 
Automobile Company. Roberts says: 

"Very few people would think that from the first of August 
when we received our first 1914 model to the present time the 
automobiles we have received represent a value of $2,438,460. 
This is for 1929 Buick cars. Some people wonder why we are 
so optimistic, and in these figures they can get the answer, for 
the 1914 selling season has not yet begun, and yet we 
have received this number of cars out of which we have but few 
for immediate delivery. Between the time we received our first 
car and the big train load, we received 128 carloads with a value 
of $808,766, the trainload of 88 cars represented a valuation of 
$522,374. 

"Since the big trainload we have received 188 carloads valued 
at $1,107,320, our largest number of carloads to be received 
in one day outside of the big trainload was recently, when we 
received 26 carloads, with a value of $165,469; this gives us a 
total of 414 carloads since the season opened. 

"While these figures may seem to be surprisingly large to the 
uninitiated, yet this is only part of the enormous business trans- 
acted by the automobile trade in San Francisco. We are taking 
all the cars that the factory will give us. We absolutely know 
that there is a sale for every Buick that we can get, and we 
have already realized the fact that our allotment of the season's 
output of the factory will not supply the demand. 

"Those merchants who have been experiencing slack trade 
the last ninety days, and who are fearing for the city's com- 
mercial future, should ponder over these facts. The year 1914 is 
going to be the greatest in the history of California and San 
Francisco from a commercial standpoint." 



January 24, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



New Empire Model 

Another new model Empire has just been announced. The 
new roadster is by tar the most attractive vehicle that this 
well known factory has turned out. In speaking of the new car, 
O. C. McFarland, of Osen-McFarland Auto Company, agents 
for the Empire car, says : 

"In the new Empire stream line roadster is presented a two- 
passenger car of exceptional lines and character. The chassis 
is the standard new series Model "31" Empire, and the only 
variation from this is the location of the gasoline tank, which 
in the roadster is under the sweeping stream line cowl. 

"The design of this new roadster is eclipsed by no car in the 
world, the stream line from the radiator sweeps along the swell- 
ing hood to the windshield of ingenious design convertible into 
rain vision, ventilating and clear vision. 

"The cowl and body blend in sweeping curves that swell to 
allow for a generously wide seat, and the body lines swing past 
this to form a decked-in baggage compartment at the rear of 
the seat. The stream line body ends at the rear tire iron car- 
riers, in a door that opens upward into the big baggage com- 
partment under the deck. 

"The roadster interior is roomy and luxuriously upholstered 
with deep Turkish cushions. The seat is wide, placed low to 
give the acme of riding and driving comfort. The baggage 
compartment is almost a yard wide, and the length of it is 
nearly as great. So the new stream line roadster has adequate 
baggage storage room for long distance touring, and will serve 
the needs of the business or professional man who sometimes 
has to carry two or three bags or suit cases. The roadster is 
also optionally equipped with Remy electric starting and light- 
ing system, as is the electric started and light Empire touring 

car." 

* * * 

What Is the Best Automobile ? 

What is the best automobile? is being continually asked by 
the buying public. There is not an automobile dealer or any 
one connected with the trade but what is always being con- 
fronted with this question. J. I. McMullen, general manager of 
the Jeffery Auto Sales Company, in speaking of this question, 
says : "The best motor car is the one to which first is backed 
up by the right kind of a car making it. The buying public 
should consider: Is the company financially strong enough to 
carry out its manufacturing and selling policy? Has it suffi- 
cient means to enable it to conduct experiments necessary to 
actually prove its theories? Can it afford to send engineers 
abroad to bring to its product the best the world affords in 
modern engineering practice and design — the experience of the 
wise head everywhere? Has it a name and reputation in the 
industry for conservatism and stability, or is it known to follow 
the public whims and catch at every new idea^only to drop 
them as quickly? Has the public confidence in the manufac- 
turers' permanency regardless of whether or not it has always 
agreed with his mechanical practice or design ? Is the manufac- 
turer really one, or is he an assembler, putting into this season's 
car parts which next year he must of necessity discard and re- 
pudiate, leaving behind him a trail of disgruntled parts makers 
who are not likely to serve last year's buyers of his cars as 
promptly and cheerfully as those using now those parts? Are 
parts makers' profits and selling expense included in the 'costs' 
which form the basis for the retail selling price of his car? 
Has he a plant equal to every manufacturing contingency, so 
that deliveries are not dependent upon a score of parts makers? 
Has his manufacturing experience been long and comprehen- 
sive enough to qualify him to know how to build value into a 
car? Is his machinery modern and his overhead reduced to a 
minimum because his plant and equipment have grown up 
with the industry and kept pace with its requirements? Have 
his "big men" worked and striven with his problems for years? 
Are experiments in cost reduction in the past? Does he main- 
tain a well managed parts service department at the plant so 
that repair parts for any and all models may be had promptly 
and at fair prices? This requires large capital and efficient, 
systematic management. Is he big enough and strong enough, 
and is his production large enough to enable him to buy mater- 
ials in quantities and at bed rock prices? Is he invariably 
offered nothing but the best at lowest prices ? Has he been a 
buyer of high grade material long enough and does his foreign 
and American experience qualify him to know good materials 
and to shun the inferior even though it may be temporarily 



'popular?' Is his advertising of the kind that inspires confi- 
dence in his integrity and his product because of its sincerity, 
and because it is confined to facts concerning his product, which 
can be substantiated and demonstrated, or is it of the bombas- 
tic type? Does he deal with theories, superlatives and loud 
claims, or things which can be easily demonstrated?" 

» * * 

Around the Lakes 

J. W. Leavitt, the local pathfinder, last Sunday took one of 
the most enjoyable trips that has been reported this season. 
Leavitt, whose hobby in touring is in the nearby highways and 
byways around San Francisco, took his family and A. E. Thei- 
sen, treasurer of the campany, and his family in an Overland 
on the tour around the Spring Valley Lake. 

On ordinary conditions, these roads are most enjoyable, as 
the scenic beauties of this section of California is one of the 
most interesting from the tourist's standpoint that is to be 
enjoyed in the vicinity of San Francisco. Before starting, Lea- 
vitt expected to find the roads in miserable condition after the 
recent hard rains. He was, however, particularly interested in 
noting how the rains had filled up the lakes, which are the 
water supply of San Francisco, and to satisfy his curiosity, 
made the trip. 

In speaking of the trip, Leavitt says : "I was most agreeably 
surprised to find the beautiful condition of the road around the 
lake. At no time did we encounter any mud; a few wet spots 
were to be found, but they had a hard bottom, and the water or 
soft ground did not come over the rubber tire. Outside of these 
three or four places, the rest of the road was in beautiful condi- 
tion, hard, smooth and like a boulevard. It was really a sur- 
prise, and shows that those who enjoy the trip around the lakes 
can make them any time after forty-eight hours of sunshine. 

"Ordinarily, in the summertime, this trip, while most beau- 
tiful, is nothing in comparison to what it is at the present time. 
The foliage and the ground is one mass of radiant green. We 
counted nine different shades of green in the trees, the grass 
and the brush. Combined with the last remnants of the fall au- 
tumn leaves, it made a picture that the camera cannot depict, 
and one that few artists can place upon the canvas. Never in 
all my journeys around the lake, which is a favorite one with 
me, have I seen the country so beautiful, and we were more 
than repaid for the trip. However, I was surprised to find that 
the lakes had not filled up as I had expected. It will take a 
lot more rain to bring the water mark of the lakes up anywhere 
near the standard. While many may be regretting the heavy 
downfall of the last few days, they should be thankful, realizing 
that it is replenishing our water stock that will be a necessity 

the coming summer." 

* * » 

Racing Mercers 

Bert Latham, of the Simplex-Mercer Pacific Coast agency, 
received word from the Mercer factory last week that the three 
Mercer racing cars which are to be driven by Oldfield, De 
Palma and Wishart, are ready for the road, and will be shipped 
to California at least thirty days' before the running of the 
Vanderbilt and Grand Prize races. 

This means that the three Mercer entries for these auto clas- 
sics are a certainty, and that three of the world's greatest drivers 
will be seen at the wheels. This assures six of the fastest cars 
for the big races, and promises well for the interet that the 
East will show in California events. 

The Mercer cars will be under the personal direction of Finlay 
R. Porter and a corps of mechanics who have been through the 
racing game and know every angle of it. 

"Now that it has been definitely decided that the Mercer 
cars are to come West, I intend going into active training," said 
Barney Oldfield. "I of course do not mean by this that I will 
do ten miles of road work and two hours of gymnasium work 
each day, but I will begin to prepare myself for these tests, and 
will be in as good physical condition when the Vanderbilt 
starts as at any time in my life. 

"I think these races will be my farewell to the racing game, 
and it is my greatest ambition to win both of them. It would 
be a fitting exit. Understand, I do not boast that I am going to 
win them. I simply say I hope to. 

"I think, without any doubt, the world's road race record 
vil! be beaten in the Vanderbilt race. The Grand Prize will be 
-onsiderably longer, but I would not be surprised to see a new 
record hung up in this event." 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 24, 1914. 



Living Gardens for the World's Fair 

Transplantation of Full Grown Trees From the Forest to the Fair Grounds— A Delicate 
Problem of Engineering Successfully Solved— Flowers in Myriad Forms 



By Waldemar H. F. N. de Bille. 





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Transplanting full-groivn trees. 

The Exposition site was formerly a great basin of water 
formed by a seawall running east and west along the line of 
what is now the northern boundary of the grounds. When the 
site was finally accepted and President C. C. Moore started the 
machinery of the great dredger, "John W. McMullen," on April 
12, 1912, there were 71 acres of water-covered land to be filled 
in, and more than 3,100,000 cubic yards of silt were hydrau- 
lically pumped in from the bay. This filling in was completed 
not more than one year ago. 

A combination of sand and salt-laden silt lay outstretched 
before the eyes of the landscape engineers, headed by John 
McLaren, when they were brought to the site to make plans 
for the planting of flowers and hedges and trees. Such a com- 
bination would not grow even a blade of grass, and it was for 
the engineers to devise some plan by which the sand could be 
fertilized properly. 

"There is but one solution," said McLaren, and turning to his 
companions he continued : "Let us emulate the example set by 
Mohammed and bring the mountain to us." 

McLaren's Solution. 

Thus was conceived the most daring and absolutely unpre- 
cedented plan of bringing 25,000 cubic yards of soil from a 
point on the Sacramento river seventy miles away to the Expo- 
sition site. When McLaren determinedly spoke of doing this, 
and whimsically recalled Mohammed's mountain, he was not 
far wrong in simile, for 25,000 cubic yards of dirt piled into 
a cube 100 feet square would rise one-half mile into the air and 
its top would be far above the clouds. In all reality, a mount 
of dirt! 

Immediately the engineer corps was called upon for advice 
and a set of plans drawn. Permission was given by the United 
States government to cut away the banks of the Sacramento 
river at Collinsville, and as the huge steam dredges removed 
the earth in great bites it was loaded upon barges and towed 
to the Exposition grounds and there spread by skilled work- 
men over the entire site to a depth of from six to eight inches. 

A Tropical Paradise. 

While the engineers were attending to this feature of the 
work, McLaren, who is Superintendent of Parks of San Fran- 



cisco and creator of the famous Golden Gate Park, was busily 
engaged with a large staff of landscape engineers in planning 
a veritable tropical Paradise. 

Horticulturists in all parts of the world were communicated 
with by cable, and asked to send their choicest specimens of 
the flowers and plants and trees indigenous to their particular 
clime, all of which may be grown in the remarkable climate of 
San Francisco, where flowers bloom the entire year around 
and the daintiest of blossoms may be picked at any time during 
the winter. 

A map of the site was. carefully marked with the position of 
each bed of flowers, line of hedge and most advantageous loca- 
tion for each tree. In the case of these latter, deep holes were 
dug, and these were filled to the brim with the precious soil. 

Nurseries, greenhouses and lath houses were built near 
the site of the drill ground upon which the troops of all nations 
will pass in review daily, and in these were planted hundreds of 
thousands of cuttings and seeds. 

The Color Scheme. 

Then Jules Guerin, Director of Color for the Exposition, ar- 
rived for consultation with McLaren, and explained that in se- 
lecting the flowers only those which would harmonize with the 
general and individual color schemes of the Expositions and 
the buildings must be chosen. 

The plans were then revised, and as Mr. Guerin selected his 
colors for each palace, the flowers which would best harmonize 
with those colors were chosen from the world's collections. 

But most certainly this color scheme would be spoiled com- 
pletely if the flowers were not in full bloom every moment dur- 
ing ten months of the Exposition, including all of the four sea- 
sons. Would it be possible to make them bloom all of the time, 
McLaren was asked. 

His master-scheme was then revealed. By a series of rota- 
tion the engineer has promised that there will never be a minute 
during the year of 1915 when all of the flowers in sight of the 
public will not be in full bloom. 

For every plant growing on the Exposition site there will be 




l jSi^y«','H'»rT 



Colonnade Court of Four Seasons. 

duplicates in the greenhouses, lath-houses and nurseries, and 
when any one of the plants ceases to bloom another, a duplicate 
from the gardens will replace it. 

Keynote of the Plans. 

As immensity is the keynote of the plans of the architects 
building the Exposition, so great numbers play an important 
part in the Garden of Eden plans of the landscape engineers. 

There will be 50 acres of the greenest and most velvety grass 



January 24, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



27 



ever seen outside of America, and that this is not an idle boast, 
the Exposition directors point with pride to the eighteen acres 
now complete. 

A great avenue of thousands of date palms, hundreds of 
which have cost more than $100 each, will lead from one great 
court to another, and a hedge sixty feet high will protect the 
gardens from the dust of the adjacent streets, and this hedge it- 
self is a masterpiece of conception. It will be formed by plac- 
ing large flower-boxes one upon another in such a way that 
beautiful vines — evergreen- — will trail down from them and 
form a continuous wall of living streamers and festoons. 

More than 75,000 geraniums are now growing in the nur- 

r~ - — 



adjoining the Exposition site, and 8,000 rhododendrons have 
been ordered from England and Virginia. An equal number of 
begonias and fuschias and hydrangeas and English laurel will 
delight the eye of the visitor. 

A great orchard has been despoiled of its orange trees, and 
these will bloom for the benfit of the tourist from the icy re- 
gions of the United States, where only the cold storage orange 
is known. To the tourist the great variety and number of 
olive trees will also add to the interest, and 6,000 of Califor- 
nia's own tree, the eucalyptus, will rear their gnarled and 
twisted trunks thirty feet above the grounds. 

The beautiful Fine Arts Palace will be banked with massive 

1 





COPYRIGHT 1913 BYT] 
WNAMMWDft 1NTTRNATONA1 RPOSmOH 



Tower of Cascade and Court o] Abundance. 



series and will be planted on the site in December, 1914. They 
will at that time have attained a growth of from two to three 
feet in height. 

Tens of thousands of acacias are now blooming and being 
boxed to bank the buildings, and these have been selected so 
that the many varieties which bloom at different times provide 
an equal number which will be always in bloom. The acacia 
will be the only blooming tree on the grounds. 

Flowers in Profusion. 

Space has been allotted to the 25,000 veronicas now on hand 
and blooming in Tennessee Hollow on the Presidio Reservation 



green plants and a bank of greenery and vines will trail down 
from a pergola high on the top of the building to the base. All 
of the palaces will receive an appropriate "dressing" of flowers 
and shrubs, in order that the scheme of the exhibits may be ac- 
centuated. 

In the beautiful California canyon, through which flows a 
typical mountain creek over a great waterfall, all of the won- 
derful ferns which grow in the tropics will thrive in the shel- 
tered humidity. The canyon will be artificial, but will present 
all the splendor of a wild mountain gorge. Native grasses, 
•lulbs and flowering annuals — which have never before been 
atalogued in collections — will add to the interest of the Expo- 
sition for scientists and horticulturists. 



28 



San F: 



rancisco 



News Letter 



January 24, 1914. 



THE PLAYERS' CLUB. 
Interesting Dramatic Musical and Social Program Promised. 

The program that the Players' Club is offering for its asso- 
ciate members on Tuesday evening, January 27th, at Sorosis 
Club house promises to be one of the most interesting they 
have ever given. Two plays, "The Bells," by Leopold Lewis, 
and "How He Lied to Her Husband," by Bernard Shaw, will 
be presented. 

Richard Hotaling, the well known clubman, will play the 
leading part of Mathias in "The Bells." This is the part made 
famous by Sir Henry Irving, who played it continuously for 
two score years. It is a role which calls for powerful acting, 
but those who are familiar with Mr. Hotaling's work feel con- 
fident in his ability to portray this difficult character. 

Mr. Hotaling's wide experience has gained for him a pre- 
eminent place among local amateurs. He has appeared in sev- 
eral professional starring engagements, both in this city and in 
Oakland, interpreting the leads in "The Merchant of Venice," 
"Julius Caesar," "Richelieu," "Midsummer Night's Dream" 
and "Hamlet." He has also scored in such comedies as "Mr. 
Hopkinson," "The First Violin," and others. 

In the cast of "The Bells" with Mr. Hotaling will be Mrs. 
Carolyn Green, who won commendation a short time ago with 
her work in "The Pigeon," and Rowena Danhauer, who has 
made herself popular with the Club's audiences by her excellent 
portrayal of character parts. The rehearsals are being con- 
ducted under the personal direction of Reginald Travers, and 
an adequate performance is assured. 

Preceding "The Bells," a very clever one-act satire of Bernard 
Shaw's, entitled "How He Lied to Her Husband," will be pre- 
sented. This is a satire on "Candida," which the Players' Club 
presented on a number of previous occasions, and was used by 
Arnold Daly in vaudeville with no little success. Mrs. Jeannette 
Alferitz, who is cast for "She," is always pleasing. William 
Rainey will play "He," the Arnold Daly part, and Dion Holm 
as "The Husband," rounds out the cast. This is Mr. Holme's 
first appearance with the Players' Club this season; his suc- 
cessful work last summer in The Mission Play at Santa Clara 
will be remembered. 

The Players' Club orchestral trio, consisting of Ernestine 
Bock, Bernice Sternberg and Gertrude Graham will render an 
excellent concert program during the evening. 



WOMAN'S SPHERE AGAIN. 

In one of the big day nurseries of New York City stands a 
beautiful dolls' house. It is more than a house: it is a perfect 
little palace for perfect little queens of dolls. Perhaps it seems 
out of place in the plain, very clean and very sanitary nursery, 
but it is the joy and delight of many little tots of the darkest 
slums. 

Not always was the dolls' house in such uncongenial sur- 
roundings. It was built for a little lady of Fifth avenue — a 
little lady who not only knew nothing of how the other half 
live, but who never suspected the existence of another half. 
She -romped through a joyous childhood, and danced through 
a happy girlhood. Her father's millions brought her everything 
she desired, even to a French count and a French palace — one 
of those, perhaps, where Marie Antoinette once frivoled away 
her days. 

But when she went to live in France, she left behind a mother 
whose life seemed very empty. She wanted to do something 
for others that she might forget self. So she distributed her 
daughter's old toys, and the dolls' house moved to the slums to 
become a never-ending wonder to little tots whose mothers are 
at work all day in big garment factories, and whose fathers are 
in hospital or in jail or- — just forgotten to come home. 

One day it was the birthday of the far-away French countess, 
and her mother paid a visit to the settlement house. Her limou- 
sine had difficulty getting through the crowded, noisy, evil- 
smelling streets, but the mother was deep in memories of the 
past, and doubtless did not notice. She begged the busy ma- 
tron of the nursery to let her see the dolls' house and scatter 
a few roses, which she had brought with her, and shed a few 
tears. And because her generous checks helped to solve many 
problems of the neighborhood, and because the matron was 
kind and sympathetic, our lady was urged to go as far as she 
liked. 

The little slumites were delighted, and crowded eagerly 



around, for even the beautiful dolls' house paled beside so 
beautiful a lady. 

"And are all these children orphans?" she asked. 

"Oh, no," answered the matron; "their mothers are at work." 

Thereupon the lovely lady shook off her memories and her 
sorrows and dried her eyes, and gave voice to her principles : 

"I don't believe in this at all! Woman's sphere is in the 
home! Let her work out her career at her own fireside. Let 
her mend and sew, if necessary, and do without feathers and 
finery. But let her devote her life to her children and teach 
them to grow up good citizens. It would be far, far better than 
leaving them to charitable institutions." 

So saying, she got bridling into her limousine, and drove 
away, still too busy with her thoughts — this time of the present 
— to notice those dark and dreary streets. 

Marie Antoinette, wasn't it, who said: "Why should any one 
starve, when such nice little cakes can be bought for five cen- 
times apiece?" — From Women's Stories. 

SUMMONS. 
Justices' Court, F No. 33 
IN THE JUSTICES' COURT OP THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN 

FRANCISCO, STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 
EDWARD W. GUNTHER, -\ Action brought in the Justices' Court 

Plaintiff I ln the clty and County of San Fran- 

E. M. CHADBOURNE, ( Cisco, and Complaint filed in the office 

Defendant J of Clerk of said Court. 

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA TO E. M. CHAD- 
BOURNE. 

YOU ARE HEREBY DIRECTED to appear in action Drought against 
you by the above named Plaintiff in the Justices' Court of the City and 
County of San Francisco, and to answer to the complaint filed therein: 
within five days (exclusive of the day of'service) after the service on you 
of this summons, if served within this County, otherwise within twenty 
days. 

And you are hereby notified that unless you appear and answer as above 
required the said plaintiff will take judgment for any money or damages 
demanded in the Complaint, as arising upon contract, or plaintiff will 
apply to the Court for any other relief demanded in the Complaint. 

This action has been assigned, and you are directed to appear before 
Bernard J. Flood, Esq., one of the Justices of said Court, at his office. 
City Hall, Market street, between 8th and 9th streets, in said City and 
County. 

Make legal service and due return hereon: By order of the Presiding Jus- 
tice of the Peace of the City and County of San Francisco. 

Given under my hand this December 13. 1913. 
EDWARD W. GUNTHER, 
Law and Collection Office, 
Kohl Building, Fifth Floor. 
Cor. Montgomery and California Sts. 

San Francisco. ROBERT W. DENNIS. Justices' Clerk 

Attorney for Plaintiff. By J. F. COLLINS. Deputy Clerk 

APPLICATION OF GUARDIAN FOR LEAVE TO MORTGAGE REAL ESTATE 

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA, IN AND 

FOR THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
No. 11690. Dept. 10. 

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE AND GUARDIANSHIP OF ROB- 
ERT FRANCIS ATKINS. A MINOR. 

Upon reading the verified petition filed herein of Etta M. Blake, the 
guardian of the person and estate of Robert Francis Atkins, a minor, 
praying for an order permitting her to mortgage the property herein and 
therein described, and good cause appearing therefor 

It is ordered that all persons interested in said estate appear before the 
above-entitled Court, at the courtroom of Dept. 10 thereof, situate a1 
Room 510. in the City Hall located at No. 1231 south side of Market street 
in the City and County of San Francisco. State of California, dii 
Monday, the 9th day of February. 1014. at the hour of ten o'clock a. m. 
of said day, then and there to show cause if any they have why the realty 
described herein and in the petition on file herein should not be mortgaged 
for the sum of Six Thousand Dollars ($6,000). or for such lesser amount 
as to the court may seem meet; said realty being particularly des< rlbed 
as follows: 

All that certain lot. piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in 
the City and County of San Francisco. State of Call fornla, and particularly 
bounded and described as follows: 

COMMENCING at a point on the northerly line of Pine street, distant 

thereon 32 feet and 6 inches westerly from the westerly line of J 

street; running thence westerly and along said northerly line Of Pine 
street -7 feet and G Inches: thence at a right angle northerly 85 feet: 
thence at a right angle easterly 27 feet and G inches: thence at a right 
angle southerly 85 feet to the northerly line of Pine street and the point 
of commencement. Heing a part of 50 Vara Lot No. las:'. 

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED That this Order to show Cause be pub- 
lished in the San Francisco News Letter, a newspaper of general --ircula- 
tlon published in the City and County of San Frannsco, state of Cali- 
fornia- 
Reference is hereby made to said petition of said guardian on file herein 
for further particulars. 

Dated: January 8th. 1914. 
THOS, F. GRAHAM. Judge. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
Joshua Hendy Iron Works. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Joshua Hendy 
Iron Works will be held at the office of the corporation, No. 75 Fremont 
street, San Francisco. California, on TUESDAY, the 10th day of February. 
1914, at the hour of 10 o'clock A. M.. for the purpose of electing a Board 
of Directors to serve for the ensuing year, and for ttie transaction of such 
other business as may come before the meeting. 

CHARLES C. GARDNER, Secretary. 
Office — No. 75 Fremont St., San Francisco Cal. 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER 



37-45 First Street Phone Sutter 223C 

Private Exchange Connectlnc All Departments 



January 24, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



29 



PSYCHOLOGY OF FIGHTING. 
University of California Lecture Courses on Novel Subjects. 

The University of California has begun the work of the new 
year. The year's attendance will be about 5,375, or about 700 
more than for the previous year. Inclusive of the summer ses- 
sion, the total for the year will exceed 7,500. 

A notable feature of the new term is the presence, for a half 
year, of the distinguished English historian and archaeologist, 
John L. Myres, Wykeham Professor of Ancient History in the 
University of Oxford, England. Professor Myres has come to 
California for this half year as Sather professor. Mrs. Sather 
gave $120,000 for the endowment of the Sather Professorship 
of Classical Literature. It is planned to devote the income of 
this endowment to bringing to California a series of distin- 
guished European or American scholars, for a half year or a 
year at a time, instead of making a permanent appointment to 
the chair. Through his excavations in Cyprus and elsewhere 
in Mediterranean lands, Professor Myres has made important 
additions to the world's knowledge of the civilization that 
flourished on the islands and the coasts of the Mediterranean 
before Rome and Athens had begun. 

Two other distinguished strangers who will come to the Uni- 
versity during the spring are Lloyd William Stephenson, of the 
United States Geological Survey, who comes as acting professor 
of Palaeontology, and Henry F. Osborn, Research Professor in 
Columbia University and President of the American Museum 
of Natural History in New York, who will come to Berkeley in 
February as Hitchcock lecturer. Professor Osborn, who is one 
of the most eminent of palaeontologists, is to lecture on "Men 
of the Old Stone Age in Europe." The Hitchcock lectures con- 
stitute a series given each year by a different scholar. These 
lectures usually appear afterwards in book form. An endow- 
ment created by Charles M. Hitchcock supports these annual 
lectures. 

Among new courses given this term for the first time are 
courses in "Textile Raw Materials," "The Elements of Fores- 
try," "The Supervision of Domestic Art — a Course for Teach- 
ers," "Social Insurance," "The Organization of Labor," "In- 
dustrial and Agricultural Labor Problems in California" — this 
is to be given by Professor Carleton H. Parker, secretary of the 
California Immigration Commission, "The Development of 
California Literature" — this is to be given by Professor Wm. 
Dallam Armes, — "German Art in the Nineteenth Century in its 
Relation to Literary Movements," "The Dawn of History," 
"Greek History," and "Herodotus" — these three courses to be 
given by Professor Myres; a course to train musicians for the 
conducting of orchestral or choral work — this is to be given by 
Professor Charles L. Seeger, head of the Department of 
Music; and a course by Professor George M. Stratton on "The 
Psychology of Fighting, with Special Reference to War and 
Peace." 



FOREST NOTES. 



The American Forestry Association has members in every 
State in the union, in every province in Canada, and in every 
civilized and semi-civilized country in the world. 

Makers of phonographs are aiming to use wood instead of 
metal in all parts of the instrument where this is possible, in 
order to increase the mellowness of the tone. 

On the Pocatello forest, Idaho, 230,000 trees were planted 
during the past year, and almost half a million in the past three 
years, fully three-fourths of which are alive and doing well. 

Experiments in the use of aspen for shingles show that the 
shingles do not check in seasoning, and that they turn water 
satisfactorily, but that they are too easily broken in handling. 

There are somewhat more than 500 recognized tree species 
in the United States, of which about 100 are commercially im- 
portant for timber. Of the 500 recognized species. 300 are 
represented in the government's newly acquired Appalachian 
forests. All American species, except a very few subtropical 
ones on the Florida keys and in extreme southern Texas, are 
to be found in one or another of the national forests. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. iA<t*«tisrn»t>t> 



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ITS UNRIVALED PURITY AND EXCELLENCE, 
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WM. LANAHAN & SON, Baltimore, Md. 



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2 874 Market Street San Francisco «* 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 24, 1914. 




The New Poodle Dog 




HOTEL 

and 

RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: Franklin 2980 




MAIS0N DOREE 

HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

151-157 Ellis Street 47 Glasgow Street 

Phone Douglas 1040 

TRY OUR SPECIAL 

SOc 4-COURSE QUICK LUNCHEON 

With Claret, or Glass of Beer, Tea or Coffee 

From 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. 

OUR SI. 00 DINNERS ARE, POSITIVELY 
THE BEST IN TOWN 



BLANCO'S 



O'Farrell and Larkin 
Streets 



Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without seeing the 
finest cafe in America 



Phones 



Sutter 1672 
Home C 8970 
Home C 4781, Hotel 



Cyril Arnantor. 
Henry Rlttman 
C. Lahederne 



NEW DELMONICO'S 

(FORMERLY MAISON TORTONI) 
RESTAURANT AND HOTEL NOW OPEN 

Best Frtnch Dinner In the City with Wine. $i.oe. Benquet Halls and Private 

Dining Roomi. Music Every Evening 
882 Geary Street San Francisco 



J. Berfu 



C. Mailhebuau 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old POODLE DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT EVERY EVENING 

415-421 Bulb St.. Sin Francisco (Above Rears?) Exchisie. Douilai24ll 



MR. PROPERTY OWNER 

Have you not always some slight repairs? Stopped 
basins, broken window cords, electrical repair work? 
We will assume all your repairs at a small monthly 
rate. Our representative will call at your request 

Phoenix Repair Company 

Nevada Bank Bldg., 14 Montgomery St. Phone Douglas 822 




Forty Per Cent of the Gold Output. 

The Hindu revolt in South Africa complicated by threats of 
a universal industrial strike constitute a situation that threatens 
derangement of business and finance all over the world, for 
such is the complexity of international relations. In a word, 
the annual production of gold for 1913 was $455,000,000, of 
which the mines in the Transvaal contributed $190,000,000. If, 
then, the production of gold on the Rand is stopped by a strike, 
it cuts off nearly 40 per cent of the world's supply of gold, and 
the loss is certain to cause material financial derangement 
while it lasts. 

Late reports, however, indicate that the government of the 
South African Union is taking strong measures to preserve or- 
der, and a late despatch gives these particulars: 

"There have been native riots in mines at Jagersfontein, 
though reports of the place having been sacked are believed to 
be purely sensational. East Indians, however, have declined 
to continue their agitation in the circumstances, and Mr. Gandhi 
has announced that as in case of the Rand strike last year they 
will not embarrass the government during the present disturb- 
ances. The cabinet, which is sitting in Pretoria, has acted 
with decision, and the Gazette prints the proclamations — one 
calling out the citizen forces of Transvaal, the second calling 
out the Burgher reserves, and the third prohibiting the sale 
and transport of arms. Mobilization of citizen forces is taking 
place, and Pretoria has been placed under their guard. Simul- 
taneously Colin Wade, Labor member of the Germiston Coun- 
cil, and Mr. Waterston, secretary of the South African Labor 
party, have been arrested. The wildest reports are, of course, 
to be heard everywhere, but the situation is not yet out of hand, 
and it is by no means certain that either Natal or the Cape will 
throw their lot in with the strikers." 



The Anglo French Entente. 

The celebrated understanding — entente, in diplomatic lan- 
guage — that exists between England and France, although 
scarcely amounting to a treaty of alliance for mutual defense, 
appears to answer that purpose pretty well, and has a binding 
quality doubtless due to reciprocal interests of self-protection. 
Of course, the entente is directed against Germany, which, for 
one reason or another, has come to be regarded in France and 
England as the common enemy. 

As indicative of French sentiment in this regard, the London 
Chronicle had an interview with Josef Cailleaux in his office 
in the Louvre. The redoubtable minister of finance, who is 
described as being at present the least popular man in France, 
began by assuring his visitor of his loyalty to the entente. So 
many untrue statements had been made about him lately, he 
declared, in his own country that he would not profess to be 
surprised that an echo of them had found its way into the 
English press. Not only was he a supporter of the entente, he 
declared, but it was his wish to see it developed and strength- 
ened in every way. The fact was that, like Mr. Lloyd George, 
it was to him inconceivable that the two great democracies of 
Western Europe should ever again depart from the path of 
friendship. Explaining the present financial position of France 
respecting the deficit, he said that he did not think that country 
had reached the limit of taxation, but he did think that the poor 
were taxed out of proportion, being more heavily taxed than 
the English poor, whilst the rich were less heavily taxed than 
the English rich. One of the great financial reforms he had in 
view was an approximation of the French income tax to the 
income tax in the United Kingdom. If this were passed by the 
Senate, it would mean an additional revenue of 150,000,000 
francs a year. In the meantime it was his intention to resort to 
short term treasury bonds." 



Calls the Monroe Doctrine Obsolete. 

Professor Bingham, of Yale, has written for a Berlin news- 
paper an explanation of his belief that the Monroe Doctrine is 



January 24, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



obsolete, and he hints at a combination or an understanding be- 
tween Japan and the South American Republics to compel the 
United States to abandon this long cherished rule of our for- 
eign diplomacy. He writes: 

" 'The writing on the wall' — I will not say that a Mongolian 
hand has shaped the letters ! Yet it may safely be averred that 
many thoughtful minds see in South America the crucible in 
which Latin, Indian and Asiatic blood are to be closely inter- 
mingled. The leading Indian inhabitants of Peru, Bolivia, 
Ecuador and Colombia, according to an eminent anthropologist, 
so closely resemble the natives of Northern Asia that the hy- 
pothesis of South America being originally colonized by Asi- 
atics assumes an air of plausibility. It is at present quite prob- 
able that this colonization is actively going on. One thing is 
certain. The Mongol question in South America has reached a 
critical stage. The position Brazil has taken with regard to 
Japanese immigration is exactly opposite to that taken by 
California. Argentina actually welcomes the Japanese, and 
these immigrants are so numerous that the Japanese govern- 
ment has subsidized a direct line of steamships by the Cape of 
Good Hope route. Another Japanese line passes by way of 
Honolulu to the west coast of South America." 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



Church of England Perils. 

The Bishop of Oxford, in a letter to the London Times, calls 
attention to the perils that assail the church of England because 
its membership is split up in three sharply opposed sections. 
He explains: 

"I mean that the critical school is maintaining that it is le- 
gitimate for a clergyman to hold his official position while re- 
pudiating in his published writings the miracles in which he 
must affirm his belief each time he says the creed. The ex- 
treme school among those who specially value the name of 
Catholic seems to be adopting a position from which the famil- 
iar views of evangelical churchmen must be pronounced 
strictly heretical. The evangelical portion of the church, in its 
zeal for union among Protestants, is giving its approval to 'open 
communion' at Kikuyu, in part supporting the proposal of the 
conference at the close of which this communion was cele- 
brated." 

But it may be pointed out that these variations or differences 
of opinion have existed within the Anglican church for more 
than half a century, and there is no reason to believe that they 
are more acute now than they have been for a considerable per- 
iod." 



THE SKETCH CLUB EXHIBITION. 

The Sketch Club of San Francisco is to entertain in its gal- 
lery a very important exhibition of lithographs by members of 
the Senefelder Club of London. Since the invention of litho- 
graphy by Aloys Senefelder (1771-1834) no single influence 
in developing interest in this art has exceeded that of the Sene- 
felder Club. No previous work of that organization has been 
seen in America with the exception of an exhibition held in 
Philadelphia in 1911, and one about to take place at the Car- 
negie Institute in Pittsburg. 

Among the many artists of note whose work will be shown 
in the coming exhibition at the Sketch Club are Joseph Pennell, 
McClure Hamilton. John Cooley. F. Ernest Jackson, Spencer 
Pryse and D. A. Wehrschmidt. The President of the Sene- 
felder Club is Joseph Pennell, who will be remembered in San 
Francisco for his very remarkable and interesting series of 
drawings and etchings of the city of San Francisco and the 
Panama Canal. A number of the orints to be shown here were 
seen for the first time in London in November of this vear at 
the annual exhibition of the Senefelder Club, from which a 
large number of purchases were made by the British govern- 
ment for the National Gallery. 

The art lovers of San Francisco are extremely fortunate in 
having this opportunity to see so fine a collection of prints 
produced in a medium in which artists of such eminence as 
Whistler, Le Gros. Fantin Latour, Manet and many others 
have found expression. 

The exhibition will be open from January 24th to Feb- 
ruary 8th, the prints to be on view daily, including Sundays, 
from noon until 6 p. m. A private view and reception on the 
evening of January 24th at the gallery of the Sketch Club, 
1373 Post street, will be held. 



SNELL SEMINARY 

Has Moved lo 

2237 PIEDMONT AVE., BERKELEY 

Boarding and day School. 
Founded 1874. From pri- 
mary to college entrance, 

ADELAIDE SMITH 

PRINCIPAL 



Hitchcock Military Academy 

SAN RAFAEL, CAL. 

THE ONLY SCHOOL IN THE WEST HAVING 
SEPARATE ROOMS FOR EACH BOY 

Accredited; Large Campus Gymnasium, Indoor 
Rifle Range.Cadets may enter any time of the 
year. Summer camp on Eel River, June to 
August. 

Principals 
REX W. SHERER S. J. HALLEY 



Miss Harker's School pa ^o^Ja° 

Boarding and Day School lor Girls. Certificate admits to 
Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith and Mills. 
Intermediate and primary departments. Great attention given 
to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home Economics. Special nurst 
for younger children. Ninth year. 

Catalogue upon application. 



A. W. Baft 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1626 California Street 



Life CIlHH 

Day and Night 



Illustrating 
Sketchinr 
Painting 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavla. Telephone Park 2940. 

DENTISTS. 
W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgeon of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy St., now at room 403 
West bank Building, corner Ellis and Market. 

ATTORNEYS- AT- LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney -a t-lAw. Chronicle Building, San Fran~ 
Cisco. Tel. Douglas 217fi. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dr. R. T. Leaner, Surgeon Chiropodist, formerly of 6 Geary street; 
removes corns entirely whole — painless — without knife. Bunions and in- 
growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 212-214 West- 
bank Bldg.. 830 Market SL Tel. Kearny 3578. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public and Pension Attorney. All legal 
papers drawn up accurately. 217 Montgomery SL, above Bu?h, San Fran- 
cisco. Cal. Phone Douglas S01. 



Ttltphoia Kearny i«6i Private Exchange Connecting All Warehouse* 

SAN FRANCISCO WAREHOUSE CO. 

Warehousemen Forwarding Agents Distributors Public Weighers 

Spar Trick Coaarctiool Wit* All Rtilrotd* 

Main Office: 62S-647 Third Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 24, 1914. 




"Say, pa, what were those quills they used to write 

with?" "Things they took from the pinions of one goose to 
spread the opinions of another," replied pa, as he refilled his 
fountain pen. — Life. 

Teacher — Now, children, can you tell me what are the 

national flowers of England? Class — Roses. Teacher — And 
France? Class — Lilies. Teacher — And Spain? (Silence for 
a minute, then small voice at back of the schoolroom) — "Bull- 
rushes, ma'am." — Life. 

The parting from brother 

Was tearful and sad. 
"Be good!" whispered mother; 
"Make good!" counseled dad. 

— Louisville Courier-Journal. 

A humorous reference to Lord Strathclyde, the Lord 

Justice-General of Scotland, whose new title obscures the bet- 
ter known name of Mr. Ure, was made at Edinburgh by Lord 
Rosebery when he formally dedicated to the city his gift of 
Lady Stair's house, which is used as a museum. "I have con- 
stantly pointed out to him privately," said Lord Rosebery, "that 
I am convinced that a daily speech of at least an hour is as 
necessary to his digestion as grit is to that of a grouse. I am 
sincerely apprehensive of the effect on his health, in which we 
are so much interested, of the enforced and compulsory silence 
to which he is at present relegated.- — Ex. 

"I just adore caviar." "Isn't he a 

swell singer!" — Columbia Jester. 

Innocent Old Lady — I hear a great 

deal about this tango tea nowadays. 
How much is it a pound?" — Life. 

"What's most liable to get broke 

about your automobile?" "The owner," 
replied Mr. Chuggins. — Washington Star. 



"You know, Dorothy, these biscuits of yours," he began, 

as he helped himself to the seventh. "Yes?" said his wife, 
with a weary smile. "Ah, they're nothing like mother's." "No?" 
The smile was gone. "No, not a bit. You see, mother's were 
heavy and gave me dyspepsia, while yours are as light as a 
feather, and I can eat about — why, what's the matter, Doro- 
thy?" She had fainted. — Kate Field's Washington. 

The palm for brevity in speech should be awarded to a 

marine who testified about the explosion of a gun on a war 
vessel — an explosion which had sent him to the hospital for 
some months. "Please give your version of the explosion," he 
was asked. "Well," he said, "I was standing beside the gun; 
there was an awful racket and the doctor said: 'Sit up, and take 
this.' " — Everybody's. 

Dr. Lyman Abbott, at a luncheon at the Colony Club in 

New York, was good humoredly arguing the suffrage question 
with a prominent suffragette. "Now, doctor," said the suffra- 
gette, "there's one thing you must admit. A woman doesn't 
grow warped and hideous so quickly as a man. Her mind 
keeps younger and fresher." "Well, no wonder," Dr. Abbott 
retorted. "Look how often she changes it!" — New York In- 
dependent. 



During the last two weeks a wonderful transformation 

has taken place at the Tait-Zinkand Cafe. Patrons now dine 
in a replica of the Festival Hall of the Temple of Arbaces in 
Ancient Pompeii — amid scenes that fairly vibrate with the gran- 
deur and luxury of the half Grecian, half Roman city that was 
so suddenly and cruelly buried by the ashes of Vesuvius in 
69 A. D. The superior excellence of the fifty cent luncheon that 
is served here among the beautiful scenes and tragic memories 
of the past — enhanced by the selected music that lends life 
and rhythm to its fascinating atmosphere — are sure to make the 
attractions of Tait-Zinkand Cafe irresistible to all lovers of the 
novel, the beautiful and the delicious, for many months to come. 



Your Telephone Expert 



"I am out of politics for good," an- 
nounced the political boss. "Whose?" 
questioned the green reporter. — Cincin- 
nati Enquirer. 

Prof. — A fool can ask more ques- 
tions than a wise man can answer. Stude. 
— No wonder so many of us flunk in our 
exams ! — Penn State Froth. 

Little Willie — What is a lawyer, 

pa? Pa — A lawyer, my son, is a man 
who induces two other men to strip for a 
fight, and then runs off with their clothes. 
— Crescent. 

"Your shavin' powder ain't no 

good," said Rustic Simplicissimus to the 
drug clerk; "I put some on my face last 
night, and the hair is longer than ever." 
— Texas Coyote. 

Judge — Describe what passed be- 
tween you in the quarrel with your wife. 
Man on Stand — The plates were regular 
dinner size, your honor, and the teapot 
had a broken spout. — Boston Transcript. 

"Who is this Dean Swift they are 

talking about?" a parvenu once said to 
Lady Biilwer; "I should like to invite him 
to my receptions." "Alas, madam," re- 
plied Lady Bulwer, "the Dean has done 
something that has shut him out of so- 
ciety." "Dear me, what was that?" 
"Well, about a hundred years ago he 
died." — Boston Transcript. 




THE switchboard operator who answers your 
telephone call has a mission in life— her mis- 
sion is to serve you. She has at her finger 
tips the most modern telephone equipment in the 
world. Quickness, accuracy and courtesy are her 
essential qualifications. 

Frequently she is called upon to act quickly in 
emergencies when courage and presence of mind 
are required. 

It is as essential to good telephone service 
that each Bell Telephone operator should be 
healthy and happy as it is that every part of the 
equipment of that great inter-communicating 
system should be in good working order. 

In the Bell system, 70,000 operators make 
connections which furnish clear tracks for 
26,000,000 telephone talks each day. 

Every Bell Telephone is 
a Long Distance Station 



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Standard Pullman and Tourist Sleeping Cars. Dining Car to 
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The Exposition Line — 1915 



AMATA 



A Novel By 

SP if s* 



LOUISE E. TABER 
Jiuthor of ' <c Che Flame" . 

Began in the January number of the OVERLAND 
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is laid in San Mateo, a fashionable country residence 
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With the New Year, OVERLAND MONTHLY will 
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Address 

OVERLAND MONTHLY 

21 SUTTER ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



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Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




Vol. LXXXVII 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, January 31, 1914 



No. 5 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 21 Sutter Street, San Francisco; Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — S. L. Carman, representative, 156 Fifth Ave. 

Chicago Office — Jno. A. Tenney, 452 Peoples Gas Building, Chicago. 

Boston Office — Charles S. Parr, 525 Tremont Temple. 

London Office— George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Matter intended for publication in the current number of the SAN 
FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER should 

be sent to the office not later than 5 p. m. Wednesday. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) — 1 year, $4.00; 6 months, $2.25. 
Foreign — 1 year, $6.00; 6 months, $3.25. 

Huerta must go. 

A blast from old Boreas is dry and welcome after all that 

rain. 

The latest battleship cost $21,000,000. In ten years it 

will be junk. 

New York wants Goethalls for police commissioner. 

They have tried nearly everybody else. 

Hunter's Point is inevitably indicated as the best site 

for drydocks capable of holding the big battleships. 

"He that will not work, neither shall he eat" is the an- 
cient and just rule applied in the administration of the fund for 
the relief of the unemployed. 

The Federal Department of Agriculture is preparing to 

organize boys' pigs' clubs to eat the product of the boy's corn 
clubs. This is the house that Jack built. 

■ Oakland is preparing to regulate street traffic in a scien- 
tific way with the help of semaphores and a honking bagpipe 
operated by a policeman. 

— —The government weather bureau in Washington thinks it 
necessary to explain that its work is not "occult." It is hard to 
say whether this is an excuse or an apology. 

Last weeks' returns on partisan registration showed 41,- 

184 Republican, 26,213 Progressives and 17,837 Democrats, 
with 10,404 unaffiliated. It's anybody's race. 

The most astonishing candidacy just now in evidence is 

that of a reformed train robber, who is running for Governor of 
Oklahoma, with apparently excellent chances of success. 

The mysterious headline in a Sacramento paper, "Pair 

Married at Bay" does not indicate a wedding at pistol point, but 
merely that the couple had come to San Francisco for the 
ceremony. 

Be sure your jokes will find you out. Now. there is Sena- 
tor Sanford of Mendocino, who invented the name of a new 
State of South Cafeteria. How do you suppose Sanford would 
run for Governor on the other side of Tehachapi ? 

The Portland, Ore., unemployed have found Easy street. 

The Health Department discovered a smallpox case in the 
tabernacle where a thousand men are housed, and by conse- 
quence, the place is quarantined, and the internes have their 
meals brought to them. 



The magnitude of the flood control problem may be esti- 
mated from the fact that the volume of water now rushing to 
the ocean across the Yolo basin is several times greater than 
that carried by the Sacramento River. That is to say, the over- 
flow is many times greater than the river. 

While administering the Pasteur serum treatment for 

rabies, a surgeon in Redlands, San Bernardino County, allowed 
the hypodermic needle to slip and pierced his own finger. He 
is now in doubt whether he has given himself rabies or blood 
poisoning. These are the medical mysteries of inoculation. 

San Mateo County has mobilized "a flying squad" of 

twenty-five men to repel the invading mosquito. This does not 
mean that an aviation corps has been organized, but merely that 
the gang is building levees to fence the county against the 
threatened invasion. The mosquito, it seems, is an amphibious 
pest. 

— : — A gay old sport from Oklahoma, who was taking a whirl 
in the night life of San Francisco, woke up oblivious next day 
in Santa Clara, without knowing how he got there. He ex- 
plained in the hospital that he did not drink, but had been 
drugged with a piece of pie. Look not on the pie when it is red 
in the face. 

Alden Anderson, formerly head of the State Banking 

Department, and himself a banker of note, says the business 
outlook was never better in California. Mr. Anderson is not 
only familiar with financial conditions, but is likewise in touch 
with the producers, being himself an extensive fruit grower 
and shipper. 

The navigators say that if the irrigators have their way, 

the thirsty fields will swallow all the water in California, and 
the rivers will go dry. The irrigators on the other hand insist 
that the navigators waste oceans of perfectly good water which 
in winter overflows the delta. It appears in the last resort to be 
a question of water in the wrong place. 

-The women of Alameda County are not so easily put off 

the track as the men. The County Tax Association has had 
several sessions with the Board of Supervisors without getting 
any sort of satisfaction. It was the official policy to say noth- 
ing and saw wood. But the other day the Board tried this plan 
on a committee of determined women who demanded definite 
pledges of economy, and announced that they would come 
every day until they got them. 

Extremes of human nature are illustrated by the fact 

that some shiftless loafers among the unemployed sold for 
twenty-five cents their tickets assigning them to work. So we 
find at one end of the scale men so worthless that they sell an 
opportunity of employment for whisky money, while at the 
other end we see men so eager to get any sort of honest work 
that they are willing to pay for the chance at a percentage of 
the moderate wage. 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 31, 1914. 





E/DITOR.IAL 



Dealing With the 
Professional Hobo. 



The city of Sacramento has been 
experimenting in the use of scientific 
methods for handling the problem 
of support for the unemployed, and 
it may be admitted that the plan has met with rather indifferent 
success, not through any fault of the officials in charge, but 
rather by reason of the natural perversity of the hobo and his 
ingrained and constitutional objection to work. 

Among other devices employed to systemize the work, the 
authorities instituted a card index system to keep track of the 
unemployed and classify their capabilities. It was an ad- 
mirable idea, b it it was based on the violent assumption that 
all the card holders really and honestly were in search of work. 
It worked splendidly for those who sincerely desired any sort 
of honorable employment, but unfortunately there was a con- 
siderable residuum of the shiftless who wanted nothing of the 
sort, and for whom the existing conditions were chiefly useful 
as an excuse to beg. 

The municipal employment agent explains how the plan 
works with people of that sort when he says that the card sys- 
tem has given the professional loafers among the unemployed 
just the excuse they have been looking for to avoid work. They 
come to my office now, secure a card, and then make for the 
residence district to beg on the strength of their credentials. 
As for keeping the card punched daily, as they are required 
to do, why, you couldn't keep them away from the office with 
dynamite. They come in the first thing in the morning, get their 
cards punched, and then they are free to hustle for food and 
alms for the remainder of the day." 

So we are given to learn that the cards issued on behalf of 
the city government are used as municipal credentials, and a 
charter for professional beggary. Backed by some ingenious 
hard luck story, the card supplies an official passport and intro- 
duction to work on the sympathies of charitable people. Un- 
der the old plan the municipal agent for the most part knew his 
men and so was able to sift the deserving from the undeserving. 
When an order came in from an employer, he was able to fill 
it with selected men who he knew would do the work in a satis- 
factory way. But under the card index system the assignment 
of work is regulated by rotation, and the man who stands next 
in order on the list is assigned to the job regardless of his fit- 
ness. The result is that when a habitual loafer is sent on the 
job he gives a black eye to the whole body of the unemployed, 
and the disgusted employer refuses to have anything more to do 
with this plan of relief. 

The system has its amusing as well as its disconcerting fea- 
tures. Part of the plan is to give the preference wherever pos- 
sible to married men, and obviouly this preference was actu- 
ated by motives of humanity, but it seems to have acted in a 
fashion not expected by its proponents, because numbers of 
the professionals at once acquired impromptu and imaginary 
families located somewhere in the dim background, but natu- 
rally not immediately available for official inspection. These 
hypothetical families had to be taken on trust or denied exist- 
ence with a flat official foot. One old beggar that had cadged 
for a living around Sacramento for years, told the municipal 
agent that he had a starving wife and four children somewhere 
in the vague environment. It was very sudden — this unex- 
pected and distressed family — but it did not work, and still 
belongs to the land of dreams. 
These are some of the disconcerting snags encountered by a 



scientific system for relieving the unemployed. They are more 
annoying than serious, but they serve in considerable measure 
to hamper the fulfillment of the humane plans for the relief 
of the deserving unemployed. 

W 

One thing and perhaps the only 
Conflicting Problems thing developed or settled by the 
Of River Control. recent State conference on inland 

waterways was the important diver- 
sity of interests met together in an honest endeavor for unifica- 
tion, and we may hope compromise. This diversity and natural 
conflict is indicated not obscurely by the name adopted for the 
organization, which reads like a political platform or the title 
of an act seeking to indicate all the subjects and objects there- 
in treated. In some parts of the State there is too much water, 
as for instance in the delta region of the rivers and the lower 
areas of the Sacramento Valley. In other regions, as in the 
southern San Joaquin Valley, there is even now no surplus of 
water for irrigation and none available for navigation except 
in the months of early summer, when the snow in the mountains 
is melting. In that section, the irrigation interest is paramount. 
They can get along very well without navigation, but they can- 
not exist without water to irrigate their farms and orchards. 

In the delta region, however, and in the general neighborhood 
of Sacramento and Stockton, there is too much water in winter, 
and always the danger of floods impends. John P. Irish, of 
Stockton, has forwarded to the State Reclamation Board a pro- 
test on behalf of the Delta Association against the project of 
certain irrigating communities to turn the King's River into 
the San Joaquin River, a measure which Mr. Irish declares 
would seriously increase the danger of floods in the delta coun- 
try. Inland navigation is a most important factor in the pros- 
perity of Sacramento and Stockton, but it is complicated by the 
problem of flood prevention in seasons of heavy rainfall. So 
imminent is this problem that V. S. McClatchy, addressing the 
conference on behalf of Sacramento, insisted that the most 
pressing of all the measures under consideration was the con- 
struction of a by-pass or supplementary channel to carry off the 
surplus water in winter. Mr. McClatchy did not think much 
of the comprehensive plan advocated by Senator Newlands, 
who proposes to handle all three problems of navigation, irri- 
gation and flood prevention by the construction of great storage 
reservoirs in the mountains to hold up the winter precipitation 
and regulate the flow in summer. Mr. McClatchy is convinced 
that no system of reservations could be made adequate to hold 
in check the tremendous rainfall in the mountains during a 
winter like the present. 

Again, Frank H. Short, of Fresno, declares that the only plan 
by which inland navigation can be made available for the 
southwestern San Joaquin Valley is by means of a system of 
artificial canals, and that to insist on a sufficient flow in the 
natural river channels all the year around would disastrously 
limit the supply of water available for irrigation. No doubt 
Mr. Short knows whereof he speaks. 

From this brief consideration of the prevailing conflict of 
ideas, propositions and objects, it will be seen that Central Cali- 
fornia, and especially the great interior valley extending from 
Redding on the north to Bakersfield in the south, are face to 
face with a series of imminent problems that will require the 
wisest statesmanship to reconcile, compromise and adjust. 



January 31, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



Fish Commission 
Machine. 



John R. Cronin, now of Stockton, 
formerly a member of the Assem- 
bly, representing Solano County, has 
brought suit to test the validity of 
the fishing license law of last session. The suit is brought on 
behalf of the market fishermen on the Sacramento River, who 
pay $60 a year, but the test case covers likewise the validity or 
otherwise of the law which imposes an annual license tax of $1 
on those who fish as amateur devotees of the sport. 

The suit is based on the effect and meaning of a Constitu- 
tional amendment adopted in 1910 which provides that the peo- 
ple shall have the absolute right to fish on or from any State 
lands, and that no laws shall be passed making this a crime, pro- 
vided "that the legislature may, by statute, provide for the sea- 
son when and the conditions under which the different species 
of fish may be taken." 

Cronin contends that, in effect, the license law tends to nullify 
an express provision of the State Constitution, and is therefore 
invalid. The Fish and Game Commission expected to add $200,- 
000 to their revenues from the fishing license tax. The com- 
mission already has an income in excess of $100,000 obtained 
from the hunters' license tax, and this is chiefly used to main- 
tain an expensive retinue of game wardens constituting an ac- 
tive political machine, with centers of activity in nearly every 
county of California. To strengthen and solidify this machine 
the commission had already begun to spend the expected in- 
come from the new license tax by increasing the salaries of the 
wardens. The commission kept a strong and active lobby in 
Sacramento during the last session of the legislature, and the 
fisherman's license law was passed in response to the urgent 
demand of this lobby to the effect that more money was needed 
to pay for stocking the streams with young game fish. 

At this stage of the proceedings, the State Board of Control 
stepped in and plainly told the commission that the new money 
expected to be realized from the fishing license tax should be 
used for the purpose that the legislature intended, that is stock- 
ing the streams, and should not be dumped in the sink of domes- 
tic expenses to pay salaries. It is a timely action. 



Flouting the 
Civil Service Law. 



38P 
Papers of enrollment in a political 
club have been in circulation or were 
in circulation for some time among 
the employees of the State govern- 
ment in Sacramento. These pledges were circulated and solici- 
ted by officials, and it is stated that some four hundred sig- 
natures have been obtained. Of course a demand of this sort 
presented to a subordinate employee is something like putting 
a loaded gun to his head. It is virtually compulsion to enlist 
for political service, and the practice flouts and nullifies the 
civil service reform law enacted at the last session of the legis- 
lature. This law, which was the occasion of so much jubilant 
hornblowing among the platform carpenters appears to be in a 
way to become a mockery, a delusion and a snare. Among 
other things, it was promised that the San Francisco waterfront, 
which has always hitherto been a center of political corrup- 
tion, would automatically become under the benignant operation 
of this law a home of purity and peace, where no man would be 
compelled to hold his job in virtue of political service. We do 
not know that the personnal of the San Francisco harbor force 
have been as yet solicited to join a campaign club in the inter- 
est of the State administration machine, but if this practice 
is permitted among the employees in the State house, it will 
not stop short of the enrollment of every man who draws a 
salary from the State government. 

The secretary of the State Civil Service Commission, con- 
doning the offense of these official solicitors, makes the lame 



explanation that "the law does not intend to prohibit and does 
not prohibit any man from exercising his constitutional rights 
and doing politically as he pleases." All that may be granted, 
but it does not touch the point or come anywhere near it. The 
law does specifically prohibit the official solicitation of subor- 
dinate employees to engage in political service, and moreover, 
the employee is not doing what he pleases. He is in fact sign- 
ing the roll under compulsion, with a shotgun pointed at his 
head. 

The commisisoners have not been heard from on the subject, 
but they can scarcely afford to endorse the futile explanation 
offered by their secretary unless they are willing to admit that 
the law is nothing better than a piece of political bunk intended 
for show and not for use. 

3®- 

It is proposed in Santa Cruz to in- 
Vocational Training stitute in connection with the new 
In the High Schools, high for that city an experimental 

farm where the students can be 
given practical instruction in agriculture. The idea of course 
is to bring close to the people a limited vocational training of 
the sort which hitherto has been available only as part of a 
university course. It is true that training in technical and voca- 
tional subjects comes more naturally in the later years of ado- 
lescence, say from the age of 16 years to 21, but it is likewise 
true that boys and girls and young men and women cannot al- 
ways afford to give the time and money required for attendance 
on university courses at a distance from their homes. The 
Santa Cruz proposition is intended in a limited and practical 
way to bring at least one important course closer to the people, 
and to make it available at an earlier age. But the News of that 
city inquires what practical results are obtained from the exist- 
ing means of training in agricultural pursuits furnished by the 
University of California. It asks how many pupils are at- 
tending the State farm at Davisville, and what becomes of 
them after they leave that farm? The demand is one for an 
account of stewardship and a showing of results. So far as we 
know, no such account has hitherto been rendered, and while 
we do not doubt that a favorable showing of accomplishment 
can be made, it is time that a show down should be had. 

The January number of Farm and Fireside says "the cam- 
paign for agricultural demonstration and instruction has not 
even begun, if it makes good. That's the only "if" in the mat- 
ter — if it makes good," and this paper says that it rests on the 
institution's giving such courses to "show in five years from 
now that the work pays the farmer." It need not be disputed 
that these questions are important and call for answers, and the 
experiment has been in operation long enough to take an ac- 
count of stock and make a showing of results. 

SB" 

Stanford University is conducting a 
A Department series of tests among the students of 

Of Prophecy. the several high schools in the State 

to determine the intellectual apti- 
tudes of the subjects under examination. These subjects are 
of course the boys and girls who are made to undergo tests 
in mental arithmetic, vocabulary, geography and even puzzles. 
A boy, for instance, shows a remarkable facility for handling 
figures. He will be advised to take up some line of endeavor in 
which his mathematical abilities may serve to bring him suc- 
cess. The idea is that by means of these tests the university 
experts are able to determine whether the student will be a 
success or a failure in his future line of work. 

This is altogether a novel undertaking that doubtless carries 
its inherent dangers. It is always and everywhere dangerous 
to engage in prophecy, all the more so when the data on which 
the predictions are based are incomplete. 



THE CANDID FRIEND 

Why Women Submit to the Tyranny of Fashion— Mrs. Keaton's Diatribe--Emancipation 
of Women by the Slit Skirt-Crazy for Tango— An Eccentric Agitator 

BY EDWARD F. CAHILL 



Mrs. Annie Keaton, addressing the Women's Christian Tem- 
perance Union of San Jose the other day, hotly denounced 
the prevailing styles that women wear. It is a theme that was 
old when Ninevah and Tyre were young. The prophets, the 
sages and the doctors rage, but lovely woman goes her way un- 
heeding. The wave of feminism and the aggressively asserted 
equality of the sexes find no response in the shape of rational 
fashions for the fair. Forty years ago, Monsignor Dupanloup, 
the great French prelate, was heard denouncing "the unbridled 
luxury of women." To-day the pulpit is doing the same thing 
here and abroad. Mrs. Keaton says: "I say that we should stop 
paying tribute to fashion. We have done it too long, and a 
continuation is mere foolishness." Then by way of specifica- 
tions she adds : 

"Such ridiculous hats! Some would disgrace a squaw. 
Hats trimmed with feathers that resemble an article used 
for utility in housecleaning. Some with long, protruding 
feathers which threaten blindness to the unfortunate stroll- 
ing near my lady's glorious creation. Waists disclosing 
bare necks and arms, and scarcely veiling the bust, with 
slit skirts revealing ankles, and calves showing through 
sheer silk stockings." 

5" » S 

The Compelling Motive. 

It is the ancient outcry against the tyranny of fashion, and 
it has been the masculine habit to reply that this tyranny rests 
on no compulsion, that no woman is forced to bedizen herself 
with the often grotesque finery that Mrs. Keaton describes, but 
as a matter of fact this argument is not valid. There is a 
powerful and indeed compelling motive that drives women into 
these displays, and this motive is that the prime aim and pur- 
pose of most women is to secure a husband. Marriage is, for 
nine women out of ten, the only profession, and to that end she 
employs every circumstance of allurement. If in that effort she 
sometimes becomes ridiculous, we should consider the cause. 
If that cause were inactive or altogether absent, we should have 
a feminine world one half dowdy and the other half wearing 
what Mrs. Keaton calls "those ungodly but convenient trou- 
sers," which she seems to regard as evidence of masculine 
superiority. Perhaps Mrs. Keaton is right. A woman's skirt 
is a badge of servitude designed to hamper and hobble move- 
ment. It is a survival o.f the harem and the period when wo- 
men were actually chattel property, 
b" o- o" 
The Subjection of Women. 

Now, the subjection of women, of which John Stuart Mill 
complained half a century ago, is at an end. In Europe and in 
America she is no longer any man's chattel, and yet she does 
not wear those ungodly trousers which Mrs. Keaton believes 
are symptoms of great strength of mind. I fear nobody would 
want to marry a woman in trousers. 
» S 5 
Emancipation by Slit Skirts. 

On the other hand, Professor Charles Zueblin, the famous 
sociologist and lecturer of Worcester, sees in the slit skirt an 
important step in the direction of the emancipation of women, 
and he explains: 

"The elimination of the skirts is obviously in process 
now. Petticoats have been abandoned, temporarily at 
least, and the slit skirt gives promise of a skirtless costume 



in the future. And the savings on skirt materials and petti- 
coats makes expensive silk stockings available for a multi- 
tude of women. What economic possibilities the skirtless 
costume holds. Instead of being immoral, the slit skirt is 
a token of woman's emancipation from sex subjection. If 
ultra-conservative people are shocked and ultra-vulgar 
people are ribald, it is because both prefer the subjection 
of women." 

S o- 5 

Outcry Against the Dance. 

A parallel outcry, almost as ancient and nearly as futile, 
is directed against the dance. It is the immoral pastime of 
the depraved and the degenerate, they cry. Almost the same 
things that are said of the tango to-day were said of the waltz 
a hundred years ago. Back in the late seventies, Ambrose 
Bierce and Rulofson, the photographer, wrote and published 
in this city "The Dance of Death," a mordant satire on the 
waltz as then danced in San Francisco. Indeed, they said worse 
things of the waltz than anybody has ever said of the tango. 
But Mrs. Douglas Crane, who has been seen at fashionable as- 
semblies in this city, declares that the fault, if any, is in the 
dancers and not in the dance, and she writes : 

"I wonder why so many people, generally members of 
sewing guilds or improvement clubs, frown on the joyous 
pastime. The word 'Tango' arouses much indignation in 
certain circles. May I raise a voice in its defense? The 
Tango is a much abused word. It covers the 57 varieties of 
dance steps. There are tongoes of every kind : Blazclian, 
Argentine, Parisienne, that of the New York cabaret, and 
now the San Franciscan. The question is asked: Are 
they vulgar? The steps in themselves of these many varie- 
ties are not; it all depends on the man and woman behind 
the steps. The dances themselves are not so much in 
need of reform as the dancers; it is all in the mind con- 
trolling the movement. I have seen an Oriental couche 
robbed of its appalling frankness by a child-like mind. I 
have also seen, on the other hand, a conventional waltz and 
'rag' (if ever a rag may be so termed), danced in a way 
that suggested vulgarity of mind in every step." 
0- o- 3r 

Immoral on Occasion. 

Let it be conceded that the modern dances, as well as the 
waltz, may be and perhaps often are immoral when danced 
with immoral intent. The matter is largely psychological as a 
question of intention, and it may be admitted at once that these 
dances afford a vulgar opportunity. Yet the tango and its 
kin constitute a great fact that must he reckoned with. The 
craze for these dances has taken possession of town and coun- 
try. It is not at all confined to the young, and it obsesses the 
country and the city alike. Here, for instance, I find a despatch 
from Willows, the county seat of Glenn County in the heart of 
the Sacramento Valley, which tells us in light vein: 

"A tango teacher has been ordered from San Francisco 
by Willows society people. She will be here in a short 
time, according to the latest breathless information 
gleaned this afternoon, and proceed to put this city in line 
for true greatness, along with Paris, Papeete, Constanti- 
nople and Vacaville. Said a husband whose wife sat up 
till 11 :45 about it last night : T object. I think that plain 
ragging is good enough. These new dances are coming 
so fast that pretty soon we'll have to have a teacher on the 
way here from San Francisco all the time if we try to 
keep up. I'll admit that I'm afraid of this tango thing. 
How do they 'catch' as they dance it? Where does a 



January 31, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



gentleman take hold of a lady ? I wouldn't have my sus- 
picions publicly, but it is my private opinion that this here 
dance is too popular to be very nice.' Continued effort 
brought to light a man who had seen the tango danced. 
'They'll be disappointed,' he said. 'It's a swell dance 
when done by professionals with light feet, but it ain't no 
tripity-trip for the gunboats. It's hard to master. It's 
a stately dance, full of grace. Lots of folks would go to 
sleep doing it. As for me, I care more for good, old 
catch-as-catch-can ragging. But this tango thing is new, 
and I guess we'll have to try it. Willows is right up to 
date nowadays, and there is nothing too good for us.' " 
I have seen the tango danced with the utmost grace and with- 
out the slightest suggestion of vulgarity, but as the gentleman 
from Willows philosophically observes, it is not at all a dance 
for the gunboats. "It ain't no tripity-trip." 
~S ~S "S 

"My Favorite Anarchist." 

I used to call him "my favorite anarchist," but in fact he was 
not that kind of character at bottom. The late Carl Browne, 
who died last week in Washington, used to make the grotesque 
boast that he had been in jail "more times than any other 
agitator," which might be thought to imply that he was at war 
with society, but in fact he was a peaceful, harmless sort of 
character, who never said a hard word of any man, and was 
full of eccentric and Impossible schemes for the betterment of 
his fellowmen. His bill to abolish poverty, which he had in- 
troduced in the last legislature was one of the jokes of the 
session. The awkward squad on the local press has been firing 
over his grave and writing a good deal about Browne since his 
death, and what they had to say about him was mostly nonsense 
as for instance : 

"He caricatured and lampooned every members of both 
houses of the State legislature, and the Governor as 
well. Members arriving at the Capital in the morning 
would find copies of the Caucus, probably bearing carica- 
tures of themselves and the author-artist as well, on their 
desks. They always bought the papers from Browne, the 
price varying according to the notion of the legislator." 
Browne never lampooned anybody. His unique mimeo- 
graphed newspaper was, in fact, full of personalities, but they 
were invariably kindly and complimentary. He used to parade 
the town in a glittering tin coat, and fully understood the adver- 
tising value of his eccentricities. In later years he capitalized 
as a form of advertising his participation as lieutenant-general 
in the famous march of the Coxey army from California to 
Washington, D. C. He used to point with pride to his arrest by 
the Washington police because he would not keep off the grass 
in the White House grounds. 

5 8 8 

An Extemporized Colonel. 

Ed. Devlin tells in the Santa Cruz News an amusing story of 

the March of the Coxey army passing through Sacramento, to- 

wit: 

"Those were great old days, when General Coxey and 
Carl Browne were in the limelight. We remember when 
the horde of derelicts floated into Sacramento with 'Colo- 
nel' Inman at their head. The Colonel was a living copy of 
the sort of dead beat immortalized by Mark Twain in the 
'Duke' in Huckleberry Finn. The 'army' was allowed to 
remain for a night at Sutter's Fort, which in the forties 
was the haven toward which the weary pioneers directed 
their steps. 'Boys,' said the Colonel from the steps of 
the fort, 'General Sutter has been so kind as to let us use 
his fort for to-night. Now let's so act that to-morrow we 
can go to the General, hand him the keys and say, 'Gen- 
eral, we done no harm to your property.' The suggestion 
was greeted with as hearty acclaim as if old General Sut- 
ter had not at the time been asleep in his grave fifty years 
or more. The Colonel saw a chance for some easy money, 
and so he arranged a minstrel performance for the next 
night. He secured the Metropolitan Theatre down town 
for the purpose. Everything was donated, and the house 



was filled at a dollar a head, for the good citizens of Sacra- 
mento reasoned the more money the army got the quicker 
it would hike out of town. The Colonel sat in the box of- 
fice and took in every cent. When the last dollar was paid 
in, he grabbed the sack, put it under his coat, jumped into 
a cart tied in front of the theatre, and sped off in the dark- 
ness down the river road." 

The officers caught the evasive Colonel twenty miles down 
the river, and he was sent to Folsom for a couple of years. 

8 8 8 
On the Wrong Foot. 

Collier's Weekly appears to have contracted a habit of get- 
ting things wrong about California and the Californians. Here 
is the latest confusion of epitaphs : 

"Certainly some of the earliest signs set in the new coun- 
try are the iron signs along the old trail connecting the 
monasteries established by the monks who explored the 
Pacific Coast country as far north as San Francisco. These 
old signs have holes punched therein to form the letters, 
and are mounted on iron posts, the graceful curving tops of 
which support a miniature monastery bell." 

Why blame the old padres for these surprising but ob- 
viously modern works of art? 

8 8 8 
Tribulations of a Booster. 

That energetic booster, Colin Mclsaac, of the Santa Cruz 
Chamber of Commerce, had a troubled time explaining things 
last week to a large party of excursionists from Spokane to 
whom he had undertaken to expound the glories and advantages 
of the favored and fertile region which he represents. In the 
beginning, they pulled on him a back number of the Portland 
Oregonian, doubtless inspired by jealousy of the perfection of 
Santa Cruz apples, which stated that the Pajaro Valley was a 
desolate, windswept section of the State where a few rusty 
apple trees were kept alive by the dishwater thrown out of the 
kitchen doors by the housewives. But Mclsaac was right on 
hand with the goods, and promptly overwhelmed and extin- 
guished the doubters, all but one, with a procession of figures a 
mile long which proved that in 1908 the County of Santa Cruz 
shipped more apples than the States of Oregon and Washing- 
ton combined. Hon. Dunk McPherson, in the Santa Cruz Sen- 
tinel, tells what happened then: 

"That sounded like a whopper. Many of the visitors 
gasped for breath, could hardly believe it, but it was the 
truth, nevertheless. As the secretary was passing along 
the aisle of the car on his way into the next car a lady 
turned to him, looked him in the eye and ventured the 
statement that he was the most cheerful liar that she had 
ever seen. Of course, this lady has much to learn; she 
must not forget that she is in a great State." 
8 8 8 

Other Troubles of Colin. 

Other troubles were in store for the ingenious Mclsaac, to 
wit: 

"The train arrived at the Casino, and a stop was made 
so that the people from the Northwest could see the water 
front and its places of amusement. The storm was on, the 
tides high and the waves were sweeping clear up and un- 
der the Casino buildings and the boardwalk. 'Where is 
your beach where the people bathe?' was a question asked 
by many. Secretary Mclsaac could not see the beach him- 
self, consequently could not point it out. He could desig- 
nate the place where it ought to be." 

It was here that Mclsaac had to apologize for the glorious 
climate of California. Owing to the influence of the unruly sun 
spots there had been so much water in the Pacific Ocean dur- 
ing the past month that the beach had mostly washed away and 
gone to sea. But it will come back for summer use. 

buch are the trials and tribulations of the energetic booster 
struggling with an uncomfortable season, but conscious of his 
own integrity. 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 31, 1914. 




TOWN CRIER 



When Commissioner Jones of Santa Cruz took wines and 

liquors valued at $1,500 as security for a water bill due the 
city, he appears to have let loose a flock of official troubles for 
himself and his colleagues. W. T. Jeter compared Jones' ac- 
tion to putting an attachment on an elephant or a tiger for a 
debt due by a circus. The city, it seems, had got hold of the 
tiger by the tail, and did not know whether to hold on or let 
go. We hasten to remark that this official mixing of whisky 
and water imparts no personal reflection on Jones, for he is a 
rigid tetotaller, who has nothing more than a municipal inter- 
est in all that booze. But the Mayor of Santa Cruz, who is a 
man of vigorous logic, insists that it would be grossly inconsist- 
ent for the city to engage in a traffic which it regulates and re- 
stricts for private operation, and the City Attorney intimates 
the town must take out a Federal liquor license "if it seeks 
to discharge the water bill by selling the hot stuff." 

The proposition to separate and segregate the Southern 

Pacific from the Central Pacific would leave the railroad sys- 
tem of California, Oregon and Nevada in hopeless confusion. 
Those two properties are now inextricably mixed, so that they 
must be operated as a whole if the business of shipping is not 
to be hopelessly deranged. For instance, the Central Pacific 
owns the middle section of the Shasta route from Sacramento 
to Redding, while the Southern Pacific owns the extensions of 
the route to Portland on the north and San Francisco on the 
south. These eggs cannot be unscrambled without a serious 
and expensive derangement of public service. In the words of 
the resolution adopted by the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce the proposed unmerger would be "a commercial in- 
jury to the people of this State." 

The difficulties in the way of running a cosmopolitan 

hotel were illustrated in Oakland by the perplexity of a bellhop 
vho was sent around with a call for Ram Rath Puri, a Hindu 
;ditor and publisher, who is visiting California. The bothered 
page varied his summons in this wise: "Call for Rum Raw 
Peru." "Call for Rim Ram Boru!" "Call for Rim Rum Bou- 
rou!" "Call for Raw Raw Perdue!" On the principle of the 
scattergun, that call with variations should have brought results, 
but the Asiatic editor did not know himself in any of these 
disguises, and finally the clerk had to fetch him. 

The latest fad to bedevil the public school system is 

suggested by the Los Angeles Board of Education, who pro- 
poses that the teaching personnel shall be used as an organiza- 
tion for handling charity relief, and he declares that "volunteers 
from the teaching staff would constitute a large organized, 
trained force of willing workers to investigate needy cases." 
The proposition is silly nonsense. School teachers are over- 
worked as it is, and they might as well ask the school-ma'ams 
to turn out and sweep the streets because of woman's proverbial - 
skill in house cleaning. 

Some time ago the Sacramento supervisors made an or- 
der that none but officials should be permitted to use the tele- 
phones in the court house, but a taxpayer, who had business 
with one of the department chiefs, finding him absent, per- 
suaded the deputy in charge to allow him to reach the absentee 
by telephone. It did not work, for the vigilant young lady op- 
erating the exchange knew the payroll voice, and bade him go 
find a telephone with a slot for his nickel. 



State Senator John Bunyan Sanford, of Mendocino, who 

is a Democratic candidate for Governor, announces as part of 
his platform that he would repeal "about three-fourths of the 
laws on the statute book," but leaves us vaguely wondering 
which quarter of the book he would spare. The Senator, more- 
over, announces his tardy conversion to the principle of wo- 
manhood suffrage, and encourages the ladies to use their elec- 
toral opportunities. But one recalls the fact that when the 
suffrage campaign was afoot the Senator was the chief pro- 
tagonist for the antis. 

It seems that some concerted effort might successfully be 

made to unloose that $70,000 which waits in the State treasury 
to be used for the construction of a road into the Sempervirens 
park in the Santa Cruz Mountains. This money will be avail- 
able at once, as soon as some $7,000 is raised by private sub- 
scription to buy rights of way. Fart of this sum has been 
subscribed, and it ought not to be difficult to find the balance, 
as the building of this road would provide work for most of 
the unemployed. 

The press agent stuff about the alleged $2,000,000 pearl 

necklace worn by Gaby des Lys supplies a bitter satire on the 
jewel wearing habit. We are informed that the real pearl neck- 
lace is kept in the safe, and that the pearls that Gaby wears on 
the stage are base imitations. Why not? A necklace is just 
as good as it looks, and no better, and if you can't tell the differ- 
ence between the real and the sham, why, then, the sham is just 
as good as the real. 

"Roughneck" Teesdale, of the I. W. W. has been ordered 

to leave town by Police Judge Deasy. Teesdale recently, in 
the interior valley threatened to march an army of the unem- 
ployed on San Francisco and take possession of the town. Here 
he has been distributing inflammatory literature to provoke a 
riot, but when convicted of that offense, quickly consented to 
leave town rather than go to jail. These fellows are mostly 
noise and nothing more. 

John P. Irish, of Stockton, defends the Japanese "po- 
tato king" against the charge that he has brought about the 
high price of spuds by manipulation. Mr. Irish insists that his 
potato majesty is not responsible unless he is the man who 
makes the rain. "You can't dig potatoes in the wet," says Mr. 
Irish,, and so by a simple and inevitable process of reasoning 
we get back to sunspots as the cause of the high cost of living. 

The war of the weather prophets grows fast and furious. 

Father Ricard sets Professor Larkin a stiff sum in the higher 
mathematics, and tells him that when he has solved the prob- 
lem it will be time to consider his scientific pretensions. Direc- 
tor Campbell of the Lick Observatory delivers a learned side- 
winder addressed to Professor See of Mare Island, and in the 
meantime the heavens are hung with black. 

Society in Tacoma is in rebellion because a city ordi- 
nance is proposed providing for a uniformed policeman to be 
present at every dance held in that city, whether public or pri- 
vate. The modern policeman should be a personage of multi- 
farious gifts, ranging from psychology to mechanics, and 
equally capable as an inspector of plumbing or a censor of 
morals. 

It seems remarkable that the State Federated Trades 

should have so decisively turned down the principle of the in- 
itiative, the referendum and the recall as parts of their consti- 
tution and form of government. These are the accepted modern 
shibboleths of a pure democracy, and their rejection justifies the 
inference that the trades unions are governed by an aristocracy 
of labor, with P. H. McCarthy for its uncrowned king. 



January 31, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



5 






tJm* J&mmaJt iLi/d 




WAND 



"We obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




PAUL GERSON. 



"Adele" at the Columbia Theatre. 

Like a harbinger of blossom-time comes this 
dainty musical gem. Reports of its success have 
been wafted out here from time to time. I un- 
derstand that "Adele" was one of the few real 
successes of the present New York season. After 
witnessing the initial performance in this city, I 
can readily understand this. From a musical 
standpoint alone we have had nothing to equal 
"Adele" here for a long time. The music is uni- 
formly lovely, and is of the haunting kind, and I 
predict that the song, "Adele," will be sung and 
whistled around town within a few days. It is 
easily the prettiest number of the lot, and of 
course there is a repetition of it on every avail- 
able opportunity throughout the play. The 
American adapters went to France to secure 
"Adele." It is the joint composition of Paul 
Herve, who is responsible for the book and score 
by Jean Briquet. In my humble estimation, Bri- 
quet's music is as pretty as anything in either 
"The Merry Widow" or "The Chocolate Soldier." 
There is a swing and lilt to "Adele" which is as 
refreshing as spring time violets. Then, too, the 
story is in keeping, and the plot is more than in- 
teresting. Sunday evening the first act brought 
no less than five curtain calls, and the succeeding 
acts are much better. It is truly months and 
months since we have had anything which has 
possessed the almost indefinable charm of this 
operetta. There is no big chorus to help things 
along; in fact, the entire organization does not 
number more than twenty to twenty-five people, 
but "Adele" does not require a chorus to extol 
its beauties. Outside of the principals there are 
eight women and four men, who aid effectively in 
what ensemble work there is. While I think of it, 
I want to make particular mention of the dressing 
of the women of the company. No more beauti- 
ful gowns have been seen here at any time, and 
Miss Flack, who, I believe, was seen here with 
the "Alma, Where Do You Live" company, 
shows some advance styles which are bound to 
make many feminine eyes stare and wonder. Miss 
Flack does a role, too, which shows her to excel- 
lent advantage. A dainty youngster, Carolyn 
Thomson, does "Adele." She is a perfect type 
for the role. Natalie Alt, who was out here with 
"The Quaker Girl," is doing the same part with the New York 
organization. Miss Thomson has a pleasing presence, and is 
both dainty and petite, and has, moreover, a sweet voice of fine 
quality, though not of much volume. She is a happy selection 
for the part, and handles her many scenes with rare judgment 
and with a sweet simplicity which makes a general favorite of 
her. John Park, who plays the opposite role, is a very good 
actor, and he has a low tenor of both quality and range. He 
has a very big part, and he makes a great deal out of it. He is 
graceful and an actor of ease and discernment. George O'Don- 
nell and Jules Espailly furnish most of the comedy, and right 
well do they take every possible advantage of their situations. 
The cast as a whole is very satisfactory, and the three settings 
are so artistic that they receive a round of applause. "Adele" is 
going to crowd the Columbia Theatre for two weeks. There is 
no question about this. Take my word for it that this dainty 
operetta is the prettiest and merriest musical morsel which has 

ever been served to us for a long time. 

» » * 

"Lion and the Mouse" at the Tivoli. 

The evolution of things theatrical has never been more strik- 
ingly exemplified than it is in this city at the present time. 




Willa Holt Wakefield next week at the Orpheum. 

Here we find some of our most beautiful theatres devoted to 
moving pictures. The Tivoli is a notable example. Built at a 
cost of almost a quarter of a million dollars for operatic pur- 
poses, the tendency of the times has made a moving picture 
theatre of it. Here comes now the artisan with his family, and 
for a few cents they can view the wonders of the film world. 
Truly, conditions have changed. Last week, when I attended, 
I found an enthusiastic theatre full of people all intensely en- 
grossed in the scenes being shown, and leaving the theatre after 
with a sense of satisfaction and contentment. "The Battle of 
Shiloh" was the particular picture being shown, and the many 
exciting battle scenes were followed with rapt attention. Into 
this well known episode of the Civil War has been written a 
well defined love story, which in itself is most interesting. The 
whole thing is handled with consummate skill, and shows to a 
remarkable degree the wonderful advances which have been 
made in moving pictures. I doubt if any form of amusement in 
the history of the world has made the remarkable and radical 
strides which has denoted the development of the moving pic- 
ture industry. It has absolutely created new conditions and up- 
set old theories with a bang, and has set old and staid theatri- 
cal managers by the ears. The fact of the matter is, that many 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 31, 1914. 



of the most prominent managers have already seen the writing 
on the wall, and have, so to speak, taken the bull by the horns, 
and have embarked in the moving picture business on their own 
account. It simply goes to show which way the wind blows, 
and the way things shape themselves now, it is going to be 
rather difficult to hazard even a guess what the present theatri- 
cal conditions will lead to. Go to the Tivoli, and you will fully 
realize the truth of the foregoing statements. A splendid or- 
chestra is provided, which plays appropriate music, uniformed 
ushers lead you to your seats, and everything is carried on in a 
most dignified manner. The seats and aisles at the Tivoli are 
large and commodious, and one can witness in great comfort 
the various feature pictures which the theatre is showing week 
after week. Practically the majority of the best known plays 
are now being shown on the screen, as for example this week 
the Tivoli is showing "The Lion and the Mouse," which not so 
long ago was considered one of the greatest dramatic successes 
of the day. Incidentally it may be mentioned that the pictures 
shown at the Tivoli are remarkably clear and free from any 
blurring or eye annoyances. Go to the Tivoli, and you will 
no doubt be both surprised and pleased. 



The Orpheum. 

The bill this week is of unusual strength and class, and is as 
satisfying as any program shown at this popular house for 
some time. The four original Perez, in their wonderful ladder 
act, start things going, and their sensational feats on horizontal 
ladders is clearly the greatest act of the kind ever shown. 
There is not a single one of the many stunts which they do 
which is easy. In their particular work they are undoubtedly 
without a peer. Roy Cummings and Helen Gladyings present 
themselves in a mixture of songs and dances and witticisms. 
Their special forte is dancing, and it is this part of their act 
which captures the favor of the audience. Ralph Renaud, who 
was formerly connected with two of the local papers, has joined 
forces with Will Irwin in dramatizing one of the latter's stories 
which appeared a short time ago in a weekly publication. The 
act is termed "The Double Gross," and has to do with the un- 
doing of a detective who is out for the graft We had a story 
of a similar nature at the Orpheum but a few weeks ago. Irwin's 
story has all the necessary elements to make it a success. The 
company of four people who are doing the play are all very 
clever, and they manage to sustain the interest in a manner 
which makes the little play grip and hold the attention and in- 
terest of the people out in front. Perhaps the hit of the bill, 
so far as real fun is concerned, is that of James Hughes and 
Jim Cook, who have able assistance in the person of Marie 
Brandon. These two chaps are real comedians, and their stuff 
is all new. Novelty is written all over their act. Miss Brandon 
shows herself to be a dancer of more than average charm and 
grace. She aids materially, and the consequence is that the 
act never lags for a single moment. The audience could not 
get enough of this clever trio, and they undoubtedly have reg- 
istered a big hit. 

Maurice Movet and his wife are in the third week of their 
local engagement. They are this week repeating some of their 
more popular dances. They have certainly proved themselves 
popular heroes in exemplifying the latest movements in the 
various tango dances. Edna Showalter is retained a second 
week, and sings a number of new songs, all of which show her 
splendid voice to great advantage. Frank Keenan is seen for 
a second week in his characterization of the old Confederate 
who comes to plead for his son's life. Keenan is without doubt 
one of our greatest actors, and it is a pity that a fine play can- 
not be found which would afford him an opportunity to display 
his splendid ability to the best advantage. More than a word 
of praise should be mentioned of the fine performance of M. M. 
Barnes, who is associated with Mr. Keenan in his act. Frances 
Cameron, one of the former "Merry Widows," is seen with 
Walter Lawrence in a conglomeration of song and wit. Miss 
Cameron is a beautiful woman of grace and pleasing person- 
ality, and she has a singing voice of rare sweetness which she 
knows how to use. Lawrence sings a number of Irish ballads 
with much feeling and unction. Paul Conchas, a veritable Her- 
cules, has an act which is tremendously interesting. Conchas 
amuses himself by juggling immense cannon balls in a manner 
to make you decidedly nervous. The termination of his act, 
where he has his assistant send a dozen of the balls down a 



chute as fast as they can come, and Conchas catches them on 
the back of his neck and bounces them off, is almost terrifying. 
If by the merest fraction he should miscalculate, any one of 
these steel balls would brain him. It is a wonderful act, and 
his assistant, who proves more than a good comedian, comes in 
for a liberal share of applause. 

* * * 

"The Way to Kenmare" at the Alcazar. 

Andrew Mack is in the second week of his all too brief en- 
gagement at this popular house, and his second offering proves 
to be a good old fashioned melodrama, the kind we saw a de- 
cade or more ago. There is shooting and stolen papers, ruined 
abbeys, false heirs, in fact all the real ingredients are there, 
dished up in the most approved style. And it is a pleasure to 
note how the dyed in the wool Alcazarans take to all this. It ap- 
parently hits their fancy, and they hang on every word with 
bated breath, and are ready to hiss the villain and applaud the 
hero. If memory serves, Edward E. Rose wrote "The Way to 
Kenmare," a few years ago, and I am under the impression that 
it served as a medium for Mack for some time. There is ample 
opportunity for Mack to indulge in all the varied moods of his 
work, and he interpolates a number of his favorite songs. Mack 
is certainly an earnest worker, and in this respect he sets an ex- 
ample to the Alcazar organization. He knows how to use the 
brogue with ease and facility, and his characterizations never 
offend. It is a long time since we have had such a feast of 
real Irish drama, and that the public is cognizant of this is evi- 
denced by the large audiences who are trending towards the Al- 
cazar these days. In all these plays which Mack is showing us, 
there is the tear and the smile closely allied, and the ever strong 
and ready right arm willing to fight for his lady love and her 
honor. It is all old style stuff, but it is human nature after all, 
and that is of course why we like it. The younger generation, 
who never witnessed Joseph Murphy, who for years was our 
greatest exponent of the Irish drama, will find in Mack perhaps 
the closest approach to Murphy. Variety, it has often been 
quoted, is the spice of life, and the Alcazar management is cer- 
tainly striving to give their patrons a variety of all the best 
things to be obtained and procured in the theatrical world. This 
naturally is the secret why they have built up for themselves a 
solid and loyal clientele. No matter when you go there, you are 
always assured of a good performance of a good play, by a 
splendid company of actors, which is always mounted in a man- 
ner which has made the Alcazar the envy and the despair of 
other producing managers. V. T. Henderson is again the vil- 
lain of the play, and acquits himself in a most creditable man- 
ner, and is as bad as any matinee girl could wish. He is an all- 
round good actor. I was particularly pleased with the good 
work of W. J. Townsend in a juvenile role. Then there is J. 
Frank Burke, who enacts a characteristic old man with much 
skill. Kernan Cripps this week also takes on years in an amaz- 
ing manner, and with much credit. Ralph Bell is assigned a 
near-burlesque German, which he does very well. Edward Mc- 
Cormick is seen in another eccentric role, and demonstrates that 
in this kind of work he is an artist. Edmond Lowe is seen as a 
half-witted sexton, which he manages to invest with plenty of 
thrills. Bert Wesner is more than excellent as a good-hearted 
Irishman. David W. Butler surprises with a performance which 
is easily the best thing I have ever seen him do. He makes a 
definite characterization of the part. Louise Hamilton, as the 
heroine, is pleasing, and shows possession of considerable abil- 
ity. She is an excellent foil for the star. Louise Brownell and 
Dora May Howe are good in small parts, and Annie Mack Ber- 
lein, the new character woman, is simply great. I should like 
to see all these new people retained on the Alcazar regular staff. 
They are undeniably clever. The various settings are fine. 

» • » 
Moving Pictures at the Gaiety. 

At the Gaiety Theatre during the past week the house has 
been kept open to show moving pictures of the "Traffic in 
Souls," pending the appearance of Marie Dressier and her 
company next week in the "Merry Gambol," with a great com- 
pany supporting the star. 



Bix — What do you think of those English militants who 

go about smashing window glass? Dix — Some of them are 
homely enough to smash a looking glass. — Boston Transcript. 



January 31, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



11 











. 




^ 






Hfak x 




(K|P^ : 4 : 1 w H!l 


\~?L 




M 

Hi 

i 










% ' flB 







D. A. White, San Francisco's efficient Chief of Police. 

CONGRATULATIONS FOR THE CHIEF. 

Chief of Police D. A. White Publicly Commended for 

. Treatment of the Unemployed. 

Chief of Police D. A. White is receiving well merited con- 
gratulations on the manner in which the police department has 
handled the problems arising out of the presence in San Fran- 
cisco of large numbers of the unemployed. These men are of 
all sorts, good, bad and indifferent. Some of them, and the 
most noisy, are habitual lawbreakers, at war with society, and 
need a stern hand to restrain them from riot and outrage. Un- 
doubtedly we should have had dangerous and destructive riots 
in this city during the past month did we not have a resolute 
chief in command of the Police Department. There was suffi- 
cient evidence of this fact in the sporadic outbursts of disorder 
which, if permitted to go unchecked, 'and gain headway, 
would very shortly have had grave consequences, but at the 
first hint of disorder or threats of violence, it became evident 
that we had a strong and determined man in charge of the 
public safety. The facts here stated find their best confirma- 
tion in the words of Raphael Weill, chairman of the finance 
committee in charge of the funds for relief of the unemployed, 
who writes to thank every individual member of the force, and 
Chief White, "who," he says, "has taken such efficient measures 
for the preservation of peace in our good community." 

While sternly repressing disorder. Chief White is a humane 
man, ready to put his hand in his pocket to relieve distress, 
and he and his brother officers of the department turned into 
the finance committee a handsome contribution of $420 to be 
applied to relieving the necessities of the worthy unemployed. 

The ladies who attend Techau Tavern on Saturday af- 
ternoons will be pleased to learn that a large shipment of La 
Lilas perfume is on its way from the East for presentation ir. 
souvenir form. This perfume is from the famous laboratories 
of V. Rigaud of Paris, the maker of Parfum Mary Garden, and 
has won instant recognition as one of the most delightful per- 
fumes yet produced. Upon its arrival this perfume will be 
alternated with the Aubrey Sisters' cosmetics as the Saturday 
afternoon souvenir. 



Mrs. Fox — Great news, John. Our son is engaged to 

Miss Golder. Fox— What! Then I shall object to the mar- 
riage. Mrs. Fox — Object! Are you out of your senses? Fox 
—Not at all; but if we don't kick a little the Golders will think 
we don't amount to much, and they'll probably call it off. — 
Boston Transcript. 



Alcazar Theatre 



O'Farrell Street n"ar Powell 
Phone ECearnj 2 
Commencing Monday Night, February 2nd, Continued Succobb ol thi 

of Irish Plays: The Eminent Irish Singing Col Ian 

ANDREW MACK 

Supported By His Own C any And The Alcazar Players In A Magnifi- 
cent Revival of 

"ARRAH- NA- POGUE" 
Dion Roucicault's Immortal Irish Play 
Prires— Night. 25c to til Mat. 25c to 60c. 

Matinees. THURSDAY. SATURDAY. SUNDAY. 



Columbia Theatre 



Corner Geary and Mason Streets 
Phone Franklin L50 

!■■• "ND .. D LAST WEI K BEIIINS SUNDAY NIC,HT rh FEB''T° BPlaS,hOU8i ' 
MATINEES — WEDNESDAYS AND SATURDAYS 
"Dainty — Fragrant— Tuneful — Cast of Exeellenee" —Examiner 
"A Musical Triumph" All Critics. The French Operetta in Three Acts. 

"AD ELE" 
Creat Cast— Enlarged Orchestra. Last Time Sunday Night. February Sth. 
Monday. February 9th. The Comedy -Drama— "MILESTONES" 
Matinees— Wednesdays and Saturdays. Special Prices Wednesday Matinees. 
i'ic to $1,511. 



Tivoli Photo Theatre 



Eddy Street near Market 
Photo-Plays de Luxe,. 



TREMENDOUS SUCCESS! 2nd and LAST WEEK STARTS SUNDAY! 
The Dramatic Masterpiece ! 

"THE LION AND THE MOUSE" 
A Filmatization of the Powerful Play by CHARLES KLEIN. Six Superb Parts 
Continuous, 12 M., to 11 P. M.. Daily. Matinees 10c: Evenings. 10c and 20c. 



Orpheum 



O'Farrell Street Bet. Stockton and Powell 

Phone Douglas 70 
Safest and Most Magnificent Theatre in America 



Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

DELIGHTFUL VAUDEVILLE 
WILLA HOLT WAKEFIELD, "The Lady at Piano:" First Time in White 
Face. EDDIE LEONARD, the Minstrel assisted bv MABLE RUSSELL: CLAUD 
,v. FANNIE USHER in "The Straight Path;" Dr. CARL HERMAN, The Elec- 
trical Wizard: QOLEMAN'S EUROPEAN NOVELTY. Harmonizing Antago- 
nistic Domestic Animals: THE FOUR ORIGINAL PEREZ: WORLD'S NEWS 
IN MOTION VIEWS: WALTER LAWRENCE and FRANCES CAMERON, 
in "A Bit of Broadway;" RETURN FOR ONE WEEK ONLY, NANCE O'NEIL 
and Company in the famous "Curse Scene" from "The Jewess." 
Evening prices. 10c, 25c. 50c. 75c Box seats, $1. Matinee prices 
(except Sundays and holidays). 10c. 25c. 50c 

O'Farrell. Opposite Orpheum 
Phone Sutter 1111 



Gaiety Theatre 



EVERY NIGHT. Commencing Monday. February 2nd 
Che Great American Comedian 

MARIE DR ESSLER 
In Her Big New Musical Revue 

"THE MERRY GAMBOL" 
Supported bj a Company of 70 Comedians. Dancers. Singers and Specialties. 
GAIETY PRICES — 2*C to $1.00. 
Matinees. THURSDAY. SATURDAY and SUNDAY 

SVmphoNY 

ORCHESTRA 

Hehky HAOLcr Conductor. 

PORT. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY ft. 3 P. M 

SOLOIST — JOSEF 

H O F M A N N 

Program Includes; Beethoven Symphony Mo. 7, \ Maim 

Rubinstein c.,neerto for Pianoforte No I, op:70. Strauss. "Till Bnlen. 

- Merry Pranks." Rondo, op 

Tickets on sale Monday at Box Offices ol Sherman, clay .V. Co., kohl-r 

and theCort Theatre. Prices: 7oc, $1 .on. $1 :». *.M»>; Box and Loge Seats. P.0U. 



HOTEL SHATTUCK 

FIREPROOF 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Thirty-five Minutes From San Francisco 

$3.00 per day American Plan $1.50 per day European Plan 



TELEPHONE PROSPECT 1973 

OLITA LUNT YOUNGBERG 

Pupils received for the modern dances. Rag, Tango, 
Hesitation Waltz, Relaxation, Grace Culture. Interpre- 
tation of Song. 

14M POLK STREET STUDIO 11 

SKETCHES IN VAUDEVILLE FURNISHED 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 31, 1914. 




The dansants at the Palace Hotel have lent a bouquet to the 
dancing life of the city, for which we should all be grateful. 
Without bending, much less breaking, the high standard of ex- 
clusiveness which must obtain in order to keep these affairs 
from sagging into the commonplace, the Palace dansants are 
nevertheless managed in such a way that the taint of snobbery 
is absolutely lacking. It takes great finesse to accomplish this 
result, and it is impossible to give a blue print plan of just 
how it is done, but on the other hand it is equally impossible 
to attend one of these affairs at the Palace without realizing 
that there is just the right atmosphere — which means that the 
invitation list has been properly experted. There is a great 
difference between experting, and the patronesses of these dan- 
sants have evidently the combination of knowledge which one 
jo rarely finds in semi-public affairs of this sort. For example, 
there have oeen other dansants where the committee in charge 
has offended people of the very best social position just because 
they did not happen to know of their claims to this estate. When 
the dansants at the Palace were started, there were those who 
predicted that the idea was being spread so thick over the sea- 
son that people would soon tire of having all their days and 
nights set to dance music. But the manner and method of the 
Palace dansants has extended the popularity of these affairs, 
and undoubtedly prolonged their life. 
© © © 

A New York woman who spent last week in these parts has 
established a new standard of frankness. The chatelaine of 
one of the magnificently hospitable mansions down the penin- 
sular way arranged an informal luncheon and bridge party 
in her honor. About a dozen women arrived at the appointed 
hour, to find that the motif of the occasion was not there. In- 
stead, the hostess displayed two letters which would make an 
illuminated "People's Exhibit A." in any bridge case In the 
first note, the New Yorker thanked the hostess very prettily 
for asking her to a bridge luncheon, and then added that she 
never accepted bridge invitations unless she knew beforehand 
what the stakes were. The reply stated that out here stakes 
are not so high as in New York, and they would probably play 
for twenty-five cents a point. Came a courteous answer from 
the New Yorker, which made every one who read it sit bolt up- 
right, while exclamations and expletives forked through the 
room like lightning. 

One of the women who read it told me about it. The New 
Yorker said that she hoped her hostess would not catalogue her 
as rude or smugly virtuous, but she would have to refuse to 
come to a bridge for such high stakes, for she had seen such 
havoc wrought in the lives of women who played for high 
stakes that she had made it a rule never to play in a game in 
which the stakes were more than a twentieth of a cent a point. 
The New Yorker has unlimited wealth, so her position is altru- 
istic. The friend who told me about it lost sixty-five dollars 
that very afternoon. However, her bridge score for the season 
shows that she is about twenty dollars ahead of the game. I 
asked her what she thought of the attitude of the New Yorker 
and she admitted that she would like to make a rule like that for 
herself, and then frankly added : "But I can't afford to. It's all 
very well for a woman as rich as she is to take that stand — no 
one could call it petty economizing — but if I did it, every one 
would say that I was a stingy spoil-sport, and I'd lose some of 
my most valuable' friends who now like to have me about be- 
cause I play a very good game of bridge. I'll admit that there 
was a time last season when I was several hundred dollars in 
the hole, and so worried about it that I had a touch of neuritis." 

Evidently even the luxury of economy is denied society peo- 
ple who are poor. 

© © © 

Not since Mrs. James Lees Laidlaw, the wife of the New 
York banker, was out here two or three years ago have the 
bridge tables rattled so over a refusal to play. At that time 
Mrs. Laidlaw was the guest of the Crockers and the Bournes at 



Burlingame, and every one down the peninsular way was play- 
ing for neat stakes. Mrs. Laidlaw refused to enter a game on 
the ground that she could not afford to hazard money that way, 
preferring to put it into the suffrage cause, which she con- 
siders is no risk, and pays enormous dividends in the future 
promise for all women. Mrs. Laidlaw has not been in Cali- 
fornia since the suffrage was extended to women, but she is ex- 
pected here in February, and will again be the guest of the 
William Bournes, and it will be interesting to observe how she 
divides her time between society and the movements in which 
she is interested. She is a very beautiful woman, and the most 
brilliant of the New York society women who have widened 
their horizons until all women regard them as friend and sister. 
© © © 

The news that for a year or two at least Eugene de Sabla 
will make London his headquarters may precipitate another 
engagement announcement in the De Sabla family. Miss Vera 
will shortly become Mrs. Paine, so that California will not lose 
her, and it is said that her younger sister is lending a favorable 
ear to a plea to stay out here as the mistress of her own home, 
and that even if she goes to London, it will be for a short time. 
The De Sabla place, which is one of the show places of the 
peninsula, will not be sold, as the family intends to eventually 
return here, and it is possible that Mrs. Clem Tobin, Mrs. De 
Sablas oldest daughter, will occupy it in her absence. 
© © © 

In contrast to the blonde beauty of Mrs. Clem Tobin, who 
was the queen of the last Mardi Gras ball, the brunette loveli- 
ness of Mrs. Edgar Peixotto will enhance the beauty of this 
year's pageant. The choosing of Mrs. Peixotto for the place of 
the queen of the Mardi Gras ball is a very happy one. Of late 
years, blonde beauty has reigned at these balls, Mrs. Fred Kohl 
and Mrs. Clem Tobin epitomizing the golden splendor of the 
two most recent queens. Mrs. Peixotto has not yet announced 
the names of the maids in her retinue, but is consulting with 
Joe Redding, who will arrange the pageant and is working on 
a Beauty and Beast idea, which is a decidedly new departure. 
Queens and kings have heretofore risen from the misty past and 
royally bestowed high favor on the merry masquers, so there 
is much interest in the development of Redding's idea. 

The money made at the ball will, as usual, be given to the 
Children's Hospital, which is more in need of funds than ever. 
The passage of the eight hour law for student nurses has in- 
creased the expense of maintenance, making the employment of 
more nurses imperative. The law was bitterly opposed by the 
directors of this hospital, but the other day I talked to one 
of the young society matrons who is a member of the com- 
mittee which is in charge of the ball, and she admitted that 
most of them had come to a realization that not until this law 
was passed did they realize that a large part of the charity came 
from the student nurses. The extra hours which the nurses 
used to put in helped to keep down expenses at the cost of the 
health of the student nurse, so it must be admitted that her do- 
nation to charity was larger than that of the person who helps 
along by spending from five to twenty dollars at the Mardi 
Gras ball. The passage of a law has made it impossible for 
the hospitals to exact this toll from the student nurses, so so- 
ciety will be given its annual chance to excel itself in generous 
spending at the Mardi Gras ball. With the dancing craze add- 
ing fresh impetus to a desire to take part in this affair, the 
committee was at a loss to know where to find a place large 
enough to accommodate all those who want to be a part of this 
joyous spectacle. The pavilions which San Francisco offers do 
not furnish the right sort of background for a thing of this sort, 
and it was finally decided to use the Palace Hotel again and 
convert into use every inch of its floor space, so that the crowd- 
ing of last year will be avoided. This means bands for every 
room, including the men's grill, the court, and the main dining 
room. 

Already the costumers are busily engaged on robes that will 
dazzle and delight even the eye accustomed to the splendors of 
our Mardi Gras. The Templeton Crockers are said to have or- 
dered their costumes made, while they were in Paris, and they 
are even more startling and brilliant than those they wore at 
the last Mardi Gras. Mrs. Fred McNear is always depended 
upon to furnish a thrill, and those who know say that this year's 
thrill will make those of former years look like mere samples 
of thrillers. It is no easy matter to find something new and 



January 31, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



beautiful with which to brighten the jaded eye, accustomed 
to all the Oriental splendors which have draped the landscape 
ever since Kismet kaleidoscoped its colorful way over the 
land. ,About four years ago, Mrs. Willard Drown created a 
sensation at a Mardi Gras ball by appearing as a bride of the 
harem in white satin trowsers and filmy chiffons, all conspiring 
to make the pulse of any well regulated masquer beat faster. 
But to-day that costume would not create a ripple of interest, 
for we have been regaled with Orientalism in its most amazingly 
beautiful form and color, and nothing less can make the multi- 
tude articulate its admiration with an "Oh, my!" It takes 
much imagination and originality plus money working overtime 
to create a costume that stands out from the multitude, and it 
will be interested to note how many really achieve distinction 
this year. 

© © © 

The Cinderella ball, on Friday night of this week, cannot be 
used as an argument in defense of the popularity of the sub- 
scription balls on a large scale. The Cinderella is in a class by 
itself, and" acceptances to it are a foregone conclusion. But 
there is no doubt that this has not been the season for balls 
of the sort that Ned Greenway manages in his incomparable 
manner. In spite of the fact that dancing is more popular than 
it has ever been, the Greenways have never been so poorly at- 
tended by the people whose names are the bulwark of the smart 
set roster. The only convincing reason that I have heard is that 
the very popularity of dancing has put a blight on the Green- 
ways, which sounds like an Irish excuse, but was given by a 
perfectly good descendant of a German. In former seasons 
there were comparatively few dances, and so there was great 
enthusiasm about the Greenways, and they were accredited 
backgrounds for the display of evening frocks. But now, when 
every one is dancing at all hours of the day, the Greenways do 
not stand out on the calendar as they did before. 



CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL BALL. 

The Auxiliary of the Children's Hospital will give their an- 
nual Mardi Gras ball at the Palace Hotel, Tuesday evening, 
February 24th. Tickets, exclusive of supper, will be $5, and 
may be purchased from the following: Mrs. Walter Martin, 
Mrs. Follis, Mrs. Fred McNear, Mrs. William Taylor, Mrs. Ju- 
lian Thome, Mrs. Harry Poett, Miss Emily Carolan, Mrs. D. 
Boardman, Mrs. N. P. Ames, Mrs. H. Pillsbury, Mrs. George 
Cameron, Mrs. Fred Kimble, Mrs. Augustus Taylor, Mrs. Henry 
Kiersted, Mrs. Harry Bates, Mrs. N. K. Davis, Mrs. Latham 
McMullin, Mrs. L. I. Scott, Miss M. Houghton, Mrs. H. F. Dut- 
ton. Boxes may be reserved by applying to Mrs. George Cam- 
eron and Mrs. Walter Martin. Among those who have already 
secured them are: Mrs. H. T. Scott, Mrs. James Flood, Mrs. 
Frank Proctor, Mrs. Walter Seymour, Mr. E. W. Hopkins, Mrs. 
Geo. Newhall, Mrs. Walter, Mrs. Fred Kohl, Mrs. Hotaling, 
Mrs. C. T. Crocker, Mr. F. C. Talbot, Mrs. Selah Chamberlain, 
Mrs. John Drum, Mr. Knox Moddox, Mrs. Frank Carolan, Mrs. 
Heller, Mrs. A. Stone, Mrs. Wm. Sproule. There will be two 
bands of music. Mr. Redding is planning a surprise pageant 
which should be most amusing. 



One of Breuer's big canvases can be framed by E. B. 

Courvoisier as expeditiously and as satisfactorily as a little 
Copley print, or a monotype by Xavier Martinez. A wide and 
exclusive collection of framing materials. 431 Sutter street. 

(Albert Ijwtnenll 




fogr siini<al ©(BsSgifosir off IPanriiskiia IFtnecfes 



Scottish Rite Temple, Van Ness and Sutter 
Just Opened Telephone Prospect . 



LA NUIT ROUGE 

HOTEL ST. FRANCIS ROSE SUPPER ROOM 

Monday, February 2nd, After the Theatre 

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice will present THE APACHE. 
the dance they made famous in Paris, London and 
Berlin. 

Exhibitions of the Tango and other dances 
every night during the week. Table service a la 
carte or table d'hote. Informal. 

Under the Management of James Woods 



HAVE YOU DINED IN THE 

PALM COURT 

PALACE HOTEL ? 
Most Beautiful Dining Room in the World 



Fairmont Hotel under 
the same management 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 



HOTEL OAKLAND g5JL 

460 Rooms with Outside Exposure (No Court Rooms) 
RATES: Rooms, detached bath $1.50 per day and up 
Rooms, private bath $2.00 per day and up 
EUROPEAN PLAN 

Advantageous Rates to Permanent Guests 
Noted for Cuisine and Service Restaurant Prices Moderate 
Home Atmosphere and Genuine Hospitality 
VICTOR REITER, Manager 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

125 miles south from San Francisco. 
Finest all grass Golf Course in Califor- 
nia. Daily rates, $5, $6, $7 per day. 
Special monthly rates. 

PACIFIC GROVE HOTEL 

Three miles by trolley from DEL 
MONTE, under same management. 
Daily rates $2.50 to $4 per day. 
Special monthly rates. 



Above hotels are under the management of 

H. R. WARNER, Del Monte, tahforr.ia 



Mrs. Marie Read 



Miss Josephine K. Fischer 



"$p (Sift atii) jPauour £>linp" 

Applied Art Needle Work Hand Painted China 

Occasion Cards, Card Prizes and other 

Artistic Novelties 

B - ! " - - BIIILDDIG. Phone r>ous:l»!. B 

;i:t:Fi AT GRANT AVE., s. k.. iai,. 



WE MOVED JANUARY 26 

TO 

228 POWELL STREET 

Next Block North Same Side of Street 

F. L. HEIM & SON 

Men's and Women's Fine Shoes 

Sole Agents For 

Dr. A. Reed'* Cushion Shoe and Heim's Orthopedic Shoe 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 
■ ■ ■ ■ '•' ■■ — ■■'■■■ ■' 



January 31. 1914. 



., ■ ■ . ■ ., ■ .,, ■ . . '■ ' . ' - ■• ' ' .."-. - .■ ■.■■■ 

■li .■■■■.-■ ... ■■ I ! I MMI I Mll ■ - * I ■ 





SOClMrl^RSONaL 01MS 



Announcements suitable for this Department are desired. Contri- 
butions must reach this office by Wednesday morning to appear In the 
current Issue, and must be signed to receive attention. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 

DICKSON-EHRHORN — Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Dickson, of Belvedere. 
are announcing the engagement of their daughter. Miss Marion Dick- 
son, to Adolph Ehrhorn. 

FAY-DILL. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Fay announce the engagement of 
their sister, Miss Edna Fay. to Mr. Marshall Dill of this city. 

HANDLEY-RUSSELL — Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Handley announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter, Miss Gertrude M. Handley, to Francis E. 
Russell, the son of Mrs. Emma Russell. 

KATZ-WISE. — Mr. and Mrs. J. Katz announce the engagement of their 
daughter. Bertha, to K. Wise, of Portland, Ore. 

l.ASSITER-MUNRO.— Colonel and Mrs. "William Lassiter. of Fort Mc-, 
Dowell, AMgel Island, announce the engagement of their niece, Miss 
Katharine Leigh Lassiter, to Lieutenant Horace N. Munro, First 
U. S. Cavalry. 

('LIVER-CHAMBERS.- An engagement of the week was that of Miss 
Mary Oliver, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Oliver, and Horace Ed- 
ward Chambers of this city. The groom-to-be is the son of Edward 
Chambers, vice-president of the Santa Fe Railroad. 

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

DE SABLA. — Archbishop Patrick Riordan will officiate at the marriage 
of Miss Vera de Sabla and Herbert Payne on February 3d. 

FRIEDMAN. — LECHER. — Mrs. M. Friedman announces the marriage of 
her daughter. Miss Fannie Friedman, to Mr. Emil Lecher. The wed- 
ding will take place in New York City. 

REID-TUBBS. — The marriage of Miss Merritt Reid and Chapin Tubbs 
will take place the latter part of March at the home of the bride in 
San Mateo. 

WALKER-PRENDERGAST.— Mr. and Mrs. David H. Walker made 
known the engagement of their daughter. Miss Catherine L. Walker, 
to Arthur C. Prendergast this week. The marriage of the young cou- 
ple will take place Thursday evening, February 5th. at the Walker 
home, 2213 Steiner street. 

WEDDINGS. 

DE YOUNG-THERIOT.— Miss Kathleen de Young, the third daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. M. H. de Young, was married to Mr. Ferdinand Theriot, 
son of the late Ferdinand Theriot of New York, at St. Mary's Cathe- 
dral at 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, with Archbishop Patrick Rior- 
dan, assisted by Bishop E. J. Hanna and three of the priests of the 
cathedra' parish. Afterwards there was a wedding repast at the de 
Young home in California street. 

/IANNIGAN-HOOPER. — Miss Josephine Hannigan became the wife of 
Arthur Hooper at a beautiful home wedding Tuesday evening at the 
home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. P. Hannigan, at the 
Kellogg, Rev. Edward Morgan officiating. 
ACOBS-FROHMAN.— Miss Helen Jacobs, sister of Mrs. F. J. Frohman 
of Ross, and Mr. Sieg Guggenheim of Manila, were married in that 
city on December ISth. 

LOH1IANX-S.MITH.- Walter Z. Smith, acting manager of the Philippine 
Islands. Telegraph and Telephone Co., was married to Miss Sophie 
Lohmann, daughter of Mr. and Mrs, H. Lohmann of Berkeley, in 
Manila on December 24th. 

LArTER-STERNBERG.— Mr. and Mrs. Sig Lauter announce the mar- 
riage of their daughter. Miss Beatrice Lauter, to Carlos Sternberg. 
They have left for the South on their honeymoon. 

SMITH-FREEMAN.— A beautiful simplicity marked the wedding of Miss 
Josephine Bartlett Smith and Lieutenant-Commander Freeman, 
which took place on Wednesday of last week at high noon In Christ 
Church, Coronado, California. 

YOUNG-SULLIVAN.— Miss Laura L. Young, of Missoula, Mont., and 
Charles Sullivan of this city, were married in St. Marys Cathedral 
Friday evening last. 

TEAS. 

FOX. — Mrs. Moylan Fox. Sr., was a hostess last Sunday afternoon in 
honor of her son's bride, Mrs. Moylan Fox. Jr., and entertained a 
number of her friends with tea and a game at the bridge tables. 

OR.\r, — Mrs. Otto Grau was hostess at a bridge tea at her home across 
the bay Tuesday, entertaining in honor of her sister-in-law from 
Sacramento. 

MARTIN. — Mrs. Eleanor Martin, who is never so happy as when she is 
helping some visitor to enjoy a sojourn in San Francisco, exercised 
her genial spirit on last Friday afternoon at a tea for Countess del 
Valle del Salazar, wife of the Spanish Consul. 

POMEROY.— Mrs. Carter Pitkin Pomeroy will be a hostess at a bridge 
tea this Saturday afternoon at her home in Clay street. 

SMITH. — Mrs. Harrison Smith gave an informal tea Tuesday afternoon 
for Mrs. Thomas Dibblee and Miss Delphine Dibblee of Santa Bar- 
bara, who are in town as the house guests of Mrs. Eleanor Martin. 

SYPHER. — La France, Kill am ey and American Beauty roses in profu- 
sion were the radiant decorations used by Mis. Leigh Sypher Tues- 
day afternoon at the bridge tea at which she entertained about fifty 
of her friends. 



DINNERS. 

ADAMS. — Lieutenant and Mrs. David Wood, who have recently returned 
from their honeymoon in the Bermuda Islands, were the guests of 
honor at a dinner given Saturday evening by Captain and Mrs. Frank 
Howard Adams at their quarters at Fort McDowell. 

CADWALADER. — Mr. and Mrs. George L. Cadwalader gave a dinner 
Thursday evening last week, when they entertained for friends. 

DODGE. — Tulips, fuchsias and daffodils adorned the dinner table over 
which Mrs. Henry L. Dodge presided Wednesday evening at their 
home in Franklin street, in honor of General and Mrs. Bailey. 

KELLEHER. — Mr. and Mrs. Jas. P. Kelleher entertained at dinner at the 
Cecil on last Thursday evening, their guests later attending the 
soiree dansant at that place. 

KNIGHT. — Miss Margaret Knight, daughter of Colonel John T. Knight. 
was the motif for a prettily appointed dinner given by Lieutenant and 
Mrs. David P. Wood at their attractive quarters at F»rt McDowell 
on Saturday evening. 

KOHL. — Mr. and Mrs. C. Frederick Kohl entertained a nuinuer of friends 
at a dinner Friday evening at the Fairmont Hotel in honor of Mr. 
and Mrs. William Delaware Neilson. 

OTIS. — Mr. and Mrs. James Otis gave a dinner Friday evening. January 
30th, at -their home in Broadway. 

PHILIP. — Bishop and Mrs. Wm. Ford Nichols, Rev. and Mrs. Wm. A. 
Brewer of Burlingame, Mrs. George W. Gibbs and Rev. Edward Mor- 
gan were guests of Dr. and Mrs. John Harold Philip at dinner at their 
home in Steiner street Saturday evening. 

MOORE. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Moore gave one of the elaborate dinner 
parties of last week, entertaining in honor of Dr. T. C. Chu, com- 
missioner from Peking to the Panama-Pacific Exposition. 

MOONEY. — Mr. and Mrs. Squire Varick Mooney extended their pleasura- 
able hospitality at a dinner party on Saturday evening. 

LUNCHEONS. 
BAILEY.— Mrs. Charles Bailey, the wife of General Bailey, was the 

eomplimented guest at a luncheon and matinee party Wednesday 

afternoon, given by Mrs. Spencer Buckbee. 
CLARK. — Mrs. Warren Dearborn Clark entertained a number of friends 

at a luncheon and bridge party Thursday at her home in Clay street. 
HENSHAW. — Last week an extremely handsome luncneoti was given 

by Mrs. William G. Henshaw at the St. Francis, with Mrs. W. H. Bre- 

voort as guest of honor. 
KEENEY. — Mrs. James Ward Keeney has issued invitations to a luncheon 

which she will give to-day at her home in Buchanan street. 
SCHl'LTZ. — Miss Hattie Schultz entertained at a handsome luncheon 

on Thursday last in honor of Mrs. Samuel Hopkins. 
ZEILE.— Miss Marian Zeile made Miss Vera de Sabla, who will become 

the wife of Herbert Payne next Tuesday, the motif for a pretty 

luncheon at the Francisca Club Wednesday. 

RECEPTIONS. 

MATSON. — Mr. and Mrs. Matson and Miss Lurline entertained their friends 
on board the Matsonia last Sunday. On Thursday the Matsonia 
sailed for Honolulu. 

NEILSON. — A reception and tea dance was given on last Saturday 
afternoon at the Fairmont Hotel by Mr. and Mrs. William Delaware 
Neilson in honor of their son and daughter-in-law. Mr. and Mrs._ Fel- 
ton Elkins. 

REIS. — Mrs. Julius C. Reis gave a bride party Thursday evening of last 
week in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Selby. 




e n 



STRAIGHT 

ourbon 



Charles Meinecke & Co. 

tiiNT, PAOine Coast 314 SACRAMENTO ST., S. F. 



January 31, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



DANCES. 
iiki'tei;. — The handsome!} appointed apartments of Mr. ami Mis Ernest 
Heuter at the Regina were the scene of s dinner dan m Saturday 

affair was in h r of In-, ami Mrs. Edwin Shorb. 

UABD1 GRAB. Thi patron 01 the Mar.ii Qras Ball, which will 

take place February Mth at the Palace Hotel are Uesdames Walter 

s. Martin, George Cameron, Ja s Follls, Frederick Kimble, Latham 

McMullln. Frederick McNear, William 11. Taylor. .lr.. Augustus Tai- 
lor. Henry T. Kierstedt, Julian Thorns, Harry Bates, Harry Poett, 
Francis Carolan, Norrls Davis, Danforth Boardman, Laurence Scott, 
Norman Preston Ann's, Horace Plllsbury, Henry Foster Dutton and 
Miss Cora Smedberg 

nfcBRYDB. — Mr. and Mrs. Douglas McBryde gave a supper dance on 
last Saturday evening iii honor of Lieutenant and Mrs. Emery Smith. 
wlio are spending their honeymoon with the former's mother at the 
Cecil. 

ROSENWEIG. — The Baroness Rosenweig. aunt bf the Misses Josephine 
and Rosita Nieto. gave a dancing party on Thursday evening at 
the Palace Hotel. It was preceded by a dinner party. 

SEARL.ES. — On January 30th. Mr. and Mrs. Denis Searles gave a dance at 
the Claremont Country Ciub in -honor of Lieutenant and Mrs. Smith. 

SOUTHERN COTILLION.— Another dance of the Southern Club was 
given on Tuesday, January 27th, at the Hotel St. Francis, instead ot 
on Wednesday. 

T. M.I. ANT. — Mrs. Frederick W. Tallant entertained the young friends of 
her daughter, Miss Helen Talalnt, at an informal dance Friday even- 
ing of last week, at her home in Buchanan street. 

TEVIS. — Dr. Harry Tevis has issued invitations to about two »score 
young people for an informal dance to be given Friday evening, Feb- 
ruary 6th, at the Palace Hotel in honor of Miss Sadie Murray and her 
fiance. Lieut. H. Conger Pratt, U. S. A. 

DANSANTS. 

BOWES. — Mrs. Edward Bowes was one of the many at the dansant at the 
Palace on Saturday afternoon. 

ARRIVALS. 

ANDERSON. — Mrs. C. O. Anderson, wife of Captain Anderson of the 

ship Marion Chileott, has arrived in San Francisco. 
BALDWIN. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Baldwin have forsaken their home 

at Broadmoon, Colorado Springs, preferring to pass February in 

California. 
BIGELOW. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bigelow of Santa Barbara are being 

cordially greeted by their many friends. 
CHASE. — Miss Ysabel Chase came down from Napa recently, and is the 

guest of Miss Evelyn Barron at the Hotel Bellevue. 
CRITTENDEN. — Mr. and Mrs. Howard Crittenden, who nave been In 

New Orleans and other Southern places, are established at the Re- 

gellus. 
HILL. — Mr. and Mrs. Horace L. Hill, Jr., have arrived at the Fairmont 

Hotel from Omaha. 
MARTIN. — Captain C. A. Martin, First Infantry, with station at Scho- 

lield Barracks, Hawaii, registered at headquarters and is staying at 

the St. Francis Hotel. 
NICHOLS. — Miss Peggy Nichols arrived home the first of last week after 

a most delightful visit in New York. 
POND. — Mrs. Gardner Pond and Miss Dorothy Deming are :n town from 

their home at Santa Cruz, and will spend a week or so at the Ceetl. 
ODEL.L.— Second Lieutenant H, R, Odell, Third Field Artillery, is in this 

City from Fort Sain Houston on leave 01 abse 

WHITNEY. — Mrs. T. Dykes Whitney and Miss Margaret Whitney of 

Chicago, the tatter of whom has just returned from a two 
* music ionise in Europe, will arrive to-day to visit Colonel and Mrs 

Thomas Rees at their home mi 1 ua1 street. 

DEPARTURES. 

B11TMIN.— Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ilotliln, who came up from their home 

at Monhiiio two weeks ago for a sbort sojourn in San Francis* 

turned to the Southern resort on Satun 
CROWBLL.— Mrs. \v 11 Crowe!! has departed for a trip ;n Southern 

California, She will Bpend most of her time In Los .-\ngeies and in 

Coronado. 
EVANS;— Evan Evans Br., left a few days ago for England and Scotland 

1, piss the remainder of tie- year with relative*. 
GASSNER.— Mrs. Louis Qassner left recently for an extended visit in 

the East. 
IIAI.I.ORAN J. F. Ilalloran left on the 83d tor an extended tour through 

Syria and Egypt 
MOURE.— Mrs Moore and her son. Kenneth Moore, left last 

Thursday tor Chicago, where they will visit Mr and Mrs. Arthur 

i :■ issler. 

PAGET, i is en route to London on a brief business 

trip, and to visit his mother, lady Paget 
PINCKARD— Miss Mary Eyre and Mrs Qeo. Plnckard left for the East 

..,,,i,i fc, tin- i. .iter being called Bast on account of the m- 

i ^on. 

SI I I,, . v:i ,,,l Mrs, John T. Sutton and their two sons left on Sat- 

.1 for New Yoik. expecting to sail Janus 
Europe. 



INTIMATIONS. 
HEYLARD. Miss So,.|,ie Bcylard will leave for home this week 

an ex; mm J,, x,. w y.,,1, Ul ,| |-„, s ,,,,| 

BLACK \ iresent plan M \i i ,s,- Black will be 

ented to Kin I Queen Mors tins year In London. 
BOTHIN- Mi .-mil Mrs. i i ,. who have n In s 

for the greatet part of ti„- winter, are spending a few weeks in San 

FranclBco. 
pHAMBERLAIN.— Mrs. vVHIard Chamberlain is the gui 

ihs, Charles Mcintosh Keeney at tin- Fairmont 

DEl'IKS— Lord and I ... I -,-, , , 

here and at Sants Barbi I C nado will be the IncentI) ' mucn 

entertaining, at both have man] friends hen 

DRYSiiALK— jir. ami Mrs. Drysdale ,i Vancouver have i n a ling 

the past week at the Fairmont. 

ELKINS.— Mr. and .Mrs. Felton B. Elklns will have shorn-, tOl 
Barbara, where they have taken active cottage. 

GERSTLE.— Mr. ami Mrs. Willi, :,-, itle arrived in Paris January 6th, 

HARRISON. — Miss Teres:-, Harrison win entertain ii .1 luncheon for Miss 
Ila Sonntag on February 4th. 

ST. GOAR. — Miss Erna St. Goar will he a luncheon hostess mi Tues- 
day, February 3d, at her home in Calif la street. 

WHEELER. — Miss Olive Wheeler will K ive a luncheon mi February 6th in 
compliment to Miss lia Sonntag. 

HALE. — Mr. and Mrs. Prentiss Cobb Hale are expected home from New- 
York the first week in February. 

IRWIN. — Mrs. Wallace Irwin, alter concluding her visit here, will go to 
San Diego to visit relatives. 

JOSSELYN. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Josselyn and Miss Marjorie Josselyn 
are planning to leave soon for Europe, to be away over the summer. 

LENT. — Mr. and Mrs. George H. Lent are contemplating a trip to Panama, 
and expect to leave the first week in February. 

MACKAY. — Mrs. John W. Mackay has purchased the auxiliary schooner 
Amaryllis from Count d'Hautpoul, and will spend the winter cruising 
in the Mediterranean. 

MURPHY. — Captain and Mrs. Pierce Murphy are sailing for the Philip- 
pines on February 5th. 

SCOTT. — Mrs. A. W. Scott, who has been in Europe for the last three or 
four years, is now in Manila with friends. 



Mistress — Did the mustard plaster do you any good, 

Bridget? Bridget — Sure it did, mum; but, begorry, it do bite 
the tongue. — Boston Transcript. 



Alice — Does your husband talk much about his mother's 

cooking? Kate (wearily) — Some; but not as much as he does 
about mine. — Boston Transcript. 



Dr. Clyde Payne and Dr. Eugene Payne. Dentists, have resumed 

practice at 116 Grant avenue. Telephone Kearny 66. Hours: 9 to 4. 



Dr. .1. H. Bchri 816 l'helan Building. San Franeiseo. relieves 

strain Classes worn only temporarily. 



STOCK RANCH 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. 1,500 acres 
12 miles from San Jose, two miles from a station, on the 
Southern Pacific Railroad. About 300 acres tillable land, 
200 acres of which is mostly level, and has been sown to 
wheat, producing enormous crops. The balance is rolling 
hills, with a small piece of rough land covered with natu- 
ral grasses, affording abundance of feed during the sum- 
mer months. A creek runs through the property, and 
numerous springs give plenty of water for cattle. 
Improvements are old, but with small expenditure could 
be put in first-class condition. The place has been used 
as a stock ranch, and turned off 250 head of horses and 
beef cattle a year, and if properly equipped, would make 
a good dairy or hog ranch, being close to the railroad and 
markets. About 200 acres would be suitable for orchard. 
Price $27.50 per acre, one-half cash, balance easy terms. 

Address HEDLEY HALL, 21 Sutter St., San Francisco. 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 31, 1914. 



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18 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 31. 1914. 



GLEANED FROM CLUBDOM 



"Old Man" of Oregon Short Line Honored. 

With the railroads this week — and by no means taking second 
place despite the momentous decision of Chairman Eshleman 
of the Railroad Commission to be Hiram Johnson's running 
mate in the elections next fall — the topic of live interest is the 
fact that the "Old Man" of the Oregon Short Line has gone 
back. Those who are familiar with the history of railroad 
building on the Pacific Coast will remember E. E. Calvin as 
the man who drove the first spike in the Oregon Short Line 
System. And it was as General Superintendent of that system 
that he won the title of the "Old Man." Ask any railroader 
what that means, and he will tell you that when a general super- 
intendent is well enough beloved by the employees of a rail- 
road, he is always given that title, and railroad men will gen- 
erally go "the limit" for the man who earns it. All of which 
has to do with, or is preliminary to, reference to the fete at 
which President William Sproule, of the Southern Pacific, was 
host on Saturday night last at a dinner given in the Bohemian 
Club's Red Room to Mr. Calvin, who has resigned as vice- 
president of the road to fill the same position with the Oregon 
properties. There were some forty officers who have been asso- 
ciated with Mr. Calvin for many years who were present, and, 
judging by the complimentary remarks made in the various 
speeches, the retiring officer is as well beloved in the Southern 
Pacific as with the men of the road he rejoins. 

Incidentally, during the course of the dinner, Mr. Calvin 
was called upon to give a speech. Thereby hangs the tale — 
and because of that request, the "hit" of the evening was made 
possible. Those in San Francisco, and in fact anywhere on the 
coast, who have had the privilege of Mr. Calvin's acquaintance, 
do not need to be told that he is a man of few words. In fact, 
he is about as close-mouthed as the proverbial clam. It was not 
therefore surprising that he very modestly asked- to be excused, 
and delegated to C. W. Durbrow, who, by the way, is the well 
known light in the Southern Pacific's legal phalanx, to respond 
for him. As it may be easily understood, it was Mr. Durbrow 
who made the hit. It must be explained that the latter is dis- 
tinguished because of his manner of quick, nervous speech. On 
the contrary, the voice of Mr. Calvin is inclined to brusqueness. 

Mr. Durbrow has missed his calling — as a star mimic he 
would undoubtedly surpass anything in the running. Imitating 
the voice and manner of the retiring official, he proceeded to 
give an account of his stewardship. 

Said Mr. Durbrow — temporarily, Mr. Calvin — in gruff sim- 
plicity of language: 

"They wanted a railroad from Fernley to Lassen — I built it. 

"They wanted to electrolize the transbay lines — I did it. 

"The company wanted the Harriman Memorial Safety Medal 
—I got it. 

"They wanted to double track from here to Ogden — I built 
it. 

"They wanted a block signal system — I built it. 

"They wanted more ferry boats — I got them." 

Needless to say, the person who enjoyed the little mimicry 
most was E. E. Calvin himself. 

Among the many flattering things said of the guest were ref- 
erences to the manner in which he rose in the railroad world — 
from telegraph operator for the Union Pacific in Wyoming at 
the age of nineteen, to his present high office. During his 
younger days, he had many thrilling experiences in which or- 
ganized posses for the capture of train bandits was one. Laying 
all joking aside, Mr. Calvin is essentially a doer of deeds, and 
an Al railroader. He possesses a genius for management of the 
details of operation as well as building, and the warm ex- 
pressions of appreciation on the part of President Sproule were 
not only sincere, but indeed well deserved. 



Prominent National Figures Press Club Guests. 

San Francisco's newspaper men have started the new year 
with more than ordinary vim. Several attractions are scheduled 
to take place in their handsome Sutter and Powell streets home, 
and if the New Year's resolutions hold good, the Press Club 



hospitality will gain increased eminence in a field where an en- 
viable reputation is already earned. On Sunday night, Febru- 
ary 1st, the regular monthly dinner dance will be distinguished 
by the attendance of Secretary of the Treasury Hon. Wm. G. 
McAdoo and Secretary of Agriculture Hon. David F. Houston. 
Following this function, the club members will devote all their 
energy to preparations for the "Eight Years After" show. And 
when newspaper men band together for the purpose of putting 

on a show, there is generally "something doing." 

* * * 

Masked Ball in Prospect. 

The whisper is going the rounds among the clubmen that 
elaborate preparations are under way for the grand masked ball 
to be given in the home of the Union League Club. Nothing 
definite has reached the outside, but something which prom- 
ises a surprise even for those who are as accustomed to having 

them as are the favored of the Union League, is on the books. 

* * * 

Winged "0" Educational Progress. 

Members and officers of the San Francisco Olympic Club are 
taking considerable pardonable pleasure from the fact that their 
institution is fast gaining ground as a recognized educational in- 
stitution, besides filling its function as a home for the men who 
form its membership. Extensive preparations are being made 
for the great Indoor Meet that is scheduled to take place on 
the twentieth of next month. When that meet takes place, the 
club is confident that it will be able to demonstrate effectually 
that they are doing wonders toward the development of the 
man who carries the brain— that the body is being cared for 
and trained that it may better be able to foster the mind. 

* * * 

The Junior members of the Olympic Club are being instructed 
thoroughly, and great progress is being made in this direction. 
Next week, the News Letter will publish photographs of this 
phase of the club's activities, because it is believed that the 
work is one in which not only members of the Olympic Club are 
interested, but one which will appeal to every reader of this 

publication. 

* • * 

There is considerable excitement in the neighborhood of the 
Winged "O" gym owing to preparations on the part of amateur 
fistic enthusiasts for the contests to-night. In fact, these activi- 
ties threaten to deprive the bowling alleys of their attraction 
for the time being — which is saying something for the boxers. 

• « • 

"It's funny," declares a prominent member of the Pacific 
Union Club, "the way San Franciscans, at times, seem to re- 
gard their own talent. My reason for saying so is because, 
within the past two weeks or two I have had occasion to attend 
one or two performances, both in the Hotel St. Francis and else- 
where, when local talent was the attraction. And I had im- 
pressed upon me the truth of that old adage about a prophet in 
his own city. Local talent does not seem to draw. And, if San 
Franciscans only realized it, the talent I have heard is consider- 
ably in advance of outsiders, who have drawn packed houses 
for exhibitions vastly inferior." 



-"So you want to marry my daughter," said Mr. Cumrox. 

"Yes," replied the young man. "I hope to hear you say take 
her and be happy!" "No, sir. I am not going to shoulder any 
implied responsibilities. All I am going to say is 'take her.' " 
— Washington Star. 



"I wonder why the baron and Javomir, the poet, always 

go about together? They are so utterly different." "Well, the 
baron thinks himself intellectual when he is with the poet, and 
the poet thinks he looks smart when he is with the baron. "— 
Fliegende Blaetter. 



Bill — Do you get good board where you eat now? Tom 

Good board? Why, I eat off the arm of a chair every meal. — 
Boston Transcript. 



January 31, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



OBITUARY. 

William G. Irwin. 

William G. Irwin, the millionaire sugar planter, banker and 
capitalist, died on Wednesday at his home in this city, 2180 
Washington street. Mr. Irwin was 70 years of age, and his 
death was due to nervous troubles. 

Prior to his retirement from active work some four years 
ago, Mr. Irwin was a leader in the sugar planting field on the 
Hawaiian Islands, and in that industry he acquired his great 
fortune by his own exertions and ability. He was a native of 
England, and his adventurous spirit brought him early in life 
to the Hawaiian archipelago, where he began life as a clerk, but 
soon branched out as a sugar planter, and in a few years 
amassed a great fortune. Mr. Irwin was a British subject, and 
as such his purchase of the entire island of Lanai in the Ha- 
waiian group became a subject of international controversy. He 
took over the entire island of 139 acres in discharge of a debt 
due on a mortgage by Charles Gay, an American. The courts 
finally decided in Mr. Irwin's favor. The island and most of 
his other Hawaiian possessions were transferred by Mr. Irwin 
to C. A. Brewer & Co., in 1909, when he retired from business. 
At the time of his death Mr. Irwin was attended by his wife, 
Fannie Ivers Irwin, and daughter, Mrs. Helene Irwin Crocker, 
and her husband, Charles Templeton Crocker. Miss Irwin mar- 
ried Charles Templeton Crocker on February 27, 1911. Among 
her wedding gifts were a check for $1,000,000 from her father, 
and a deed to "Uplands," a fine country estate in San Mateo 
County, from the bridegroom. 



REAL ESTATE BARGAINS. 



Mrs. Henry E. Highton. 

Mrs. Lallah Highton, widow of the late Henry E. Highton, 
who was a distinguished member of the San Francisco bar, 
died on last Sunday morning at her home, 1400 Washington 
street, in this city. Mrs. Highton was a member of the Califor- 
nia Club and the Women's Auxiliary of the California Pioneers. 
She was active in Civic Center work, and was one of the or- 
ganizers of the Woman's Exchange and the local branch of 
the Red Cross Society. She took a strong interest in. art, and 
was wont to extend a helping hand to rising sculptors and 
artists. Mrs. Highton is survived by two sisters, Miss Ida 
Scooffy and Mrs. Edith Cook, and a brother, Leonidas Scooffy, 
a real estate broker in this city. Her remains were laid in Holy 
Cross Cemetery after a requiem high mass in St. Mary's 
Cathedral. 



A BOOK FOR BOYS. 



Grace MacGowan Cook and Caroline Wood Morrison have 
written a book for boys. "William and Bill" are cousins. Wil- 
liam is all gentleness and refinement, never let out of sight by 
his widowed mother; "a ladylike boy," his cousin calls him. 
Bill is coarse and vulgar, but develops into a manly and honest 
fellow. It seems as if the writers wished to ridicule good man- 
ners and refinement. The book is full of amusing tales. One 
of the most amusing is the chaptei which tells of the first for- 
mal call the boys make on "the girls." The book will make a 
pleasant evening's entertainment for young people. 

"William and Bill." Published by the Century Co. 
* • » 
GEORGE HAMLIN FITCHS LECTURES. 

George Hamlin Fitch, author of "Comfort Found in Good 
Old Books," "The Critic's Travels," etc., is giving a course of 
six lectures on "The Great Spiritual Books of the World" in the 
art gallery of his publishers, Paul Elder & Company, 239 
Grant avenue. The lectures are to be given weekly on Thurs- 
day afternoons, commencing February 5th, and will include the 
following: "The Influence of Spiritual Books," "Books of Great 
Churchmen," "Shakespeare and His Plays," "The Great Poets," 
"The great Novelists," "Some Great Inspirational Writers." 



The First Lady — My husband wired me from Paris on 

my birthday, asking whether he should buy me a Rembrandt 
or a Titian. Now, which would you have? The Second — Well, 
as far as that goes, any of those French cars are pretty good. — 
The Sketch. 



FINEST DAIRY FARM IN CALI- 
FORNIA, NINETY MILES 
FROM SAN FRANCISCO 



ACREAGE 

750 acres (survey shows 787.5 acres), all deep river bot- 
tom sediment soil, less than two miles from a first-class 
shipping point on the Southern Pacific Railroad, within 90 
miles of San Francisco, and 9 miles south of Stockton. 
350 acres are in alfalfa, yielding six cuttings, balance in 
barley and pasture. 

IRRIGATION 

A pumping plant has been installed, equipped with a 

10-inch centrifugal pump, 18 inch steel intake pipe, taking 

water from the San Joaquin River, 40 horsepower electric 

motor, capacity 3,500 gallons per minute. 

A large canal runs through the property, and smaller 

ditches are being completed for irrigation. 

When the balance of the land is prepared, it will be 

seeded to alfalfa. The place will then carry 600 he^d of 

milch cows, young stock and hogs. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

Fine modern electric lighted dwelling. 
Spacious farm-house. 

New ice plant for cooling milk and refrigeration. 
Cow barn, accommodating 400 head of cows at one milk- 
ing, with storage capacity for 800 tons of hay. 
Two new silos, concrete foundations, of 1,500 tons 
capacity. 

Several small barns. 
Blacksmith shop and outhouses. 

Tank house and tank, 42,000 gallons, operated by elec- 
tricity. 

Large weighing scales. 
All necessary implements. 

STOCK 

350 head of fine young milch cows. 
25 head of work-horses. 
5 thoroughbred bulls. 

500 tons of alfalfa and barley hay in the stack. 
At the present time, 750 gallons of milk are being shipped 
daily, with a milking of 250 head. We are in a position 
to contract for all the milk produced at 15 cents per gal- 
lon, F. O. B. railroad station. 

REMARKS 

The place, with only one-half of the acreage under culti- 
vation, is paying over 12 per cent net, and when fully de- 
veloped, at a small expense, will more than double the 
present net income. This is the best acreage investment 
in California, having many natural advantages, cheap 
shipping rate to Stockton and San Francisco, free water 
for irrigation from the San Joaquin River, cheap electric 
light and power, most productive soil, and ideal climatic 
conditions. 

TERMS 

Price, $200,000. $60,000 cash, balance in four equal an- 
nual installments, with interest at 6 per cent. The profits 
of the ranch should take care of the deiened payments 
and development. 



address, HEDLEY HALL, 

21 SUTTER ST., S. F. 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 31, 1914. 



ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



Columbia. — The season's records will chronicle no greater 
success than "Adele," which begins a second week with Sun- 
day night's performance. Matinees during the engagement are 
given on Wednesdays and Saturdays. 

Only two cities in the State of California are to see Klaw & 
Erlanger's production of the comedy drama, "Milestones," pre- 
sented by the London-New York cast. Many out of town orders 
have already been received at the Columbia Theatre box-office. 

Bessie Abbott will make her first appearance in San Francisco 
in the artistic revival of "Robin Hood." Klaw and Erlanger 
promise the identical performance as given at the Knicker- 
bocker Theatre, New York. 

* * * 

Tivoli. — "The Lion and the Mouse," the filmatization of 
Charles Klein's powerful play of the same name, has made such 
a hit at the Tivoli that the management has wisely decided to 
continue it for another week, commencing Sunday. The cast 
is made up of sterling players, especially selected for their 
respective roles by Charles Klein himself, and there are so 
many more scenes and incidents shown on the screen than are 
given in the play that the spectator gets a much better insight 
into the author's intentions than by witnessing the four acts as 
ordinarily played. A new Keystone comedy will lend variety 
to the bill, and the big Tivoli orchestra will furnish delightful 
music, as usual. 

* * * 

Alcazar. — For the third week of his engagement at the Alca- 
zar Theatre, Andrew Mack, the celebrated interpreter of Irish 
drama, will offer, supported by his own company and the Alca- 
zar players, a splendid and elaborate revival of the greatest of 




Scene from "The Lion and the Mouse,' 
Charles Klein's great play at the Tivoli. 



the filmatization of 



to take place at the Tivoli Opera House for the two weeks be- 
ginning Monday, March 16th. The company, under the mana- 
gerial and musical direction of Cleofante Campanini, numbers 
over three hundred people, including forty principals, a chorus 
of sixty, orchestra of sixty-eight and a big ballet. Great in- 
terest centers in the first appearance here of Titta Ruffo, the 
world's greatest barytone and foremost singer, who will sing 
the title role in the opening opera, "Rigoletto." 




Scene from the super-sensational photo-drama, "Traffic in Souls." 



all the Irish plays, "Arrah-Na-Pogue." The late Dion Bouci- 
cault wrote this famous play for his own use, and starred in it 
for many years. During the action of the play, Mack intro- 
duces four of his own compositions, and also his own arrange- 
ment of "The Wearing of the Green. There will be no advance 
over the regular Alcazar prices, and the matinees will be on 
Thursday, Saturday and Sunday, as usual. 
• * * 
Chicago Grand Opera Company's Season. — Max Hirsch, the 
representative of the Chicago Grand Opera Company, paid a 
flying visit to the city the early part of the week to make the 
preliminary arrangements for the coming season of grand opera 



Reserved seats for the season will range from five dollars to 
two, and the sale will begin at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s Tuesday 
morning, February 10th. Seats for single performances will 
range from six dollars downward, and will be placed on sale a 
week before the first opera. 

* * * 

Orpheum. — The Orpheum announces for next week a bill of 
headliners. Willa Holt Wakefield, "The Lady at the Piano," 
will play her last vaudeville engagement in this city. 

Eddie Leonard, the popular minstrel, will make his first ap- 
pearance in white face, assisted by Mabel Russell. 

Claud and Fannie Usher will appear in a new sketch, "The 



January 31, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



straight Path," in which they will have the assistance of the 
famous "Spareribs." 

Dr. Carl Herman will perform marvelous feats with electri- 
city, over which he has a perfect control. 

Goleman will introduce his marvelously trained animals, con- 
sisting of dogs, cats, pigeons and squirrels. 

Nance O'Neil will return for next week only, and present her 
characterization of Leah in the "Curse Scene" from "The 
Jewess," one of the greatest triumphs of the present day. 

The only holdovers will be the Original Four Perez and 
Walter Lawrence and Frances Cameron. 



San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. — The eighth symphony 
concert of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, which will 
be given at the Cort Theatre Friday afternoon, gives every 
promise of being the "event" in the life of the orchestra. The 
illustrious Beethoven, the emotional Rubinstein and the extra- 
ordinary Richard Strauss will be represented by their greatest 
compositions, and the program will have the assistance of Josef 
Hofmann, the world's greatest pianist 

The conductor and music committee have decided to substi- 
tute the Seventh Symphony of Beethoven for the Sixth. Vieing 
in popularity with the Fifth, the Seventh Symphony was fin- 
ished in the year 1812, and was first performed at a concert in 
Vienna for the benefit of the Austrian and Bavarian soldiers 
wounded at the battle of Hanau. Of all the Beethoven sym- 
phonies, the Seventh is the most romantic as well as the most 
happy. Richard Wagner, with his keen insight into the sub- 
jectivity of music, declares that it is the apotheosis of the dance, 
the ideal embodiment of the bodily movement — a definition 
which admirably applies to the symphony, as nearly all its 
motives are ideally perfect dance rhythms. The entire sym- 
phony is exuberant and the most complete expressions of whole- 
souled enjoyment of life which our musical literature contains. 

The audience will rejoice in the playing of Rubinstein's D 
minor concerto for pianoforte and orchestra, by Josef Hofmann. 

The novelty of the program will be the Richard Strauss "Till 
Eulenspiegel's Merry Prank," after the old-fashioned roguish 
manner in rondo form. 

Seats for the concert will go on sale next Monday at the box 
offices of Sherman, Clay & Co., Kohler & Chase and the Cort 
Theatre. Prices, 75c, $1, $1.50, $2. Box and loge seats, $3. 

* * * 

Kreisler to Appear with San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. 
— Fritz Kreisler, who is on a tour of America this year, un- 
der the direction of C. A. Ellis, of Boston, and is making his 
only appearances on Friday afternoon, February 20th, with the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, and in concert at the Cort 
Theatre, Sunday afternoon, February 22d, and at the Scottish 
Rite Hall, Thursday night, February 26th, does not belong to 
that school of violinists which seeks to win the plaudits of the 
public by sensationalism of geture and interpretation. The hall 
mark of his art is sincerity. He demands it in others, and he 
rigorously exacts it of himself. Mr. Kreisler is under the local 
management of Frank W. Healy. 

* * » 

Kohler & Chase Hall. — Mrs. Olive Timmons, operatic mezzo- 
contralto, will be the soloist at this week's Matinee of Music, 
which will be given under the auspices of Kohler & Chase this 
Saturday afternoon, January 31st. Mrs. Timmons is an ex- 
perienced vocalist who has been active professionally for some 
time. She possesses a finely modulated and well placed voice 
of a velvety quality, which she uses with gratifying judgment. 
In addition to an aria from Carmen, Mrs. Timmons will sing 
songs from De Lara, Temple and Schubert. The instrumental 
section of the program will be unusually attractive this time, 
including works by Wieniawski. Greig and Brahms, all of 
which will be interpreted on the Knabe Player Piano. There 
will also be a selection for the pipe organ included in the pro- 
gram. 



"What's most liable to get broke about you automobile "' 

"The owner," replied Mr. Chuggins. — Washington Star. 



WEATHER REPORT. 

It rains. 

The atmosphere is moist, 
Damp — humid — dewey — 
In liquid condition; 
In a state of complete 
Saturation 

As it were — not to say 
Wet. 

The little flowerets are showing 
Their faces — all teary — 
Like babies 

Asking to be kissed. The grass 
Is growing; 
The garden truck 
Is going some. 
Soon will the 
Onion 

Be casting pale fragrance 
On the air. 

The beets are up — the cabbage 
Also 

Is showing its head. And it is 
Wet- 
That is to say — 
Rather. 

In other words — it's raining, and 
Oh, you umbrella 
That I lent last week! 



-Fresno Herald. 



SPRING CLOTHES 

FOR MEN 

It is a trifle early to show the new suits 
perhaps. Most clothiers will keep them 
back until they get a month more of business 
out of Winter styles. 

We prefer to give you the opportunity 
to get a Spring model now, if you want a 
new suit. 

Hub clothes are made by leaders of 
style, who don't need to wait on others. 
Styles are fixed when these garments appear. 

The ^nb 

Chas.Keilus 8rCo.<inc> 

726- MARKET STREET 



T>l*phos« Kearny uoi Private Exchange Connecting All Warehouse! 

SAN FRANCISCO WAREHOUSE CO. 

Warehousemen Forwarding Agents Distributors Public Weighers 

Spar Track Conaecuoai With AM Railroad! 

Main Office: 62S-647 Third Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. (Ad»nia<menti 



Gouraud's Oriental Beauty Leaves 

A dainty little booklet of exquisitely perfumed powdered leaves to 
carry In the purse. A handy article for all occasions to quickly Im- 
prove the complexion. Sent for 10 cents tn stamps or coin. F. T. Hop- 
kins. S7 Great Jonea SL. N. T. 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 31, 1914. 




By R. R. l'Hommedieu. 
Dealers and the Law 

The stand taken by the Motor Car Dealers' Association of 
San Francisco concerning the action of the judges at the police 
department in the handling and enforcing of the traffic laws of 
San Francisco means much to the city at the present time. 

While the dealers are hardly in accord with both the courts 
and the police department in the enforcing of laws bringing to 
justice those violators who endanger the life and limb of the 
citizens of the city and county of San Francisco, yet at the same 
time they feel that to make out extreme punishment for techni- 
cal violations does more harm than good. 

Technical violations of the law are generally the result of 
thoughtlessness or carelessness, and in many cases even while 
not in accordance as prescribed, yet do not endanger the life or 
limb or property, especially when a careful driver is at the 
wheel of the motor car. Yet this is no reason why the violators 
even of technical violations should go scot free. 

The motor car dealers feel that every one who breaks the 
law, technical or otherwise, should be made to realize their 
short-comings, but what they do object to is extreme penalty to 
cases similar to some of those that have been before the courts 
recently. To insist on the letter of the law would mean that 
motorists who are about to come to San Francisco with their 
motor cars will be hindered for the fear of not being familiar 
with these laws they are likely to visit the county jail at the 
expense of the people. Nothing takes away from a section 
quicker than to have it known that its courts and police depart- 
ment are drastic in their action. 

Hence it is that the action of the Motor Car Dealers' Asso- 
ciation in bringing about a better understanding between the 
motorist, the court and the police department is something very 
commendable, and one which the public at large should fully 
appreciate in more than mere words. 



New Club Active 

The board of directors of the Automobile Club of Northern 
California held a most important meeting last Thursday even- 
ing. An active touring campaign .for the members was out- 
lined for the coming season. While this will be an outing for 
the members, yet at the same time it will be a tour in behalf of 
good roads, as it is proposed to preach the gospel of better 
highways from one end to the other of the journey. 

The moment that the roads become passable, a program 
of week-end tours will be announced. It is proposed on these 
occasions to make arrangements beforehand with hotels for ac- 
commodations, gasoline and oil supply and other necessities. 
In other words, these tours will be personally conducted by the 
officials of the club. 

While these events will not take the form of club runs of 
the olden days wherein those participating raced along the road, 
and there was a cloud of dust from one end of the journey to the 
other, and which was quite evident from the appearance of the 
motorists when they arrived, it will be more of a rendezvous 
when those participating can make the journey to suit their own 
convenience. It is proposed to have some form of amusement 
for those participating, on the Saturday night of these runs. 

There will also be a midsummer vacation tour which is likely 
to be for thirty days. This run will more than likely be divided 
up in sections, so that those taking part will not necessarily 
have to make the entire run. 

The Motoring Magazine (the monthly automobile section of 
the News Letter), was officially selected as the official organ 
of the Automobile Club of Northern California. 

The directors went on record as not favoring any proposition 
whereby the club will handle the insurance on the cars of 



member's, or that will in any way deal in supplies, tires or sun- 
dries of any kind. The board of directors wish it to be known 
that it will look after the interests of its members from a legal 
and social standpoint, providing those comforts which pertain 
to club life. W. G. Scott, the well known booster of the Inyo 

County Good Roads Club, was elected an honorary member. 

* * * 

Highway to Santa Cruz 

The Santa Cruz branch of the State Highway is to be com- 
pleted at an early date, according to advices received at the 
county seat from Sacramento. Bids for the construction of six 
miles of the road from Glenwood will be opened at the office of 
the commission on February 2d. This construction will be on 
a dirt grade to be later covered according to the demands of 
the best modern construction. The accepted and completed 
plans for the rest of the road from Glenwood to Santa Cruz 
are now on their way to County Surveyor Baldwin. Upon their 
receipt, the viewers will go over the road, and fix values as 
quickly as possible on all contested stretches of rights-of-way. 
As soon as the work is finished, bids for the construction of the 
balance of the road will be asked for by the State Commission. 
In the opinion of Commissioner Blaney the completed road with 
the final concrete coating will cost $225,000 instead of $150,000 
as at first estimated. The commission has decided to finish the 
road in splendid shape. 

Vanderbllt Race Details 

The committee announces that the Wm. K. Vanderbilt, Jr., 
race will be started at ten o'clock a. m. sharp, February 21, 
1913, and should be finished before two p. m. The International 
Grand Prize Race will be started at ten o'clock a. m. sharp, 
February 23, 1913, and should be finished by three-thirty p. m. 
This will eliminate the all-night trip to the beach and the before 
dawn gathering at Santa Monica. 

One big grand stand will be built on the ocean front, as has 
been the case in past Santa Monica races. The grand stand 
seats will sell for two-fifty and three dollars; boxes, containing 
six seats, will sell at thirty and forty dollars. The parking 
spaces around the course have been reserved by the committee, 
which especially urges that official parking' space be reserved 
in preference to that controlled by private parties, whose sole 
interest in the races is how much money they can make out of 
them. The committee is going to take every precaution in their 
power to keep the Vanderbilt Cup and the Grand Prize race 
tickets out of the hands of speculators, but feel that they can- 
not absolutely guarantee that there won't be some cases of 
scalping. As far as the box seat sales are concerned, no box 
seats will be sold to any one without securing their names and 
addresses, and in that way the committee feels that they can 
protect the sale of box seats at least. 

Reserved seats will go on sale at the Los Angeles offices of 
the Western Automobile Association on Monday, February 2d. 

The entries for the Vanderbilt Cup and Grand Prize races 
were opened at noon, January 20th, and at that date stood as 
follows : 

Stutz car, driver Earl Cooper; entrant, Walter M. Brown Co. 
De Lage, Omar Toft, Leotia K. Northam, Inc. Mercer, Spen- 
cer Wishart, Mercer Automobile Co. Mercer, Edwin Pullen, 
Mercer Automobile co. Mercer, Barney Oldfield, Geo. F. Set- 
tle. The above cais are entered for both races. 

A tire company has entered their 120 horsepower Fiat in the 
Grand Prize race, nominating Teddy Tetzlaff as driver. 

• * * 

New Chairman 

Richard Kennerdell, the recently appointed chairman of the 
Contest Board of the American Automobile Association, has 
always been interested in competition of every kind. Originally 
a cyclist of note, he naturally took to the motor-driven vehicle 
when it appeared, and being of a mechanical turn of mind, he 
understands the technicalities of automobile manufacture. 

Chairman Kennerdell has invited all the members of the 1913 
Contest Board to continue in office, and it is expected that all 
of them will accept re-nomination. Furthermore, former Chair- 
man Shimpf has consented to serve, and a large number of the 
State representatives will also remain in office. One of the 
plans of the Contest Board is to issue membership buttons both 
to drivers and mechanics, and to amateurs as well as to pro- 
fessionals. 



January 31, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



23 




News 
Gathered 
Along 
Auto Row 



Marmon "41" (j cyl. 5 Pas. Touring Car. 

New TJp-to-Date Garage 

There has just been opened on Post street, between Jones 
and Leavenworth, the Class "A" Garage by C. A. Lyons and 
F. C. Harrison. Lyons & Harrison have had extensive experi- 
ence in handling garages, and in their latest venture have 
brought out one of the most modern homes for the motor cars. 

Located in the central part of the city makes it exceedingly 
accessable for the business men. The building is strictly fire- 
proof and up to date in all its appointments, being large and 
spacious, and allows of easy handling of the cars within the 
building. 

These modern ideas, backed up by a splendid service, are 
certain to make the Class "A" garage one of the most popular 
places to house a motor car in the city. 

* * * 

New Marmon "Six" 

The new Marmon "Six" is considerably smaller than the 
Six-48 model, and coming about midway in point of size be- 
tween that and the four-cylinder Marmon "thirty-two." The 
new car has six cylinders with a bore of four and one-quarter 
inches and of five and one-half inch stroke. They are of the 
L-head pattern, cast three in block. It also has full floating 
rear axle, with the housing of pressed steel. 

It has a convexed curve type body of substantial and durable 
sheet metal construction. The doors open forward on con- 
cealed hinges with door handles on the inside. 

The front doors are cut back of the forward edge of the front 
seat cushion, giving easy entrance to the front of the car, espe- 
cially on the left or driver's side. The steering column is ad- 
justable, permitting the driver to alter its angle to suit himself. 

Chief among its refinements is the lubrication of the valve 
mechanism. In addition to the celebrated hollow crank shaft, 
circulating system of lubrication, which has been in use on 
Marmon cars for many years, special provision has been made 
in the "41" motor for lubricating the cam shaft and valve tap- 
pets. Oil is delivered to a tunnel in which the cam shaft is 
mounted, and through which the oil circulates, its only way 
of escape being out through the tappets and into the valve tap- 
pet chamber. 

* • • 

Trade In Healthy Condition 

That while there are very naturally certain concerns mar- 
keting motor cars which must eventually quit the business, the 
automobile industry to-day is on a firmer foundation than ever 
in its history, is the opinion of C. W. Nash, president and gen- 
eral manager of the Buick Motor Company, who has just re- 
turned from a trip through Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas. 

"I heard a good deal of talk while I was gone," said Mr. 
Nash, "and I believe there is a tendency to overlook the fact 
that we are engaged in an industry that we are all interested in 
seeing promoted, and I feel that often talk does a good deal of 
damage, and by that I refer especially to the talking done by 
the people in the business. 

"There is no question but that the automobile industry is as 
stable and sound as any other business to-day, with the excep- 
tion, of course, of the comparatively few concerns which have 
not, never had, and never will have, any right to be engaged 
in the business at all. 



I would hate to see any one connected with the Buick 
Motor Company credited with having talked to such an extent 
that it would have a damaging effect on the industry as a whole. 
Any concern that has any right has as good a right to live as 
any other concern has, and that means eventually of course the 
survival of the fittest." 

• » • 

Republic Club House 

A model club house was formally opened Thursday, January 
15th, for the employees of The Republic Rubber Company at 
Youngstown, Ohio. The club is controlled by a board of gov- 
ernors, three of whom are appointed by the president and five 
elected by employees of the company. The membership fee is 
only one dollar a year. Meals are served, and in addition ar- 
rangements have been made so that all employees can eat their 
packed lunches on the main floor of the club house instead of 
in the factory. A ball field, tennis court, shower baths and nu- 
merous other privileges are open to members. 

• * • 

Halllwel) Expanding 

That well known automobile supply house, the Halliwell 
Company, after a most successful year of business, has de- 
cided upon a large extension of its scope to meet the growing 
demand for the lines handled. The concern is planning to take 
on the representation of a number of other standard accessories 
in order to give complete lines a full listing. Only standard 
lines will be carried, as it is the distinct policy of the Halliwell 
organization to show and represent lines which are well proved 
as to their merit in every particular. 

• * * 

American vs. Foreign Cars 

Sales Manager J. V. Hall, of Olds Motor Works, Lansing, 
Mich., after visiting the foreign exhibit at the Hotel Astor, has 
expressed himself as being more firmly convinced that the 
American car is the one for Americans. He said : "The foreign 
manufacturers, French, German and Italian, turn out a beauti- 
fully finished product, using expensive and rare woods, fancy 
trimmings and upholstery, and putting the greatest of care into 
finishing the metal parts of motor and chassis. These features 
are very worthy, but what American would sacrifice the unit 
power plant, electric lights, electric starter and ignition system, 
all in a compact unit, in order to get rosewood or mahogany 
finished bodies and beautiful tapestry cushions, with chassis, 
wheels and springs too light, and power too low for our roads, 
because the car has a foreign name plate and cost twice as much 
as a car adapted to our conditions ?" 



MACHINE WORK 
BLACKSMITHING 
GEAR CUTTING 



ELECTRIC LIGHTING 

AND STARTING 
SYSTEMS INSTALLED 



PHONE FRANKLIN 5433 



J. J. SCHNERR 

ALL MAKES OF AUTOMOBILES REPAIRED 



BRAZING AND WELDING OF ALUMINUM. 

BRASS AND CAST IRON 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



ED. 



F. HENDRICKS 
Manager 



774-780 Golden Gate Ave 
At Gough St., San Francisco 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 31, 1914. 



Tendency in Six of Motors 

"Even the most patriotic American will admit that styles in 
Motors, as well as hats, originate in Paris. It's an interesting 
thing, but not at all strange, that the small town Middle West- 
ern merchant looks to Chicago for his ideas in style. Chicago 
goes to New York, New York depends upon London, and Lon- 
don gets ideas from Paris," says J. I. McMullin of the Jeffery 
Auto Sales Company. 

"An interesting lesson has been taught to farsighted American 
motor car manufacturers by the Paris show. Everybody knows 
that Paris was driving one cylinder cars before we Americans 
abandoned the high bicycle; Paris had two cylinder cars before 
we had begun to develop the single cylinder, and long before 
the four cyliner was considered popular in America, Paris had 
practically abandoned the two. 

"It's simply a matter of history that is being repeated in the 
case of the light high speed motor such as was first put on the 
market in America by the Jeffery Company in the car selling 
at $1,550. 

"Out of eighty-six exhibitors at the Paris show, fifty-two did 
not show a single model with as large a piston as is used in the 
Jeffery four and six — 3%x5%. The thirty-four manufacturers 
that did exhibit larger motors also had cars of smaller bore. 

"Only a very small proportion of motors shown had above 
4-inch bore, and in every instance where more than one model 
was shown with larger bore than in the Jeffery four, with three 
exceptions the maker was building as many or more of the 
smaller bore than of the larger. 

"It must also be remembered that in Europe the nobility is 
bound to have something different than the ordinary public, 
and these larger bore cars have a very limited sale, and only 
find a market among the members of those who follow the hab- 
its of the royal household. 

"Such firms as the Sizaire-Nauden show five models, the 
smallest being 2-56 and the largest 3.15, with only a 5.51 
stroke; the Darracq exhibited only two models, one being 2.95 
and the other 3.35; the longest stroke used, 5.12. The Charron 
exhibited four models, ranging from 2.36 to 3.15. This, cou- 
pled with the fact that fifty-two manufacturers have abandoned 
motors of more than Q/% inch bore, is certainly the strongest 
evidence that motors above 3 l/ 2 inch bore will grow less and 
less, and will only be made for a' few extravagant people. 

"It is interesting to note that of all the list of exhibitors there 
are only about five manufacturers who use "T" head motors at 
all, and of these five, only two use the "T" head motor ex- 
clusively." 

* * * 

C. K. Kell to Build Trucks 

C. P. Keil, one of the best known automobile men in Cali- 
fornia has announced his plans for a new automobile factory 
— they intend manufacturing a line of commercial vehicles 
especially adapted for use in California. The factory will be 
located in Oakland, and according to present plans they ex- 
pect to have a vehicle on the market within two months. In 
speaking of the plans, Keil says ; 

"We will build a four-cylinder fifteen hundred pound deliv- 
ery truck that will be capable of doing practically all kinds of 
work. This truck will also feature a worm gear type ot trans- 
mission, and will be equipped with hard or pneumatic tires. 

"There is no reason why the merchants throughout California 
should not patronize home industry instead of sending their 
money to the East. We intend making just as fine a truck as 
can be made, using only the very best materials and employ- 
ing only the highest grade mechanics. Patronizing home in- 
dustry would be another big advantage for merchants in San 
Francisco and other cities in California. It will place the users 
of our trucks in just the same position as the merchants who 
are living close to the Eastern factory." 

Keil has just left Oakland for the East in order to purchase 
the first allotment of supplies for manufacturing this new line 

of trucks. 

* * * 

Goodrich on Motor Truck 

Prospective buyers of motor trucks, whether at present opera- 
tors or about to purchase the first truck, will find a gold mine of 
authentic information for purposes of comparison in Volume 
ill 'of "Motor Trucks of America," now ready for distribution by 
The B. F. Goodrich Company. 



The first volume, brought out last year, was so enthusiasti- 
cally received that early in the year the decision was reached 
to make this digest of motor truck information an annual event: 
hence Volume II. 

The current issue contains illustrations and specifications of 
over ninety trucks built in the United States. The data and 
photographs were furnished by the manufacturers themselves, 
representing approximately 92 per cent of the motor truck pro- 
duction of the country. The information is full and accurate, 
covering every detail of interest in the make-up of the truck. 

Typographically, the book is an excellent piece of work, 
and is increased from the 68 pages of last year to 112 for the 
1914 issue. It is cross-indexed and contains, besides the truck 
photos and specifications, a reprint of "Efficiency in Buying 
and Operating Motor Trucks," as written for The Review of 
Reviews by W. A. McDermid. Copies of this handbook may 
be secured by addressing The B. F. Goodrich Company, Truck 
Tire Department, at Akron, Ohio. 

* * * 
Actress Buys Regal 

Miss Edyth Tyrrell, a Portland actress visiting in San Fran- 
cisco, was so smitten with the Regal coupe, which she saw for 
the first time on her trip here, that she purchased one imme- 
diately. Miss Tyrrell was pleased with the Regal closed car, 
because she is a little woman, and she found that the Regal 
coupe was lower to the roadway, than the overhung cars, and 
she wanted a car easy to step into and easy to alight from. The 
Regal is proving unusually popular with the ladies, just be- 
cause it is so easy to enter, and being so, it follows that it re- 
quires no effort at all to alight from it. Once the occupant is 
seated at the steering wheel, there is no occasion to alight 
again until she is at her journey's end. She controls every 
movement of the car from the wheel, from starting and stop- 
ping the motor and the car herself, to lighting the headlights 
and tail lamp. 



Weldely Motor In Premiers 

Among the leading automobile engineers at the New York 
Automobile show recently, the interest centered with the Weid- 
ely Motor exhibited at the Premier booth. The experts are 
frank to confess that Weidely has made a big advance in auto- 
mobile engine construction. The point that particularly im- 
pressed them is that the Weidely Motor in principle is exactly 
the same as the ordinary type of automobile engine. 



Farmer and Auto 

"Salinas boasts of one man who, instead of fighting the pay- 
ment of the auto tax, busies himself with finding another use to 
which to put his machine that he may secure funds to make the 
payment for a license," says J. W. Leavitt, of J. W. Leavitt & 
Company, agents for the Overland car. 

"Formerly he used his car for pleasure, but now that the 
Legislature has put on an additional annual burden of from ten 
to thirty dollars upon it, he uses it to plow his garden, thus doing 
away with the services of the horse. 

"Fred W. Jansen is an urban farmer. A small farm suits 
him best. He is also an automobilist. He used to keep a 
horse, but that was before he kept an automobile. The horse 
used to furnish power for plowing his small farm, the area 
arable this year being about sixty-five by seventy-five feet. 
Jansen began to spade it, but hearing Sam Klett's caterpillar 
clattering made him tired, and he undertook a stunt of hard 
thinking. 

"Why not utilize his automobile, which had crowded his 
faithful Dobbin out of a job? He went into a brown study, 
and when he came out of the trance, he had the scheme framed 
up. He had a rope and a one-pulley black. He fastened the 
pulley on the fence, took the plow to the farther side of his 
'farm,' set the plow, put the rope through the block and hitched 
it to the automobile. 

"One boy drove the auto forward and backed it up; another 
moved the pulley down the width of the furrow, and Jansen 
dragged the plow back to the other side of the 'farm' and held it 
true across the tract. He accomplished in three hours what it 
would have taken a week to spade. But he is not going to take 
jobs of plowing on that basis." 



January 31, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



Auto Come to Stay 

"There can be no question but that the automobile has come 
to stay, and that its use is becoming more general throughout 
the country with every passing day," says the San Jose Mer- 
cury, editorially. 

"It is no longer a luxury for the few, but a necessity for the 
many, and therefore its use brings it into close relation with 
all the people. Contemporaneous with the use of the automo- 
bile comes the necessity for better roads, and in the develop- 
ment of both vehicle and roads is the paramount requirement 
of safety to human life. This applies not alone to the persons 
in a motor car, but with equal force to the pedestrian or other 
travelers on the public highway. The steady growth of this 
modern means of transportation has brought about many bet- 
terments in road construction and maintenance, but there has 
been very little achieved thus far for increasing the safety 
of crossings. 

"The presence on the roads of numerous automobiles travel- 
ing at various speeds, and in different directions, often heavy, 
and driven at excessive speed by powerful engines, has intro- 
duced into the modern road builder's problem a factor of traffic 
not taken into account in all previous road-building. When in 
rapid motion on a street or road constructed to accommodate an 
entirely different class of vehicle, the automobile is a possible 
source of danger, and the chief points of danger to both its oc- 
cupants and others is the grade crossing. Fatal accidents at 
these crossings by collision and high speeding are of almost 
daily occurrence, and the fact is clearly apparent that there is 
a lack of adequate protection for human life at the road 
crossings. 

"This applies not only to cross-streets and cross-roads, but 
to steam and electric railroads as well. Before the advent of 
the automobile, the crossings, though a menace to safety, were 
not as dangerous. Every careful driver stopped his vehicle be- 
fore attempting to cross a track, and he made sure that there 
was no train approaching. Those drivers less cautious depended 
upon the sense of hearing to warn them of approaching cars 
or trains, for there was little team traffic sufficiently noisy to 
overcome the roar of a train or the blast of the steam or air 
whistle. In many instances the grade where the railroad 
crosses is at an elevation above the country road, and fre- 
quently there are trees or hedges obstructing the view. All 
these conditions render the crossings perilous to life and limb. 

"Drivers of automobiles do not, as a rule, stop their cars ex- 



cept where absolutely necessary, and very few take the pre- 
caution of coming to a full stop before crossing tracks. Fur- 
thermore, the speed at which many automobile drivers travel 
gives less time for looking each way along the track, and the 
driver has to give more attention to his driving than does the 
driver of a team. The number of crossings is so great and their 
elimination so difficult and expensive, that it would be many 
years before they could be substituted by under or over cross- 
ings. Protection by flagmen is also too costly, and not practical 
in many sparsely settled localities. Automatic bells might be 
utilized with efficiency, but the one best safeguard is an unob- 



Save Repairs 



Save Money 



Save Trouble 



by replacing- worn out Bearines with the world re- 
nowned HESS-BFMGHTS. All sizes carried In stock 




Pacific Const Distributors 

CHANSLOR & LYON COMPANY 

Ran Francisco Oaklan.1 Fresno Los Angeles Portland Seattle Spokane 



Phone Sutter 300 



Pacific Sightseeing Co., Prop. 



FOURTH ST. GARAGE 



FOURTH & HARRISON STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Commercial Trucks 
A Specialty 



Automobile 
Supplies 



The attention of owners of pleasure cars living In San Mateo 
County Is called to the convenience of this Garage to Third 
and Townsend Street Depot. 

THE I.ARC.FST GROUND FLOOR FIREPROOF GARAGE WEST OF CHICAGO 



If you want to prolong the life 
of your engine, 

If you want to eliminate smok* 
and carbon, 
» m r-r~\ |-^k ¥ If you want to reduce your oil 

MoToRoL — 

U«e MoToRoL 
"It suits because It doesn't soot" 

Hughson & Merton, Inc. 

530 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 


There is nothing in Goodrich Advertising 
that isn't in Goodrich Goods 

Goodrich JS. Tires 

Best in the Long Run 

There are forty-three years of experience in 
rubber manufacturing in every Goodrich Tire 

THE B. F. GOODRICH COMPANY 

Everything that's best in Rubber 
341-347 Market Street San Francisco 

Loa Angeles Oakland Freano Sacramento 


Full factory equipment on all Pack- 

ii ij,-. /^. x /cdi » ards. Oldsraoblles. Cola*. Thomas and 

nUUVCK Sevan others. Absolutely perfect. 

Full set of four— Su to Stt. Under 

A 1 IX 11 IARY SPRINCi Sr compression by heavy loads, roueh 

rtUAILlAlM arrtllHU or. ro . dl or bumps. Under all conditions 

rides as easy as on asphalt. Impos- 
SHOCK. ABSORBER »lble to break sprlnjs. No competition 

HOOVER SPRING CO. 

(IT Turk SL, San Francisco 


PEART 4 ELKINGTON 

VULCANIZING »-—•••» 

4 2 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 


Machinists and Engineers 
fCCMAM DD/"\C Automobile Repairing a Specialty 

IXCtlNAlN DKUo. ,„ . |d , B G ,„ tTam , „«,. Hyde 

and Latklo Streets 

hones: Franklin Mei. Keai J mm 
P 


FREE FROM CARBON 
PANHARD L. H. 4 B. I. BILL 

y^v T T 6*3 Oolden Oate Ave 
^-"^ "*- ' San Francisco. Cal. 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 31, 1914. 



structed view along the track for a considerable distance on 
each side of each crossing. 

"There are doubtless some instances where such provision 
cannot be made, but these cases are few. This is a simple 
remedy and can be made effective with small outlay. By the 
careful clearing away of all hedges, trees or other obstructions, 
or possibly by diverting the roadway, many dangerous cross- 
ings, now creating needless risks to human life on the public 
highway, may be rendered reasonably safe for the traveling 
people. There has been so many distressing accidents recently 
that some remedial action by both the State and the counties 

has become an urgent necessity." 

* * * 

Racing Mercers 

"We were all set and prepared to again demonstrate the 
speed and durability of our cars in the two foremost contests 
held on this side of the Atlantic when the Savannah races were 
suddenly abandoned," says Bert Latham, of the Simplex-Mer- 
cer Pacific Coast agency. 

"That we are greatly disappointed by the action of the Sa- 
vannah Club goes without saying, but it has had no effect on our 
determination to enter Mercer cars in the Vanderbilt Cup races 
at Santa Monica. For some years, Mercer cars have been en- 
tered in various forms of competition, from hill climbing con- 
tests to road and track races, and we have already been for- 
tunate in scoring success. 

"We have supported racing because we believe that it is nec- 
essary, despite the claims of others that it has passed its stage 
of usefulness to manufacturers. As in the early days of the- in- 
dustry, there are many benefits to be derived from racing. 

"That racing stimulates interest in automobiling in general 
will not be denied. It took the automobile manufacturers of 
France several years to learn that they had made a mistake in 
abandoning racing. 

"It was an expensive lesson to France, but the manufac- 
turers of that country now are attempting to mend the "bread" 
they made, with the result that there were more road races and 
other varieties of automobile competition held in that country 
this year than ever before. 

"It follows that American manufacturers will have the same 
experience that befell their French brothers unless a change of 
heart in the "antis" of racing is experienced. That such a 
change will occur, and within a short time we are certain. 

"All that is needed to start the entire delegation back "into 
the game" is the re-entrance of one or two prominent concerns. 
It is our opinion that next season will see such a step taken, 
and then the public will again be able to witness motor car con- 
tests that will sparkle with interest and create an even greater 
demand for the automobile. The days of the speedway contests 
and road race with flourishing entry lists are bound to come, 

and the sooner the better for all concerned." 

* * * 

Makes You Drink Water 

"The medical fraterinty is crediting the automobile with an- 
other blessing to mankind, inasmuch that it has increased the 
drinking of fluid, especially water," says B. H. Pratt, manager 
Pacific Coast branch of the Fisk Rubber Company. 

"It is a well known fact that the average American citizen 
does not drink enough water. While at times he may drink 
enough, and even more than enough fluid, yet of that life-giving 
water he partakes generally very scantily. The consideration 
of driving through space at a high rate of speed existent to 
a more exhilarated state. A nervous system is quickened by 
the sensation, and the different functions of the body are oper- 
ated at a higher rate of speed in keeping with the pace of the 
car. This exhilaration counteracts the desire for liquor, but 
does create a thirst. Of course, there are many who make this 
exhilaration as the cause for a great deal of joy-riding. This 
joy-riding would exist just the same whether the automobile 
was invented or not; people who joy-ride and take their pleas- 
ures in that way would find some other means to satisfy their 
desire. 

"But with the sane and conservative man, a man of family 
and of respectability, there is no such desire for drink that is 
of the spirit kind. The automobile, however, does increase a 
thirst, and this thirst can only be thoroughly appeased by drink- 
ing water or some other fluid of a like nature, which is not 
harmful to the system. Therefore, medical experts are claim- 
ing that the automobile has again proved its great worth to 
mankind." 



PHOTOGRAPHS 



Call on us when you want photographs of any kind. 
We can and will please you. Our new studio, the 
largest west of New York, covers 9,000 square feet of 
floor space, and is completely equipped for every branch 
of our business. You are cordially invited to call and 
we will be very glad to take you through the different 
departments, portrait, commercial, copying, enlarging, 
Kodak, etc. You will be interested.. 

ARTHUR SPAULDING CO., 
Everything In Modern Photography. 

625-633 Eddy St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Phones— Franklin 1184. Home C 4084. 



LARKINS & CO. 

Carriage and Automobile Body Builders 

Established In 1865 

Announces the removal of their Offices and Factory to 

1610-1612-1614 Van Ness Avenue 

between California and Sacramento Sts. 
Phone Prospect 30 

Where their entire attention will be devoted to the prompt delivery uf 
the best work that a modern plant, high-class mechanics and materials 
can produce. 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft and Transportation 

While anywhere In United State*. Canada and Europe 



/ETNA INSURANCE CO. 



OF HARTFORD 
PACIFIC BRANCH— 32S California Street, 



San Francisco 



Tips to Auto mo bili sts 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 
The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide: 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
SAN JOSE.— Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlors for ladles in connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St James Sts. 



SAN JOSE.— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North *irat street. The beat French 
dinner in California. 76 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
rartlcular attention. 

PALO ALTO.— PALO ALTG GARAGE. 443 Emmerson St. Tel., P. A. 
333. Auto livery at all hours. Tires and sundries in Btock. Gasoline, oil, 
repairing, lathework, vulcanizing. Open day and night. 



CLASS A GARAGE, Inc. 

Particular Service to Out of Town Motorists 
"CLUB" Service Our Specialty 

735-751 Post Street San Francisco 

TELEPHONE PROSPECT 2280 



LIGHT YOUR AUTOMOBILE WITH THE 

DYNETO Automatic Electric Lighting System 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 
Pacific Coail Agents 
630 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 

CALL AND SEE DEMONSTRATION 



January 31, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



27 






IF1NANCIAU 



The week was marked with a not- 
Security Situation, able relaxation in the New York 

New York and Abroad, money market, a relief which is ex- 
pected to produce better inquiry for 
gilt-edged bonds. The stock list fluctuated in uncertain fashion 
under realizing. As a whole, the market seems to be awaiting 
some new incentive before expanding on the buying side. The 
next big factor to influence the market will be the outcome of 
the petition of the big railroads of the country for an increase 
in freight rates; another factor is the Mexican situation. It 
seems to be agreed that the Huerta regime cannot last more than 
a fortnight longer. Trade reports continue to improve in tone, 
but are somewhat irregular; the stock market in its movements 
measures these improvements. On the whole, the outlook is 
decidedly more cheerful. Union Pacific has ordered 5,000 new 
cars at a cost of $5,000,000, and the Santa Fe 1,000 cars. U. S. 
Steel is opening its many branches, and expects to be working 
full time in a few months. The price of the stock, common, 
touched the highest point this week since the slump of last 
year. Some experts estimate that the winter wheat crop of 
this year will beat all records. These influences are naturally 
having a beneficial effect on the security markets of the East; 
keen investors, watching prices, are inclined to believe that the 
advance, long expected, will be punctuated with lively reces- 
sions, due to realizing. Corporations are being warned that 
they must pay in full the income tax of 1913. London is not 
yet feeling as optimistic as other places, though the extreme ten- 
sion of last year has passed. It is expected that the bank rate 
there will be reduced to 3 per cent shortly, which will materially 
relieve the situation there. Americans are being bought in 
small lots, but, as in New York, realizing follows any sharp 
advance. On the Continent, the situation is very quiet, under 
the uncertainty overhanging the Balkans. 



Situation of 
Hawaiian Sugar. 



The Hawaiian sugar crop to be 
handled during 1914 by the Sugar 
Factor's Co., of Honolulu, is esti- 
mated at 466,150 tons, against 445,- 
000 tons in 1913, and 479,000 tons in 1912. The price of 3.125 
cents, which ruled during December-August last year, was the 
lowest in eighteen years. The previous "free sugar" period 
lasted from December 1, 1850, to August 27, 1894. From the 
latter date until annexation, there was an ad valorem duty of 
40 per cent. Even in free sugar times the price only dropped 
to 31/2 cents, or lower, on six weekly summary dates in 1893, 
twenty-four dates in 1894, eighteen in 1895, and six weekly 
dates in 1896. The lowest price at which Hawaiian sugar has 
sold since 1890 was 2.75 cents, December 19-26, 1894, after the 
repeal of "free sugar," and the restoration of the 40 per cent ad 
valorem under the reciprocity treaty. It is believed that the 
tariff reductions have been fairly well discounted, and that 
prices will probably advance after March 1st next. 



H. H. Noble, president of the North- 
North. Cal. Power ern California Power Co., Consoli- 

And Oro Elec. Deal. dated, has made the following an- 
nouncement regarding the sale of 
the property: "Negotiations looking to the consolidation of the 
Northern California Power Co., Con., and the Oro Electric Cor- 
poration, have reached the point where it can be definitely stated 
that this will be brought about through the agency of a new 
corporation, to be formed to take over the two companies. The 
amalgamation will be very advantageous to both companies, 
as the Northern California Power Company at the present time 
has a large surplus of power, and the Oro Electric is now pur- 
chasing power from other companies, and has already con- 
tracted for a large amount of power to be connected this spring. 
The consolidation will be advantageous also at other points, as 
there will be a great saving in operating expenses. The dredg- 
ing properties of the Oro Electric have not been included in the 
consolidation." It is said that the basis of the deal is 80 per 
cent for California Northern, and 20 per cent for Oro. 



Situation in Local 
Stocks and Bonds. 



There is a somewhat better feeling 
permeating trading in local securi- 
ties, and by degrees they are gradu- 
ally arising from the extreme low 
prices of last year. Every few days one of them gives a heave 
and hoists itself by its own bootstraps inter a better position. 
This week United Railroads 4's took a turn in this movement, 
and almost reached 60; it acquired a gain of 7 points in four 
weeks, which is a handsome step in recovery, considering the 
slips and dips of 1913. This last rise is said to be due to the 
purchases in the open market made by the company for sink- 
ing fund purposes. Those in touch with the company are con- 
fident that President Lilienthal and the strong group of local 
financiers actively assisting him will in a comparatively short 
period place the finances of the company in the strongest posi- 
tion of record. Trading in bonds generally was fair, but with- 
out feature. Fractional gainers were California Gas and Elec- 
tric, Electric unifying, Pac. Elec. Ry. and Pac. Gas & Elec. In 
stocks, Alaska Packers and Northern Cal. Power loomed in the 
foreground, the latter because of its stronger position materially 
and financially through the deal of a newly formed company to 
consolidate it with Oro Electric. Spring Valley and Associated 
Oil were among those which developed an easier tone. Amalga- 
mated Oil was a feature in the oil list by gaining 13 points to 
88 in less than a fortnight; the company has just brought in a 
700 barrel well of 25 gravity in the La Habra field, which 
proves up a strip of land a mile wide on its own holding there. 
The company is paying a $1.25 monthly dividend right along, 
and is in an excellent position financially and physically. Pac. 
Gas & Elec. declared its regular $1.50 quarterly dividend this 
week, payable February 16th. 



The bank capital and surplus of the banks of the five 

largest cities on the Pacific Coast reported as follows : San 
Francisco, $44,880,000; Los Angeles, $9,400,000; Seattle, 
$5,500,000; Portland, $6,775,000; Spokane, $4,175,000. 



Fireman's Fund Insurance Company has announced a 

plan to retire on pension all officials who reach the age limit of 
65 years. 



REAL ESTATE FIRMS 
CONSOLIDATE 

HIND COMPANY 

INC. 

beg to announce the consolidation with it of the firm of 

RHINE & COMPANY 

and the transfer of its offices at 153 Sutter Street to 
more commodious quarters at 

245 MONTGOMERY ST. 



IN\E3TMENT SECURITIES 

E»\»bllttnd il<> 

SUTRO &. CO. 

410 Montgomery Street 

Detailed Information in Regard to Any Security 

Will be Fumiahed Upon Request 

Members— The San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange 



TELEPHONE DOUGLAS 2487 



E. F. HUTTON &. CO. 

THE PIONEER HOUSE 

INVESTMENT BONDS 
490 California Street 



Branch ST. FRANCIS 

New Yoifc 9 

New ] 

Chicago Board of Trade 



HOTEL. SAN FRANCISCO 

Los A 
New 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 31, 1914. 




THE BALLAD OF ST. JOHN OF NEPOMUK. 

Now to you all be Christmas cheer, 

Good health and better luck! 
Praise now the womb that gave to men 

St. John of Nepomuk! 

He stood before King Wenceslaus 

With none to take his part — 
Despair upon his kindly face, 

But honor in his heart. 

"How now, O priest!" the monarch cried 

(And death was in his smile) ; 
"Didst shrive the faithless soul of her 

Who did my bed defile ? 

"Didst bid her go in peace who now 

Hath left no peace to me? 
Tell then the sin that thou didst shrive, 

E'en as she told it thee!" 

"0 King," our saint, unblenching, said, 

"Such may I not reveal, 
For priesthood's vow upon my lips 

Hath set a ghostly seal. 

"That seal which on my mouth is set 

Forever and for ay 
Thou shalt not loose by mortal pain 

Nor wrench with racks away." 

They stretched his body on the rack 
And there their will they wrought; 

He cried in his wo to seven saints, 
But not the tale they sought. 

"Confess," the king in fury cried, 

"Her love as it befell. 
Or steel shall cleave thy way to death 

And fire thy path to hell!" 

"O King," he said, "I will not speak, 
Tho thou in tears shouldst kneel. 

For manhood's honor on my mouth 
Has set a mighty seal. 

"And that seal set upon my mouth 

M